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Let's say I have a large HTML file with different kinds of tags, similar to the StackOverflow one you're looking at right now.

Now let's say you click an element on the page, what would the Javascript function look like that calculates the most basic XPath that refers to that specific element?

I know there are an infinite ways of refering to that element in XPath, but I'm looking for something that just looks at the DOM tree, with no regard for IDs, classes, etc.

Example:

<html>
<head><title>Fruit</title></head>
<body>
<ol>
  <li>Bananas</li>
  <li>Apples</li>
  <li>Strawberries</li>
</ol>
</body>
</html>

Let's say you click on Apples. The Javascript function would return the following:

/html/body/ol/li[2]

It would basically just work its way upward the DOM tree all the way to the HTML element.

Just to clarify, the 'on-click' event-handler isn't the problem. I can make that work. I'm just not sure how to calculate the element's position within the DOM tree and represent it as an XPath.

PS Any answer with or without the use of the JQuery library is appreciated.

PPS I completely new to XPath, so I might even have made a mistake in the above example, but you'll get the idea.

Edit at August 11, 2010: Looks like somebody else asked a similar question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2537224/generate-get-the-xpath-for-a-selected-textnode/3458558#3458558

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5  
XPath uses 1-based indexing, so it's li[2]. –  Matthew Flaschen Aug 11 '10 at 0:59
    
Thanks, I've changed the code. –  Marc Aug 11 '10 at 12:30

9 Answers 9

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Firebug can do this, and it's open source (BSD) so you can reuse their implementation, which does not require any libraries.

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Works perfectly! Thanks –  Marc Aug 11 '10 at 12:37
    
I like the Firebug implementation (getElementXPath), because it favors the ID over a xpath tree if the element has any. –  OneWorld Apr 18 '12 at 23:50
1  
@OneWorld Yes, but it only checks the element you are getting the xpath of and not it's parents. See my answer, it produces an xpath more like the google chrome inspector. –  DanS Jun 21 '12 at 7:45
    
thanks @Matthew :) –  rkp Apr 25 at 20:12
1  
Firebug's implementation has a bug in line 1365: it only adds the index, (e.g. "[3]") if there are previous siblings of same type. This is wrong because an XPath without the index will match all siblings of this type, even further ones. Example: /p/b will match all b tags under all p tags under root. Firebug just skips the index if it doesn't find previous siblings of same type. –  wadim Aug 1 at 13:07

A function I use to get an XPath similar to your situation, it uses jQuery:

function getXPath( element )
{
    var xpath = '';
    for ( ; element && element.nodeType == 1; element = element.parentNode )
    {
        var id = $(element.parentNode).children(element.tagName).index(element) + 1;
        id > 1 ? (id = '[' + id + ']') : (id = '');
        xpath = '/' + element.tagName.toLowerCase() + id + xpath;
    }
    return xpath;
}
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Works perfectly as well! Thanks –  Marc Aug 11 '10 at 12:41
    
line 7: never seen that syntax, usually it would be written like this: id = id > 1 ? ('[' + id + ']') : ''; –  Frunsi Aug 11 '10 at 14:07
    
You're correct, I would have written it as you did, but I was just copying/pasting...I found this script some time ago and never bothered to clean it up. Either way, both ways of writing it are equivalent. –  JCD Aug 11 '10 at 16:11

The firebug implementation can be modified slightly to check for element.id further up the dom tree:

  /**
   * Gets an XPath for an element which describes its hierarchical location.
   */
  var getElementXPath = function(element) {
      if (element && element.id)
          return '//*[@id="' + element.id + '"]';
      else
          return getElementTreeXPath(element);
  };

  var getElementTreeXPath = function(element) {
      var paths = [];

      // Use nodeName (instead of localName) so namespace prefix is included (if any).
      for (; element && element.nodeType == 1; element = element.parentNode)  {
          var index = 0;
          // EXTRA TEST FOR ELEMENT.ID
          if (element && element.id) {
              paths.splice(0, 0, '/*[@id="' + element.id + '"]');
              break;
          }

          for (var sibling = element.previousSibling; sibling; sibling = sibling.previousSibling) {
              // Ignore document type declaration.
              if (sibling.nodeType == Node.DOCUMENT_TYPE_NODE)
                continue;

              if (sibling.nodeName == element.nodeName)
                  ++index;
          }

          var tagName = element.nodeName.toLowerCase();
          var pathIndex = (index ? "[" + (index+1) + "]" : "");
          paths.splice(0, 0, tagName + pathIndex);
      }

      return paths.length ? "/" + paths.join("/") : null;
  };
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Do the following code returns correct xpath for the div in following html? –  Sali Hoo Nov 8 '13 at 21:43

There is nothing built in to get the xpath of an HTML element, but the reverse is common for example using the jQuery xpath selector.

