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whats the difference between C Strings and C++ strings. Specially while doing dynamic memory allocation

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Do you mean the difference between using char* and char[] strings in the two languages, or the difference between char based strings and std::string? –  dmckee Aug 11 '10 at 2:43
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Please define what you mean by "C string" and "C++ string". Both (especially the latter) are ambiguous. –  strager Aug 11 '10 at 2:43
    
    
Also clarify "while doing". –  Potatoswatter Aug 11 '10 at 2:45
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@Gollum, that's probably an implementation issue. I don't think there's anything in the standard to say that C++ strings aren't allowed to be null-terminated. In fact, it may make c_str easier to implement. –  paxdiablo Aug 11 '10 at 3:05

2 Answers 2

I hardly know where to begin :-)

In C, strings are just char arrays which, by convention, end with a NUL byte. In terms of dynamic memory management, you can simply malloc the space for them (including the extra byte). Memory management when modifying strings is your responsibility:

char *s = strdup ("Hello");
char *s2 = malloc (strlen (s) + 6);
strcpy (s2, s);
strcat (s2, ", Pax");
free (s);
s = s2;

In C++, strings (std::string) are objects with all the associated automated memory management and control which makes them a lot safer and easier to use, especially for the novice. For dynamic allocation, use something like:

std::string s = "Hello";
s += ", Pax";

I know which I'd prefer to use, the latter. You can (if you need one) always construct a C string out of a std::string by using the c_str method.

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std::string are objects with... –  dmckee Aug 11 '10 at 2:56
    
Damn you c_str()! –  Ed S. Aug 11 '10 at 6:11

In C, strings are just char arrays which, by convention, end with a NULL byte. And you must be responsible for the memory management using malloc, realloc, free, which always is considered to be a nightmare

In C++, strings (std::string) are objects , with all the associated automated memory management and control which makes them a lot safer and easier to use, thus it can increase automatically

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Hmm, you appear to have just lifted some paragraphs from my answer and only very slightly modified some text. Not convinced that that's the hallmark of a useful answer :-) –  paxdiablo Jul 3 '13 at 7:43

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