Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i am writing a program that launches a random file in a directory. the file can be of any time, but mostly video or image files. each time i launch a file i want to close the previous opened one. the code is:

    string FolderSelected = "";
    string FileName = "";
    Process proc;

    List<string> FilesDisplayed = new List<string>();

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (FolderSelected == string.Empty)
            FolderSelected = Properties.Settings.Default.FilesDefaultFolder;

        if (proc != null)
        {
            proc.CloseMainWindow();
            proc.Close();
        }
        FileName = FetchRandomFile();
        proc = Process.Start(FileName);


    }

the problem is, that i keep getting proc = null (the file is launched properly) and i cannot fetch the previously opened process in order to close it. I know that .NET reuses processes and thats why it returns Null but i need to override this behavior. please help, Guy.

share|improve this question
4  
Are you sure your code above is correct? proc will always be null in your example. –  Jason Evans Aug 11 '10 at 7:57

4 Answers 4

EDIT: Thanks to leppie's comment, I suspect I know the answer: my guess is that you're "starting" something like an image, and it's reusing an existing process to open the document instead of creating a new one.

I've reproduced this with this simple test app:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

public class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Process proc = Process.Start("image.tif");
        Console.WriteLine(proc == null);
    }
}

This prints "true" because it's using dllhost.exe to host the Windows Image Viewer, rather than creating a new process.

share|improve this answer
2  
static Process Start(ProcessStartInfo startInfo) can return null, if the process didn't start (or is already started). –  leppie Aug 11 '10 at 8:15
    
@leppie: Thanks, I wasn't aware of that. Will edit. –  Jon Skeet Aug 11 '10 at 8:24
    
I need to override this behavior, because i want to close the last opened file before opening a new one. how can i do this? –  gash25 Aug 11 '10 at 8:36
    
@gash25: I don't think you can. You can use a ProcessStartInfo with UseShellExecute set to false, but I suspect that'll just make it fail to start. If you know which process should be used, you could explicitly start that executable. –  Jon Skeet Aug 11 '10 at 8:40
    
thanks, But finding out which process is too much of a overhead. i just need a simple random open and close file program. –  gash25 Aug 11 '10 at 8:47

You are declaring 'proc' at method scope, so of course it will always be null when checked at the top of that method. If you want the reference to live beyond the function, declare it is a class level variable.

You are spawning a process each time (probably), Process.Start is not returning null, but you simply lose the reference to it when i goes out of scope.

share|improve this answer

That won't even compile (definite assignment). As a method variable, proc is local only to the declaring method(/scope) - i.e. button2_Click, which explains why you can't retain values. If proc is meant to persist between calls, promote it to a field (per-instance variable):

Process proc;
private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (proc != null)
    ...
share|improve this answer

To fix this problem, you have to set UseShellExecute to false to bypass the shell.

Instead of

Process.Start("filename", "args")`

use

Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo() {
    Filename = "filename",
    Arguments = "args",
    UseShellExecute = false
}
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't work in my case. I'm getting exception which says that the file is not a correct Win32 application (in my case it's a video file). This works only with executables. –  P.W. Nov 18 '14 at 19:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.