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I was wondering, is it possible to use Artificial Intelligence to make compilers better?

Things I could imagine if it was possible -

  • More specific error messages
  • Improving compiler optimizations, so the compiler could actually understand what you're trying to do, and do it better

If it is possible, are there any research projects on this subject?

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4  
It's difficult to use AI to make anything better, besides washing machines. –  JnBrymn Aug 11 '10 at 3:34
    
In C# you can use tools like StyleCop and FxCop and resharper to help find potential problems. You can write custom rules, until they take so long to run that you will need a server farm. What is your goal anyway? Resharper can rewrite loops as LINQ, and that in turn often helps the C# compiler to emit the fastest code possible. However, speed should not be the only goal. –  Hamish Grubijan Aug 11 '10 at 3:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should look at MILEPOST GCC -

MILEPOST GCC is the first practical attept to build machine learning enabled open-source self-tuning production (and research) compiler that can adapt to any architecture using iterative feedback-directed compilation, machine learning and collective optimizatio

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Are you refering to something like Genetic Programming?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_programming

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An optimizing compiler is actually a very complex expert system and Expert systems is one of the oldest branches of artificial intelligence.

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This is indeed a field being researched. Look at the milepost branch for GCC, which relies on profile-guided optimization and machine learning. The recent scientific literature for compilers is full of papers using a combination of data mining, machine learning (through genetic algorithms or neural networks), and more "classical", pattern-recognition of certain code patterns.

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