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Given a collection, is there a way to get the last N elements of that collection? If there isn't a method in the framework, what would be the best way to write an extension method to do this?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 124 down vote accepted
collection.Skip(Math.Max(0, collection.Count() - N)).Take(N);
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2  
+1, as this works in Linq to Entities/SQL. I'm guessing it's also more performant in Linq to Objects than James Curran's strategy. –  StriplingWarrior Aug 10 '10 at 20:57
8  
Depends on the nature of collection. Count() might be O(N). –  James Curran Aug 10 '10 at 21:00
3  
@James: Absolutely correct. If dealing strictly with IEnumerable collections, this could be a two-pass query. I'd be very interested in seeing a guaranteed 1-pass algorithm. It might be useful. –  kbrimington Aug 10 '10 at 21:18
3  
Did some benchmarks. It turns out LINQ to Objects performs some optimizations based on the type of collection you're using. Using arrays, Lists, and LinkedLists, James's solution tends to be faster, though not by an order of magnitude. If the IEnumerable is calculated (via Enumerable.Range, e.g.), James's solution takes longer. I can't think of any way to guarantee a single pass without either knowing something about the implementation or copying values to a different data structure. –  StriplingWarrior Aug 10 '10 at 21:32
19  
I'm missing the point of the .Take(N) - seems to work fine without it... –  RedFilter Jan 5 '12 at 16:44
coll.Reverse().Take(N).Reverse().ToList();


public static IEnumerable<T> TakeLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> coll, int N)
{
    return coll.Reverse().Take(N).Reverse();
}

UPDATE: To address clintp's problem: a) Using the TakeLast() method I defined above solves the problem, but if you really want the do it without the extra method, then you just have to recognize the Enumerable.Reverse() can be used as an extension method, you aren't required to use it that way:

List<string> mystring = new List<string>() { "one", "two", "three" }; 
mystring = Enumerable.Reverse(mystring).Take(2).Reverse().ToList();
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The problem I have with this, is if I say: List<string> mystring = new List<string>() { "one", "two", "three" }; mystring = mystring.Reverse().Take(2).Reverse(); I get a compiler error because .Reverse() returns void and the compiler chooses that method instead of the Linq one that returns an IEnumerable. Suggestions? –  clintp Dec 21 '10 at 16:14
1  
You can solve this problem by explicitly casting mystring to IEnumerable<String>: ((IEnumerable<String>)mystring).Reverse().Take(2).Reverse() –  Jan Hettich Aug 17 '11 at 18:08
    
Easy and simple enough but requires reversing the order two times completely. This can be the best way –  shashwat Sep 7 '13 at 14:51
    
I like it in addition to the accepted answer from kbrimington. If you do not care about the order after you have the last N records you can skip the second Reverse. –  ZoolWay Apr 29 at 10:35

Note: I missed your question title which said Using Linq, so my answer does not in fact use Linq.

If you want to avoid caching a non-lazy copy of the entire collection, you could write a simple method that does it using a linked list.

The following method will add each value it finds in the original collection into a linked list, and trim the linked list down to the number of items required. Since it keeps the linked list trimmed to this number of items the entire time through iterating through the collection, it will only keep a copy of at most N items from the original collection.

It does not require you to know the number of items in the original collection, nor iterate over it more than once.

Usage:

IEnumerable<int> sequence = Enumerable.Range(1, 10000);
IEnumerable<int> last10 = sequence.TakeLast(10);
...

Extension method:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> TakeLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection,
        int n)
    {
        if (collection == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("collection");
        if (n < 0)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("n", "n must be 0 or greater");

        LinkedList<T> temp = new LinkedList<T>();

        foreach (var value in collection)
        {
            temp.AddLast(value);
            if (temp.Count > n)
                temp.RemoveFirst();
        }

        return temp;
    }
}
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Nice, clean and much better performance. –  Kyle Rozendo Aug 10 '10 at 20:53
    
I still think you have a good, valid answer even if it isn't technically using Linq, so I still give you a +1 :) –  mgroves Aug 10 '10 at 21:17
    
clean, neat and extensible +1 ! –  Yasser Dec 4 '12 at 6:24

Here's a method that works on any enumerable but uses only O(N) temporary storage:

public static class TakeLastExtension
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> TakeLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int takeCount)
    {
        if (source == null) { throw new ArgumentNullException("source"); }
        if (takeCount < 0) { throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("takeCount", "must not be negative"); }
        if (takeCount == 0) { yield break; }

        T[] result = new T[takeCount];
        int i = 0;

        int sourceCount = 0;
        foreach (T element in source)
        {
            result[i] = element;
            i = (i + 1) % takeCount;
            sourceCount++;
        }

        if (sourceCount < takeCount)
        {
            takeCount = sourceCount;
            i = 0;
        }

        for (int j = 0; j < takeCount; ++j)
        {
            yield return result[(i + j) % takeCount];
        }
    }
}

Usage:

List<int> l = new List<int> {4, 6, 3, 6, 2, 5, 7};
List<int> lastElements = l.TakeLast(3).ToList();

It works by using a ring buffer of size N to store the elements as it sees them, overwriting old elements with new ones. When the end of the enumerable is reached the ring buffer contains the last N elements.

