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I have my code and it does go run to infinity. What I want is that if on the unix command window if the user inputs a ctrl C, I want the program to finish the current loop it in and then come out of the loop. So I want it to break, but I want it to finish the current loop. Is using ctrl C ok? Should I look to a different input?

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1 Answer 1

To do this correctly and exactly as you want it is a bit complicated.

Basically you want to trap the Ctrl-C, setup a flag, and continue until the start of the loop (or the end) where you check that flag. This can be done using the signal module. Fortunately, somebody has already done that and you can use the code in the example linked.

Edit: Based on your comment below, a typical usage of the class BreakHandler is:

ih = BreakHandler()
ih.enable()
for x in big_set:
    complex_operation_1()
    complex_operation_2()
    complex_operation_3()
    # Check whether there was a break.
    if ih.trapped:
        # Stop the loop.
        break
ih.disable()
# Back to usual operation
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for x in big_set: complex_operation_1() complex_operation_2() complex_operation_3() # Check whether there was a break. if ih.trapped: # Stop the loop. break ih.disable() # Back to usual operation... so for this part the only thing I would need to do to initiate it is if ih.trapped: # Stop the loop. break ih.disable() at the end of my code then? –  Yuki Aug 10 '10 at 22:28
    
@Yuki: adding code to comments loses its formatting which messes with Python code, but it looks like you are largely right. You need to do bh = BreakHandler(); bh.enable() before the loop, of course. –  Muhammad Alkarouri Aug 10 '10 at 23:02
    
I have this: (I don't know at the moment how to turn the code here into a nicer format) ih = BreakHandler() ih.enable() while(True): Do whatever if ih.trapped: break ih.disable() –  Yuki Aug 11 '10 at 15:03
    
When I run the above code, my code only loops it once even when I didn't press ctrl C. –  Yuki Aug 11 '10 at 15:03
    
I implemented everything like you said but when I run it, it is as if there’s a flag implemented even before I can implement the ctrl-c. Thus my loop only goes through 1 cycle. Where does do_cleanup come from and is it necessary? –  Yuki Aug 11 '10 at 17:44

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