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Is there any linux command that will print the directory structure in the form of a tree, e.g.,

folder1
   a.txt
   b.txt
folder2
   folder3
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closed as off topic by Jens Erat, Juhana, dkinzer, Luc M, Joseph Mastey May 11 '13 at 22:42

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4  
Just run find. Or find . -not -path '*/\.*' to hide files and folders starting with .. If you want to have output with spaces, as in the question, use it with this "find prettifier" script: find . -not -path '*/\.*' | python -c "import sys as s;s.a=[];[setattr(s,'a',list(filter(lambda p: c.startswith(p+'/'),s.a)))or (s.stdout.write(' '*len(s.a)+c[len(s.a[-1])+1 if s.a else 0:])or True) and s.a.append(c[:-1]) for c in s.stdin]" – user Jun 14 '14 at 0:49
    
Shouldn't such questions get migrated to SuperUser rather than closed ? – Balmipour Oct 10 '15 at 10:34
    
@Balmipour: Perhaps they should. But "Only questions which are less than 60 days old can be migrated" (What is migration and how does it work?). Don't ask me why. – user Nov 24 '15 at 22:17
    
i dont think this question deserves to be closed as "off topic". The tags seem to be right. – Sanket Berde Dec 1 '15 at 8:27
up vote 290 down vote accepted

is this what your looking for tree, should be in most distributions (maybe as an optional install)?

~> tree -d /proc/self/
/proc/self/
|-- attr
|-- cwd -> /proc
|-- fd
|   `-- 3 -> /proc/15589/fd
|-- fdinfo
|-- net
|   |-- dev_snmp6
|   |-- netfilter
|   |-- rpc
|   |   |-- auth.rpcsec.context
|   |   |-- auth.rpcsec.init
|   |   |-- auth.unix.gid
|   |   |-- auth.unix.ip
|   |   |-- nfs4.idtoname
|   |   |-- nfs4.nametoid
|   |   |-- nfsd.export
|   |   `-- nfsd.fh
|   `-- stat
|-- root -> /
`-- task
    `-- 15589
        |-- attr
        |-- cwd -> /proc
        |-- fd
        | `-- 3 -> /proc/15589/task/15589/fd
        |-- fdinfo
        `-- root -> /

27 directories

sample taken from maintainers web page.

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23  
Note for any visitor seeing this! You can add the opt -L # where # is replaced by a number, to specify the max recursivity level. – Hugo Dozois Apr 8 '13 at 17:21
19  
Note for any visitor seeing this: remove -d to display files also! – 5chdn May 11 '13 at 8:49
5  
Using Ubuntu v12.04, this was not pre-installed. – gbmhunter Aug 20 '13 at 21:17
12  
Note for any visitor seeing this: The man page lists a truckload of more flags for you :) – oivvio Apr 26 '14 at 18:52
2  
You can install this on Mac OS X with Homebrew as well! – Mark Nov 5 '14 at 3:07

You can use this one:

ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e 's/:$//' -e 's/[^-][^\/]*\//--/g' -e 's/^/   /' -e 's/-/|/'

It shows a graphical representation of the current sub-directories, e.g. in /var/cache/:

   .
   |-apache2
   |---mod_cache_disk
   |-apparmor
   |-apt
   |---archives
   |-----partial
   |-apt-xapian-index
   |---index.1
   |-dbconfig-common
   |---backups
   |-debconf

Source

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2  
If you want it with spaces, more like the OP requested, then this: ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e 's/:$//' -e 's/[^-][^\/]*\// /g' -e 's/^/ /' – Ben Oct 4 '13 at 0:56
    
any way I can make this ignore dotfiles? E.g. prevent it from listing the contents of .git? – GeorgeMillo Apr 25 '14 at 6:31
    
@GeorgeMillo see my comment – user Jun 14 '14 at 0:55
1  
Doesn't print files. – Tomáš Zato Apr 21 '15 at 20:57

To add Hassou's solution to your .bashrc, try:

alias lst='ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e '"'"'s/:$//'"'"' -e 
          '"'"'s/[^-][^\/]*\//--/g'"'"' -e '"'"'s/^/   /'"'"' -e '"'"'s/-/|/'"'"
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