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I know I can use something like string[3:4] to get a substring in Python, but what is the is something[::3]?

Sorry but it's hard to search for this on Google.

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6  
5 answers in the 30 seconds it took me to think about a useful way to answer. –  Wayne Werner Aug 10 '10 at 20:30
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Well, how can you do any proper answering if you stop and think? –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Aug 10 '10 at 21:00

7 Answers 7

up vote 44 down vote accepted

it means 'nothing for the first argument, nothing for the second, and jump by three'. It gets every third item of the sequence sliced. Extended slices is what you want. New in Python 2.3

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wow didn't know that!! –  iamgopal Aug 12 '10 at 6:41
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It can also be used to reverse a list using [::-1] –  thavan Mar 26 at 4:27
    
@RickyRobinson - When you say "get rid", did you mean "return" or "spit out"? #lostintranslation –  PikalaxALT Sep 19 at 0:57
    
Ops. I definitely don't know what I was thinking. :/ Let me correct it in a separate comment and I'll delete the old one. –  Ricky Robinson Sep 19 at 8:54
    
It returns every item on a position that is a multiple of 3. Since 3*0=0, it returns also the item on position 0. For instance: range(10)[::3] outputs [0, 3, 6, 9] –  Ricky Robinson Sep 19 at 8:56

Python uses the :: to separate the End, the Start, and the Step value.

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This doesn't provide enough detail to actually be helpful. –  bstpierre Oct 26 '12 at 12:07

Python sequence slice addresses can be written as a[start:end:step] and any of start, stop or end can be dropped. a[::3] is every third element of the sequence.

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1  
Sequence addresses, not array addresses. Besides, they're called lists in Python. –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Aug 10 '10 at 21:03
    
@Adriano Yes, I'll fix it –  deinst Aug 10 '10 at 21:20

The third parameter is the step. So [::3] would return every 3rd element of the list/string.

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3  
Array? is that a fancy php term for a list? :) –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Aug 10 '10 at 21:03
    
^ Good call, fixed ;) –  lupefiasco Aug 12 '10 at 14:46
    
sequence even ... –  Skylar Saveland Feb 7 '11 at 13:03

seq[::n] is a sequence of each n-th item in the entire sequence.

Example:

>>> range(10)[::2]
[0, 2, 4, 6, 8]

The syntax is:

seq[start:end:step]

So you can do:

>>> range(100)[5:18:2]
[5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17]
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Incorrect by being too specific in that it can be any kind of sequence, not just a list. –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Aug 10 '10 at 21:01
    
edited, thanks Adriano. –  Yuval Adam Aug 10 '10 at 21:30
    
In Python 3, your example range(N)[::step] produces a range object, not a list. To really see what is happening, you need to coerce the range to a list, np.array, etc. –  PikalaxALT Sep 19 at 0:54

Explanation

s[i:j:k] is, according to the documentation, "slice of s from i to j with step k". When i and j are absent, the whole sequence is assumed and thus s[::k] means "every k-th item".

Examples

First, let's initialize a list:

>>> s = range(20)
>>> s
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19]

Let's take every 3rd item from s:

>>> s[::3]
[0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18]

Let's take every 3rd item from s[2:]:

>>> s[2:]
[2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19]
>>> s[2::3]
[2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 17]

Let's take every 3rd item from s[5:12]:

>>> s[5:12]
[5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11]
>>> s[5:12:3]
[5, 8, 11]

Let's take every 3rd item from s[:10]:

>>> s[:10]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> s[:10:3]
[0, 3, 6, 9]
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When slicing in Python the third parameter is the step. As others mentioned, see Extended Slices for a nice overview.

With this knowledge, [::3] just means that you have not specified any start or end indices for your slice. Since you have specified a step, 3, this will take every third entry of something starting at the first index. For example:

>>> '123123123'[::3]
'111'
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protected by Bo Persson Mar 28 '12 at 21:53

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