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Let says I have classes A, B and C

B extends A C extends B

all have public void foo() method defined.

Now from C's foo() method I want to invoke A's foo() method (NOT its parent B but it's super super parent A's method)

I checked super.super.foo(); But it's invalid syntax.

How can I achieve this?

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Just because someone should ask, why does C extend B if you seem to want it to extend A directly? (I imagine there are other parts you're relying on B's functionality for, or something) –  Tim Stone Aug 11 '10 at 7:46
    
A's foo() can be called from C using super.foo() only if B doesn't override A's foo(). –  YoK Aug 11 '10 at 8:02
1  
Effective Java 2nd Edition, Item 16: Favor composition over inheritance. Also, check out the decorator pattern; it may suit your need better. –  polygenelubricants Aug 11 '10 at 8:47
    
possible duplicate of Why is super.super.method(); not allowed in Java? –  Damien MATHIEU Apr 8 '13 at 20:32

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can't even use reflection. Something like

Class superSuperClass = this.getClass().getSuperclass().getSuperclass();
superSuperClass.getMethod("foo").invoke(this);

would lead to an InvocationTargetException, because even if you call the foo-Method on the superSuperClass, it will still use C.foo() when you specify "this" in invoke. This is a consequence from the fact that all Java methods are virtual methods.

It seems you need help from the B class (e.g. by defining a superFoo(){ super.foo(); } method).

That said, it looks like a design problem if you try something like this, so it would be helpful to give us some background: Why you need to do this?

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1  
It was not my requirement. I was just thinking out of my head all possibilites of playing around with inheritance and got this question. Thanks.. I got the answer –  Harish Aug 19 '10 at 6:18

You can't - because it would break encapsulation.

You're able to call your superclass's method because it's assumed that you know what breaks encapsulation in your own class, and avoid that... but you don't know what rules your superclass is enforcing - so you can't just bypass an implementation there.

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Odd.. I remember that there was a way to call Object.toString() even if toString() was overloaded by a superclass. But Type.this doesn't compile. :-/ –  Aaron Digulla Aug 11 '10 at 7:34
    
@Aaron: I'm not sure about Object.toString() - were you thinking of System.identityHashCode? –  Jon Skeet Aug 11 '10 at 7:35
    
Never used that, I'm pretty sure that it was toString(). Object.super.toString() doesn't work either. Maybe it was a bug in an early Java version or something. –  Aaron Digulla Aug 11 '10 at 7:39

You can't do it in a simple manner.

This is what I think you can do:

Have a bool in your class B. Now you must call B's foo from C like [super foo] but before doing this set the bool to true. Now in B's foo check if the bool is true then do not execute any steps in that and just call A's foo.

Hope this helps.

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6  
That's the wildest Java hack ever :) –  Nikita Rybak Aug 11 '10 at 7:40
1  
Jon Skeet's answer is best: this kind of functionality should not be enabled because it breaks encapsulation. Instead of addressing the HOW to do something like this, we should address the WHY would anyone even want to do something like this (and tear apart that argument for violating OOP principles). –  polygenelubricants Aug 11 '10 at 7:41
1  
@Nikita Rybak: People ask for things that should not be asked. Hence the answers that should not be given ;) –  Madhup Singh Yadav Aug 11 '10 at 7:42
    
@polygenelubricants : I am not challenging Skeet's answer. I do not dare too. I just gave my view point. –  Madhup Singh Yadav Aug 11 '10 at 7:44
2  
It would seem to be thread unsafe. If you are going to do something like this you can put void foo ( boolean flag ) { if ( flag ) super . foo ( ) ; else this . foo ( ) ; } in class B. As for encapsulation, once you come up with some reason why class B should have a foo(boolean) method, then how it is implemented is an implementation detail. –  emory Aug 11 '10 at 7:49

It's not possible, we're limited to call the superclass implementations only.

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(I was too much impressed by Aarons now deleted answer that I deleted mine two seconds after posting ;) - undeleted it even though there are much better answers available now) –  Andreas_D Aug 11 '10 at 8:32

I smell something fishy here.

Are you sure you are not just pushing the envelope too far "just because you should be able to do it"? Are you sure this is the best design pattern you can get? Have you tried refactoring it?

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I had a problem where a superclass would call an top class method that was overridden. This was my workaround...

//THIS WOULD FAIL CALLING SUPERCLASS METHODS AS a1() would invoke top class METHOD

class foo1{
 public void a1(){
  a2();
  }
 public void a2(){}
 }
class foo2 extends foo1{
 {
 public void a1(){
//some other stuff
 super.a1();
 }
 public void a2(){
//some other stuff
 super.a2();
 }

//THIS ENSURES THE RIGHT SUPERCLASS METHODS ARE CALLED //the public methods only call private methods so all public methods can be overridden without effecting the superclass's functionality.

class foo1{
 public void a1(){
  a3();}
 public void a2(){
  a3();}
 private void a3(){
//super class routine
 }
class foo2 extends foo1{
 {
 public void a1(){
//some other stuff
 super.a1();
 }
 public void a2(){
//some other stuff
 super.a2();
 }

I hope this helps. :)

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this doesn't actually answer the question. please reread the question. –  Aboutblank Apr 16 '13 at 16:38

If you got:

Class A { 
    public void foo(){}
}
Class B extends A{
    public void foo(){}
}
Class C extends B{
    public void foo(){}
}
You need to cast yourself in C to A and call the method required. If you are in a c method and need to call A method you can do this: A a = (A) this; a.foo();

Sorry this was in another language. I'm on three works and same time Upss! Very sorry if i confused someone.

Other A posibility is to create a protected method on B that calls A

protected void fooA(){
   super.foo();
}

This method its only visible into the classes that extends B and can be used to the class C to call the method on the class A.

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Re: "You need to cast yourself in C to A and call the method required." - Nope, that's not how dynamic dispatch works. –  polygenelubricants Aug 11 '10 at 7:34
1  
Casting doesn't change which overridden method is called - and indeed it shouldn't, as that would render polymorphism useless. –  Jon Skeet Aug 11 '10 at 7:34
1  
Casting won't work, since when calling a method it always calls the overwritten method of the actual runtime class (in this case C). Calling super in B.foo(), and then super in C.foo() is what you usually do (that would be the right way), to ensure that B gets to run any class specific code, as not to break anything in B that may be inherited by C. But sadly it might not fit what he's trying to do, in which case he'll have to rethink his design. –  Andrei Fierbinteanu Aug 11 '10 at 7:36

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