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Does the "delete" statement below "doubly free" an object?

(...object_list is a global vector<object*>...)

vector< object * >::iterator     it, eit, iter;
object *p_object;
vector< object * >   dead_objects;

it  = object_list_.begin();
eit = object_list_.end();

//---collect pointers of all dead objects to dead_objects vector
for ( ; it != eit; it++ )
{
    p_object = *it;
    if ( p_object->is_dead() == false )
        continue;

    dead_objects.push_back( p_object );
}

//---free every dead object from the global object_list
for ( iter = dead_objects.begin(); iter != dead_objects.end(); iter++ )
{
    p_object = *iter;

    it  = object_list_.begin();
    eit = object_list_.end();

    for ( ; it != eit; it++ )
    {
        if ( *it != p_object )
            continue;

        object_list_.erase( it );
        delete p_object;
        break;
    }
}

I ask the question because the erase() statement above should have called the destructor of an object and freed it already, shouldn't it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

erase() does call the destructor on the object, but the destructor of a pointer type (such as object * here) does nothing -- it does NOT call delete on the pointer. If you want it to call delete, you need to use some object (such as auto_ptr<object *>) which does call delete.

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thank you for the answer!! i had the question because in another program i use map<int,object*> and the program crashed when i dereferenced an object* after i called erase() to remove the object* from the map. (i am using VC++ 6) so i wonder if vector<object*>.erase() frees the object too. –  cow Aug 11 '10 at 2:17

It would appear not; if you have a vector of pointers to objects, calling erase() to remove one of them simply removes the pointer from the vector. You are still required to delete it yourself - this is because STL containers are designed primarily to collect objects by value.

Just a couple of suggestions - IMO your code would be clearer if you used STL algorithms like std::find instead of looping over all your vectors by hand. I'm not sure what the point of dead_objects vs object_list is - you don't seem to gain anything by storing them in the temporary vector, but something may have been lost in copying the code to SO. And std::vector is not optimal for lots of random erasures like this since erase runs in linear time - std::remove followed by erase would be a more efficient approach. For example:

for(vector<object*>::iterator it = object_list.begin(); it != object_list.end(); ++it) {
    if((*it)->is_dead()) {
        delete *it;
        *it = NULL;
    }
}
object_list.erase(std::remove(object_list.begin(), object_list.end(), NULL), object_list.end());
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thank you for the answer! but doesn't your last statement object_list.erase(std::remove(object_list.begin(), object_list.end(), NULL), object_list.end()); erase ALL objects, dead and alive? –  cow Aug 11 '10 at 2:10
    
No - remove removes all the elements from the list equal to NULL and returns an iterator to just after the last valid element. The erase call then truncates the vector to this new length. –  Peter Aug 11 '10 at 2:22
    
i got it. thanks for the great trick of truncation!! –  cow Aug 11 '10 at 2:38

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