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I'm writing an app that has it's own text input, overriding the usual keyboard. I want to include some kind of word completition. It would, for obvious reasons, be best, if I wouldn't have to supply my own dictionary, but instead could use the one already in place.

Does anyone know how to access this dictionary? Is it even possible? And if it is: what capabilities does it have?

Thanks in advance

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I have given up on this one. It would have been nice, but I guess I have to supply my own dictionary. –  Bujtor Aug 30 '10 at 9:16

2 Answers 2

Hi I am looking for the same - so far unsuccessful though. What I found however is the T9 algorithm in C. What you would need is the dictionary database which you could create from a dictionary file such as dict.cc's or use Arun Prabhakar's sampel dictionary.

Hope this helped.

See code from Arun Prabhakar's website bleow (I am not the author of this code!):

    /*
t9.c
Dependency : t9.dic
A file with lots of words to populate our t9 trie structure.
All in small letter no spaces no other characters
Terminated by a line with only a 0 (zero)
=================
*/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct t9
{
 struct t9 * node[27];
};

struct t9 * t9_new()
{
 struct t9 * r =  (struct t9 *)malloc(sizeof(struct t9));

 int i=0;
 for(;i<27;i++) r->node[i] = (struct t9 *)0;

 return r;
}

void t9_free(struct t9 * root)
{
 if(root)
 {
  int i=0;
  for(;i<27;i++)
   t9_free(root->node[i]);
  free(root);
 }
}

struct t9 * t9_insert(struct t9 * root ,char *val)
{

 if(!root){ root = t9_new(); }

 if(!*val) return root;
 *val |= ('A' ^ 'a');
 char c = *val - 'a';
        root->node[c] = t9_insert(root->node[c] ,++val);

 return root;
}

void t9_print(char *pre, struct t9 * root,int depth)
{
 int i=0,flag=0;
 for(;i<27;i++)
 {
  if(root->node[i])
  {
   pre[depth]='a'+i;flag=1;
   t9_print(pre,root->node[i],depth+1);
   pre[depth]=0;
  }
 }
 if(flag == 0)
 {
  pre[depth]=0;
  printf("%s\n",pre);
 }
}

int in_mob_ks(struct t9 * root,char val,int o)
{

 int a[]={0,3,6,9,12,15,19,22,26};
 /* 2=>0 1 2 
    3=>3 4 5
    4=>6 7 8
    5=>9 10 11
    6=>12 13 14
    7=>15 16 17 18
    8=>19 20 21
    9=>22 23 24 25
  */
 if(o && o>=a[val+1]) return -1;


 int s=o?o:a[val];
 int e=a[val+1];
 //printf("From %d-%d",s,e);
 for(;s<e;s++)
  if(root->node[s])
   return s;
 return -1;
}

void t9_search_mob(char *pre, struct t9 * root,int depth,char *val)
{

 if(*(val+depth)==0)
 {
  pre[depth]=0;
  t9_print(pre,root,depth);
  return;
 }

 int i=in_mob_ks(root,*(val+depth)-'2',0);
 if(i==-1)
 {
  pre[depth]=0;
  //printf("%s\n",pre);
 }
 while(i>=0)
 {
  pre[depth]=i+'a';
  t9_search_mob(pre,root->node[i],depth+1,val);
  pre[depth]=0;
  i=in_mob_ks(root,*(val+depth)-'2',i+1);
 }
}


struct t9 * t9_search(struct t9 * root, char *val)
{
 while(*val)
 {
  if(root->node[*val-'a'])
  {
   root = root->node[*val-'a'];
   val++;
  }
  else return NULL;
 }
 return root;
}

int main()
{
 struct t9 * root = (struct t9 *) 0;
 char a[100],b[100];int i;
 FILE *fp = fopen("t9.dic","r");
 while(!feof(fp))
 {
  fscanf(fp,"%s",&a);
  if(a[0]=='0')break;
  root=t9_insert(root,a);
 }

 while(1)
 {
  printf("mob keys 2-9:");
  scanf("%s",&a);
  if(a[0]=='0')break;
  t9_search_mob(b,root,0,a);
 }
 t9_free(root);
}
share|improve this answer

If you just need spell-checking capabilities, maybe you can use UITextChecker ?

In the past I needed quick access to a full-blown dictionary and my solution was to embed an offline dictionary inside my app. I later turned it into a static library that others can use (for a small fee). It doesn't have "predictive" capabilities, but if you do need a full-blown dictionary you can check it out at www.lexicontext.com

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