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I am working on a small program which aims to modify my main, top-level application binary file post-build. In order to fully automate the process, I need to obtain a valid path to the binary, e. g. ../debug/application.exe or ../release/application.exe.

My problem is, that I need to get the binary path independently of the build mode. While my project can be built as a release or debug version, my path to application.exe needs to be irrelevant.

So I found out that I actually can obtain the vaild path programmaticaly, with the use of Visual Studio 2010 SDK. I just need to get configuration values set by user within the IDE; e. g. release and debug mode and it's proper binary.exe path and code them.

There's a library found in VS2010SDK which can make it possible. It operates on DTE object which can manipulate automation model as a whole. I'm rather unexperienced in SDK part of Visual Studio 2010, I could use a tip or two; a person who points me the way where to start digging.

Could you possibly help me with this?

My IDE of choice is obviously Visual Studio 2010 and project itself is written in C# 4.

I wish you all best,

Pawel

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1 Answer 1

Install DxCore and use the term "EnvDTE" in your internet searches. For example, to discover API calls dealing with solutions, search "EnvDTE solutions" in your favorite search engine.

Here's some sample code that shows how to determine which build is being targeted and how to switch to the "release" build:

// switch the configuration to "release"
EnvDTE.Solution solution = CodeRush.Solution.Active;

if (solution.SolutionBuild.ActiveConfiguration.Name != "Release")
{
    solution.SolutionBuild.SolutionConfigurations.Item("Release").Activate();
}
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