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I want to write a console application that have a different behavior depending if the input is coming from keyboard or from, say, a file.

Is it possible? What's the most elegant way to do it in C#?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 35 down vote accepted

You can find out by p/invoking the Windows FileType() API function. Here's a helper class:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

public static class ConsoleEx {
    public static bool IsOutputRedirected {
        get { return FileType.Char != GetFileType(GetStdHandle(StdHandle.Stdout)); }
    }
    public static bool IsInputRedirected {
        get { return FileType.Char != GetFileType(GetStdHandle(StdHandle.Stdin)); }
    }
    public static bool IsErrorRedirected {
        get { return FileType.Char != GetFileType(GetStdHandle(StdHandle.Stderr)); }
    }

    // P/Invoke:
    private enum FileType { Unknown, Disk, Char, Pipe };
    private enum StdHandle { Stdin = -10, Stdout = -11, Stderr = -12 };
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern FileType GetFileType(IntPtr hdl);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern IntPtr GetStdHandle(StdHandle std);
}

Usage:

bool inputRedirected = ConsoleEx.IsInputRedirected;

UPDATE: these methods were added to the Console class in .NET 4.5. Without attribution I might add :( Simply use the corresponding method instead of this helper class.

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Excellent, this code helped me find an alternative way of getting to the input stream handed to sendmail from Bugzilla. For whatever reason it wasn't coming through as stdin via the Console class. I used this to get the stream and create my own reader around it which I replaced the original Console.In using Console.SetIn() and it works great now. Thanks again! –  jpierson May 3 '12 at 8:58
3  
The code above was put in place for .NET 4.5 which now include properties IsErrorRedirected, IsInputRedirected and IsOutputRedirected. –  Ron Jacobs Jun 29 '12 at 20:03
1  
interesting implementation, unfortunately it is not applicable for cross-platform development. –  Lo Sauer Sep 21 '12 at 8:51

Interestingly, when a pipe is open, the System.Console.WindowHeight and System.Console.WindowWidth Parameters are zero, which I found out due to several ArgumentOutOfRangeException's in code paths that did not care for the console size being zero.

Crossplatform: The behavior is the same under MS dotNET and Mono on Linux and Windows (I haven't tried it on a Mac).

When either STDIN or STDOUT are piped, the console size is set to 0. Thus building on Hans's implementation, my code is as follows:

using System;


 public static class ConsoleEx {
    private static bool isConsoleSizeZero { 
        get{  return 0 == (Console.WindowHeight + Console.WindowWidth); }
    }
    public static bool IsOutputRedirected {
        get { return isConsoleSizeZero && !Console.KeyAvailable; }
    }
    public static bool IsInputRedirected {
        get { return isConsoleSizeZero && Console.KeyAvailable; }
    }

}

Related:

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Nice catch on the Console.WindowHeight! I'm not so sure about the use of Console.KeyAvailable though. For one, it's perfectly possible to redirect both input and output, and your code would not be able to detect that. –  jpbochi Sep 24 '12 at 23:15
1  
don't work for me –  Sergey Mirvoda Mar 3 '13 at 11:04
    
I'm running on Debian Wheezy. The 0 == (Console.WindowHeight + Console.WindowWidth) trick works for me. For instance, when my app is launched via monit the sum is 0. When manually from the command prompt it is a positive number. When running consoleless, KeyAvailable returns false but if I actually call ReadKey it yields zero. –  LatencyMachine Jan 28 '14 at 20:01

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