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2  
+1: This should have better performance than mine, but you should make sure it does the right thing when the collection contains fewer elements than n. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Aug 10 '10 at 20:58
    
Well, most of the time I assume people will take care when copying code from SO for production use to add such things themselves, it might not be a problem. If you're going to add it, consider checking the collection variable for null as well. Otherwise, excellent solution :) I was considering using a ring-buffer myself, because a linked list will add GC-pressure, but it's been a while since I did one and I didn't want to hassle with test-code to figure out if I did it right. I must say I'm falling in love with LINQPad though :) linqpad.net –  Lasse V. Karlsen Aug 10 '10 at 21:11
    
A possible optimization would be to check if the enumerable implemented IList, and use the trivial solution if it does. The temporary storage approach would then only be needed for truely 'streaming' IEnumerables –  piers7 Jul 29 '11 at 1:21
1  
trivial nit-pick: your arguments to ArgumentOutOfRangeException are in the wrong order (R# says) –  piers7 Jul 29 '11 at 1:29

I am surprised that no one has mentioned it, but SkipWhile does have a method that uses the element's index.

public static IEnumerable<T> TakeLastN<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int n)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("Source cannot be null");

    int goldenIndex = source.Count() - n;
    return source.SkipWhile((val, index) => index < goldenIndex);
}

//Or if you like them one-liners (in the spirit of the current accepted answer);
//However, this is most likely impractical due to the repeated calculations
collection.SkipWhile((val, index) => index < collection.Count() - N)

The only perceivable benefit that this solution presents over others is that you can have the option to add in a predicate to make a more powerful and efficient LINQ query, instead of having two separate operations that traverse the IEnumerable twice.

public static IEnumerable<T> FilterLastN<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int n, Predicate<T> pred)
{
    int goldenIndex = source.Count() - n;
    return source.SkipWhile((val, index) => index < goldenIndex && pred(val));
}
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Use EnumerableEx.TakeLast in RX's System.Interactive assembly. It's an O(N) implementation like @Mark's, but it uses a queue rather than a ring-buffer construct (and dequeues items when it reaches buffer capacity).

(NB: This is the IEnumerable version - not the IObservable version, though the implementation of the two is pretty much identical)

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This is the best answer. Don't roll your own if there is a suitable library that does the job and the RX team is high quality. –  bradgonesurfing Feb 19 at 10:02
    
If you are going with this, install it from Nuget - nuget.org/packages/Ix-Async –  kape123 Apr 10 at 22:00

If you don't mind dipping into Rx as part of the monad, you can use TakeLast:

IEnumerable<int> source = Enumerable.Range(1, 10000);

IEnumerable<int> lastThree = source.AsObservable().TakeLast(3).AsEnumerable();
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2  
You don't need AsObservable() if you reference RX's System.Interactive instead of System.Reactive (see my answer) –  piers7 Jul 29 '11 at 1:32

If you are dealing with a collection with a key (e.g. entries from a database) a quick (i.e. faster than the selected answer) solution would be

collection.OrderByDescending(c => c.Key).Take(3).OrderBy(c => c.Key);
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+1 works for me and it's easy to read, i have a small number of objects in my list –  fubo Sep 27 '13 at 9:44

If using a third-party library is an option, MoreLinq defines TakeLast() which does exactly this.

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Below the real example how to take last 3 elements from a collection (array):

// split address by spaces into array
string[] adrParts = adr.Split(new string[] { " " },StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
// take only 3 last items in array
adrParts = adrParts.SkipWhile((value, index) => { return adrParts.Length - index > 3; }).ToArray();
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It is a little inefficient to take the last N of a collection using LINQ as all the above solutions require iterating across the collection. TakeLast(int n) in System.Interactive also has this problem.

If you have a list a more efficient thing to do is slice it using the following method

/// Select from start to end exclusive of end using the same semantics
/// as python slice.
/// <param name="list"> the list to slice</param>
/// <param name="start">The starting index</param>
/// <param name="end">The ending index. The result does not include this index</param>
public static List<T> Slice<T>
(this IReadOnlyList<T> list, int start, int? end = null)
{
    if (end == null)
    {
        end = list.Count();
    }
     if (start < 0)
    {
        start = list.Count + start;
    }
     if (start >= 0 && end.Value > 0 && end.Value > start)
    {
        return list.GetRange(start, end.Value - start);
    }
     if (end < 0)
    {
        return list.GetRange(start, (list.Count() + end.Value) - start);
    }
     if (end == start)
    {
        return new List<T>();
    }
     throw new IndexOutOfRangeException(
        "count = " + list.Count() + 
        " start = " + start +
        " end = " + end);
}

with

public static List<T> GetRange<T>( this IReadOnlyList<T> list, int index, int count )
{
    List<T> r = new List<T>(count);
    for ( int i = 0; i < count; i++ )
    {
        int j=i + index;
        if ( j >= list.Count )
        {
            break;
        }
        r.Add(list[j]);
    }
    return r;
}

and some test cases

[Fact]
public void GetRange()
{
    IReadOnlyList<int> l = new List<int>() { 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 };
     l
        .GetRange(2, 3)
        .ShouldAllBeEquivalentTo(new[] { 20, 30, 40 });
     l
        .GetRange(5, 10)
        .ShouldAllBeEquivalentTo(new[] { 50, 60 });

}
 [Fact]
void SliceMethodShouldWork()
{
    var list = new List<int>() { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 };
    list.Slice(1, 4).ShouldBeEquivalentTo(new[] { 3, 5, 7 });
    list.Slice(1, -2).ShouldBeEquivalentTo(new[] { 3, 5, 7 });
    list.Slice(1, null).ShouldBeEquivalentTo(new[] { 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 });
    list.Slice(-2)
        .Should()
        .BeEquivalentTo(new[] {9, 11});
     list.Slice(-2,-1 )
        .Should()
        .BeEquivalentTo(new[] {9});
}
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