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Is there a way to print a string of fixed size in reverse without using pointers?

#include<stdio.h>

main()
{
char buffer[10];

scanf("%s", buffer);

// need to print buffer in reverse without using pointers?? 

}
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15  
Is this homework? –  Sjoerd Aug 11 '10 at 10:47
12  
Technically, you've already used a pointer - buffer in this code is implicitly converted to a pointer to its first element when it is evaluated to be passed to scanf(). –  caf Aug 11 '10 at 11:39
    
If this is indeed homework, it's a shame they're trying to teach C without the use of pointers. –  rownage Aug 11 '10 at 16:59
4  
Try turning your monitor around to face the other direction, then use a normal printf. –  bta Aug 11 '10 at 17:05
    
Thank you @caf, you already used pointers! Its funny because its TRUE –  Bob Fincheimer Aug 11 '10 at 20:51
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10 Answers

A lovely K&R function to reverse your string in-place before printing it, perhaps?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void strrev(char *s) {
  int tmp, i, j;
  for (i = 0, j = strlen(s) - 1; i < j; i++, j--) {
    tmp = s[i];
    s[i] = s[j];
    s[j] = tmp;
  }
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[]) {
  char buffer[10];
  scanf("%s", buffer);
  strrev(buffer);
  printf("%s\n", buffer);
  return 0;
}
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nice............... –  yassin Aug 11 '10 at 16:58
    
Do it with XORs and you have a classic interview question/answer. –  Greg D Aug 11 '10 at 21:05
    
@Greg: Yuck, why? :) –  GManNickG Aug 13 '10 at 4:26
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#include<stdio.h>

main()
{
  char buffer[10];

  int n = scanf("%s", buffer);

  // print the number of chars written to buffer
  if (n != EOF) {
    int len = strlen(buffer);
    if (len <= 10) {
      int i;
      for (i = len - 1; i >= 0; i--)
        printf("%c", buffer[i]);  
    } 
  }
}
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8  
-1 for giving an answer without any comment and that doesn't take into account the fact that the string that is read might be shorter than 9 characters. If you answer homework-type questions answer them correctly and such that the OP at least has a chance to learn something. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 11 '10 at 11:43
1  
scanf() returns the number of input items assigned (here EOF, 0 or 1), not the length of the string. –  schot Aug 11 '10 at 11:52
    
@schot: true, changed some, thanks –  Key Aug 11 '10 at 12:06
3  
@Key, but but but OMG the [] is a syntax sugar for the pointer arithmetic!!! Proper answer probably should be "you can't do it in C without pointer". BTW you miss the 0th (the very first) character in the buffer. It should be i >= 0, not i > 0, in the loop. –  Dummy00001 Aug 11 '10 at 13:03
2  
@Jens: Or answer them incorrectly so that the OP learns to either (A) own up to it being homework or (B) pull out their textbook and read it. –  Greg D Aug 11 '10 at 21:04
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Since [] is just syntactic sugar for pointers, here's a version that works completely without pointers, arrays or anything else, just one single int. You didn't say that the string has to be stored somehow. :) (Note that I use fgetc instead of a buffer and scanf).

[jkramer/sgi5k:.../c]# cat rev.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void read_print();

int main(void) {
        fputs("Enter your string, yo! ", stdout);

        read_print();

        fputs("\nDone!\n", stdout);

        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

void read_print() {
        int c = fgetc(stdin);

        if(c != EOF && c != '\n') {
                read_print();
                fputc(c, stdout);
        }
}
[jkramer/sgi5k:.../c]# gcc -o rev rev.c -Wall -W -Os
[jkramer/sgi5k:.../c]# ./rev 
Enter your string, yo! foobar
raboof
Done!
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Here's a recursive way of doing it; technically, this is using a pointer, but I wouldn't go into language-lawyer mode with such simple tasks.

