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In Windows for ASP, you can get it perfmon, but...

How to get "requests per second" for Apache in Linux?

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The question is not clear. Can you specify is you ask for realtime or historical logs? –  ejaenv Nov 30 '12 at 11:40

9 Answers 9

up vote 12 down vote accepted

In realtime, or can you use mod_status?

And apparently, there is a version of top for apache...

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3  
The mentioned link seems to be pointing to an invalid location... –  Aron Rotteveel Apr 28 '13 at 21:30

Here is a short bash script I made up to sample the request rate (based on dicroce's suggestion of using wc -l on the log file).

#!/bin/sh

##############################################################################
# This script will monitor the number of lines in a log file to determine the
# number of requests per second.
#
# Example usage:
# reqs-per-sec -f 15 -i /var/www/http/access.log
#
# Author: Adam Franco
# Date: 2009-12-11
# License: http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html GNU General Public License (GPL)
##############################################################################

usage="Usage: `basename $0` -f <frequency in seconds, min 1, default 60> -l <log file>"

# Set up options
while getopts ":l:f:" options; do
 case $options in
 l ) logFile=$OPTARG;;
 f ) frequency=$OPTARG;;
 \? ) echo -e $usage
  exit 1;;
 * ) echo -e $usage
  exit 1;;

 esac
done

# Test for logFile
if [  ! -n "$logFile" ]
then
 echo -e $usage
 exit 1
fi

# Test for frequency
if [  ! -n "$frequency" ]
then
 frequency=60
fi

# Test that frequency is an integer
if [  $frequency -eq $frequency 2> /dev/null ]
then
 :
else
 echo -e $usage
 exit 3
fi

# Test that frequency is an integer
if [  $frequency -lt 1 ]
then
 echo -e $usage
 exit 3
fi

if [ ! -e "$logFile" ]
then
 echo "$logFile does not exist."
 echo 
 echo -e $usage
 exit 2
fi

lastCount=`wc -l $logFile | sed 's/\([0-9]*\).*/\1/'`
while true
do
 newCount=`wc -l $logFile | sed 's/\([0-9]*\).*/\1/'`
 diff=$(( newCount - lastCount ))
 rate=$(echo "$diff / $frequency" |bc -l)
 echo $rate
 lastCount=$newCount
 sleep $frequency
done
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This script is really awesome, thanks for posting this. –  Chris Henry Feb 23 '11 at 22:22
    
Great! Thanks! I am wondering how the performance of wc -l is. Another approach would be the possibility to pipe the logfile to stdin of the script. So also grep could be added to meassure only .php requests and so on. –  Alex Jul 11 '12 at 17:04

You can use 'wc -l' on the access log to get the number of lines (which roughly corresponds to the number of requests...) Do that every minute and subtract the last value to get the delta...

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I think mod_status can do it ...

http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.0/mod/mod_status.html

You can also use zenoss to collect data from mod_status using the community apache plugin.

http://www.zenoss.com/

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Script shows inconsistent numbers. -f parameter affects output a lot! and first reading is not accurate either.

I ended up using:

while true; do tail -n0 -f access.log>/tmp/tmp.log & sleep 2; kill $! ; wc -l /tmp/tmp.log | cut -c-2; done 2>/dev/null

Found here.

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1  
well the above script wasnt very good either.. :p –  xztraz Sep 19 '11 at 12:49

I didn't like any of the solutions I found, so I wrote my own.

  • mod_status isn't really accurate enough. It's based on how long the server is up, which in our case is normally months. What I'm looking for is traffic spikes.
  • the shell script above uses a sleep() statement which isn't ideal as it takes x seconds to actually retrieve the data.

So this solution takes a particular line in the access_log 15000 requests ago, and uses the time recorded to compare with the current time.

# This check is needed because if the logs have just rolled over, then we need a minimum
# amount of data to report on.
# You will probably need to adjust the 3500000 - this is roughly the file size when the
# log file hits 15000 requests.
FILESIZE=`ls -l /var/log/httpd/access_log | awk '{print $5}' `
if [ $FILESIZE -le 3500000 ]
then
        # not enough data - log file has rolled over
        echo "APACHE_RPS|0"
else
        # Based on 15000 requests.  Depending on the location of the date field in
        # your apache log file you may need to adjust the ...substr($5... bit
        LASTTIME=`tail -15000 /var/log/httpd/access_log | head -1 | awk '{printf("%s\n",substr($5,2,20));}' `
        APACHE_RPS=`echo $LASTTIME | gawk -vREQUESTS=15000 ' {
                # convert apache datestring into time format accepted by mktime();
                monthstr = substr($0,4,3);
                if(monthstr == "Jan"){ monthint = "01"; }
                if(monthstr == "Feb"){ monthint = "02"; }
                if(monthstr == "Mar"){ monthint = "03"; }
                if(monthstr == "Apr"){ monthint = "04"; }
                if(monthstr == "May"){ monthint = "05"; }
                if(monthstr == "Jun"){ monthint = "06"; }
                if(monthstr == "Jul"){ monthint = "07"; }
                if(monthstr == "Aug"){ monthint = "08"; }
                if(monthstr == "Sep"){ monthint = "09"; }
                if(monthstr == "Oct"){ monthint = "10"; }
                if(monthstr == "Nov"){ monthint = "11"; }
                if(monthstr == "Dec"){ monthint = "12"; }
                mktimeformat=sprintf("%s %s %s %s %s %s [DST]\n", substr($0,8,4), monthint, substr($0,1,2), substr($0, 13,2), substr($0, 16,2), substr($0, 19,2) );
                # calculate difference
                difference = systime() - mktime(mktimeformat);
                # printf("%s - %s = %s\n",systime(), mktime(mktimeformat), difference);
                printf("%s\n",REQUESTS/difference);
        } ' `

        echo "APACHE_RPS|${APACHE_RPS}"
fi
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I wrote a set of Perl scripts that show the average requests-per-second for the past 1, 5 and 15 minutes (like top). It's at https://gist.github.com/1040144 .

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mod_status is the one! if you call it with:

http://{ip}/server-status?refresh=1&auto-refresh=true

Then it auto refreshes every 2 seconds so you can see a constant realtime view :-)

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To sum up, you can use mod_status and apachetop.

Alternatively, you can use Adam Franco's and Jon Daniel's nice scripts to have a live look.

If you would like to have a look at a partiular date and hour, you can issue this little command:

grep "29/Oct/2014:12" /var/log/apache2/example.com.log | cut -d[ -f2 | cut -d] -f1 | awk -F: '{print $2":"$3}' | sort -nk1 -nk2 | uniq -c | awk '{ if ($1 > 10) print $0}'

Replace with the date and hour you are interested and also with the proper pathfilename of the log file.

It will print out something like:

1913 12:47
 226 12:48
 554 12:49
 918 12:50

There is a nice article here with more options on using a combination of awk, cut and uniq commands to get quick stats of the kind.

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