If you need to determine the xpath of an HTML element you will have to provide a custom function to do this. Here are a couple of example javascript/jQuery impls to calculate the xpath.

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I'm actually using jQuery's XPath selector as well, but needed a way to have the user generate an XPath himself. The second page you linked to has some nice examples of this. Thanks! –  Marc Aug 11 '10 at 12:43

Just for fun, an XPath 2.0 one line implementation:

string-join(ancestor-or-self::*/concat(name(),
                                       '[',
                                       for $x in name() 
                                          return count(preceding-sibling::*
                                                          [name() = $x]) 
                                                 + 1,
                                       ']'),
            '/')
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I'm not sure what it does, but it might come in handy at a later point. Thanks! –  Marc Aug 11 '10 at 16:50
function getPath(event) {
  event = event || window.event;

  var pathElements = [];
  var elem = event.currentTarget;
  var index = 0;
  var siblings = event.currentTarget.parentNode.getElementsByTagName(event.currentTarget.tagName);
  for (var i=0, imax=siblings.length; i<imax; i++) {
      if (event.currentTarget === siblings[i] {
        index = i+1; // add 1 for xpath 1-based
      }
  }


  while (elem.tagName.toLowerCase() != "html") {
    pathElements.unshift(elem.tagName);
    elem = elem.parentNode;
  }
  return pathElements.join("/") + "[" + index + "]";
}

EDITED TO ADD SIBLING INDEX INFORMATION

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion, but this code doesn't seem to take into account similar sibling nodes. E.g. the code returns 'BODY/OL/LI' instead of 'BODY/OL/LI[2]'. –  Marc Aug 11 '10 at 12:34
    
Picky, picky: I will edit and add functionality for that. –  Robusto Aug 11 '10 at 13:59
2  
Didn't mean to be picky, but the sibling index information is crucial for the problem I'm trying to solve. Anyway, thanks for updating your code! –  Marc Aug 11 '10 at 16:51
    
This code has several problems: (1) when counting sibling index it actually checks if any of the siblings is the target of the event (instead of checking if any of the siblings is the same node type as the event target), (2) it takes into account sibling index information on the deepest level only, not further up the tree. –  wadim Aug 6 at 10:38

see my example that will at least try to shorten the expression if there is a unique id. Javascript get XPath of a node

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I have just modified DanS' solution in order to use it with textNodes. Very useful to serialize HTML range object.

/**
 * Gets an XPath for an node which describes its hierarchical location.
 */
var getNodeXPath = function(node) {
    if (node && node.id)
        return '//*[@id="' + node.id + '"]';
    else
        return getNodeTreeXPath(node);
};

var getNodeTreeXPath = function(node) {
    var paths = [];

    // Use nodeName (instead of localName) so namespace prefix is included (if any).
    for (; node && (node.nodeType == 1 || node.nodeType == 3) ; node = node.parentNode)  {
        var index = 0;
        // EXTRA TEST FOR ELEMENT.ID
        if (node && node.id) {
            paths.splice(0, 0, '/*[@id="' + node.id + '"]');
            break;
        }

        for (var sibling = node.previousSibling; sibling; sibling = sibling.previousSibling) {
            // Ignore document type declaration.
            if (sibling.nodeType == Node.DOCUMENT_TYPE_NODE)
                continue;

            if (sibling.nodeName == node.nodeName)
                ++index;
        }

        var tagName = (node.nodeType == 1 ? node.nodeName.toLowerCase() : "text()");
        var pathIndex = (index ? "[" + (index+1) + "]" : "");
        paths.splice(0, 0, tagName + pathIndex);
    }

    return paths.length ? "/" + paths.join("/") : null;
};
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The solution below is preferable if you need to reliably determine the absolute XPath of an element.

Some other answers either rely partly on the element id (which is not reliable since there can potentially be multiple elements with identical ids) or they generate XPaths that actually specify more elements than the one given (by erroneously omitting the sibling index in certain circumstances).

The code has been adapted from Firebug's source code by fixing the above-mentioned problems.

getXElementTreeXPath = function( element ) {
    var paths = [];

    // Use nodeName (instead of localName) so namespace prefix is included (if any).
    for ( ; element && element.nodeType == Node.ELEMENT_NODE; element = element.parentNode )  {
        var index = 0;

        for ( var sibling = element.previousSibling; sibling; sibling = sibling.previousSibling ) {
            // Ignore document type declaration.
            if ( sibling.nodeType == Node.DOCUMENT_TYPE_NODE ) {
                continue;
            }

            if ( sibling.nodeName == element.nodeName ) {
                ++index;
            }
        }

        var tagName = element.nodeName.toLowerCase();

        // *always* include the sibling index
        var pathIndex = "[" + (index+1) + "]";

        paths.unshift( tagName + pathIndex );
    }

    return paths.length ? "/" + paths.join( "/") : null;
};
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