#include <stdio.h>
/* If you want it printed forward, or backward, or think of another way.. */
typedef enum {
    FRONT = 1,
    BACK,
} direction;

/* Technically still using a pointer...don't nitpick. */
void echo_string(char buffer[], size_t buflen, direction from)
{
    /* An index into the buffer to echo, which will preserve
     * its value across subsequent recursive calls.
     */
    static size_t index = 0;
    /* According to the specified direction, print from the front
     * or the back of the buffer. Advance the index (a misnomer, I guess).
     */
    if(from == FRONT) {
        printf("%c", buffer[index++]);
    }
    else {
        printf("%c", buffer[buflen - ++index]);
    }
    /* Are there any more characters to echo? Yes? Awesome! */
    if(index != buflen) {
        echo_string(buffer, buflen, from);
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char buffer[10];
    scanf("%s", buffer);
    /* Better strlen() than sizeof() here,
     * but BEWARE! scanf() is DANGEROUS!
     */
    echo_string(buffer, strlen(buffer), BACK);
    return(0);
}
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+1 for unnecessary use of recursion! –  Brian Postow Aug 11 '10 at 21:05
add comment
 reverse(char c[], int len)
 {
       if( ! (len / 2))
          return;
       char t =  c[0];   
       c[0] = c[len--];  
       c[len] = t;
       reverse(c, len-1);
 }

The error(s) is left as an exercise to the student.

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As caf pointed out, we're still using pointers..!

Here's an other way to solve the problem (of reversing a string). This code snippet (and probably most others) don't respect stuff like utf8. I think signines post demonstrating the K&R way was quite close to mine (:D) so I adapted mine to fit that example (and corrected some things..)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void strrev(char *s) {

 size_t len = strlen(s) + 1;
 size_t i, j;

 for(i = 0; i < len / 2; i++) {

  j = len-1 - i-1;

  char tmp = s[j];
  s[j] = s[i];
  s[i] = tmp;

 }

}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[]) {
 char buffer[10];

 scanf("%s", buffer); // Look out for an overflow ;)
 strrev(buffer);
 puts(buffer);

 return(0);
}
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You can use strrev to reverse a string.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

main()
{
    char buffer[10];

    scanf("%s", buffer);

    strrev(buffer);
    printf("%s", buffer);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for actually including a comment explaining your method (although one that could be fleshed out a little!) rather than just splurging code. –  Stephen Aug 11 '10 at 10:57
4  
-1. strrev is non-standard. If you have such a function, it's pure luck, and there's an excellent chance it would be unavailable on the OP's system (whatever it is). –  Nicholas Knight Aug 11 '10 at 10:59
2  
@Nicholas: Thanks for adding this information. Although it might be better to try using strrev than to implement it on one’s own. For example, the current best answer (for (i = 9…) is not working with strings at all, but with char arrays. If the string terminated at buffer[3] with a null byte, that solution would start dumping arbitrary memory. –  Scytale Aug 11 '10 at 11:11
    
@scytale: I concur that my answer isn't fail-safe. Returned value from scanf should be used to only print the chars set by scanf. –  Key Aug 11 '10 at 11:42
add comment
void outstrreverse(const char s[])
{
    size_t l=strlen(s);
    while( l && s!=&s[--l] )
        putchar(s[l]);
    if(s[0])
        putchar(s[0]);
}
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Because of the relationship between C strings, arrays, and pointers the exercise is rather shotty IMHO - the most idiomatic description of a "String" in C is represented by the char*, which is not an array. Your (the OPs) title and post differ in their definitions between string and char[fixed length].

The OP should read and understand this FAQ entry, and between that and the posts here: easily figure out a solution—as well as defend it to the teacher/judge if need be.

I'll comment on this: never use scanf("%s", buffer) to populate a fixed length string. If you must use scanf() to do it, please use a field width specifier: e.g. scanf("%9s", buffer); if buffer is an [10], you want a specifier of 9 because of how scanf fills the buffer: otherwise you must beware the dragons! You could also scanf by character and evade the issue with a loops bounds, but that would likely be less efficient.

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#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>

void reverse(char a[], int s, int sc );

void reverse(char a[], int s, int sc ){

if ((sc-s)<(s-1))
{
a[sc-s]^=a[s-1];
a[s-1]^=a[sc-s];
a[sc-s]^=a[s-1];
reverse (a, s-1, sc) ;

}

}

void main (){


char a[]="ABCDEFG";

reverse(a, 7, 7);
printf("%d",a);
getch(); //i just use it to freeze the screen

}
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6  
-1 for not formatting code and using cout in C program. –  SigTerm Aug 11 '10 at 12:04
5  
And for using the wrong return type for main, the wrong conversion specifier for printf(), the non-standard conio.h and getch(), no newline in printf(), and the horrible XOR swap "technique". –  Robert Gamble Aug 11 '10 at 12:30
    
+1 for using recursion –  yassin Aug 11 '10 at 16:59
    
+1 for using the horrible XOR swap "technique" –  Greg D Aug 11 '10 at 21:06
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