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I'm trying to pass some parameter to a function used as callback, how can I do that?

function tryMe (param1, param2) {
    alert (param1 + " and " + param2);
}

function callbackTester (callback, param1, param2) {
    callback (param1, param2);
}

callbackTester (tryMe, "hello", "goodbye");
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6  
What you are doing should work. What problems do you have? –  Daniel Vassallo Aug 11 '10 at 13:08
1  
Your code works fine, what is the problem? –  Sarfraz Aug 11 '10 at 13:09
1  
It should work... jsfiddle.net/QXQZj –  Hristo Aug 11 '10 at 13:09
    
sorry it was my fault on main code syntax, I thought was this because this is the first time I use a callback in JavaScript –  Vittorio Vittori Aug 11 '10 at 13:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 52 down vote accepted

If you want something slightly more general, you can use the arguments variable like so:

function tryMe (param1, param2) {
    alert(param1 + " and " + param2);
}

function callbackTester (callback) {
    callback (arguments[1], arguments[2]);
}

callbackTester (tryMe, "hello", "goodbye");

But otherwise, your example works fine (arguments[0] can be used in place of callback in the tester)

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13  
So long as we're being in the spirit of being general, callback.apply(arguments) as the function body for callbackTester is extensible beyond the two argument scenario. –  Steven Xu Aug 11 '10 at 13:15
    
sorry, it was a syntax error in the main code, I thought was this because this is the first time I use a callback in JavaScript, you've helped me to understand it wasn't the probelm, and to see a great example. –  Vittorio Vittori Aug 11 '10 at 13:17

This would also work:

// callback function
function tryMe (param1, param2) { 
    alert (param1 + " and " + param2); 
} 

// callback executer 
function callbackTester (callback) { 
    callback(); 
} 

// test function
callbackTester (function() {
    tryMe("hello", "goodbye"); 
}); 
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9  
+1. Passing in closures/anonymous functions is the best way. –  Ganesh Krishnan Aug 23 '12 at 6:38
    
How would you clearInterval then? –  Jonas Gröger May 4 at 16:47
    
This works great because it also allows the anonymous function to pass in parameters like so: callbackTester (function(data) {tryMe(data, "hello", "goodbye"); }); –  Michael Khalili Jul 14 at 2:28

Your question is unclear. If you're asking how you can do this in a simpler way, you should take a look at the ECMAScript 5th edition method .bind(), which is a member of Function.prototype. Using it, you can do something like this:

function tryMe (param1, param2) {
    alert (param1 + " and " + param2);
}

function callbackTester (callback) {
    callback();
}

callbackTester(tryMe.bind(null, "hello", "goodbye"));

You can also use the following code, which adds the method if it isn't available in the current browser:

// From Prototype.js
if (!Function.prototype.bind) { // check if native implementation available
  Function.prototype.bind = function(){ 
    var fn = this, args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments),
        object = args.shift(); 
    return function(){ 
      return fn.apply(object, 
        args.concat(Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments))); 
    }; 
  };
}

Example

bind() - PrototypeJS Documentation

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Out of interest, what's the difference between Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments) and arguments.slice()? –  sje397 Aug 11 '10 at 13:19
4  
@sje397: arguments isn't a *real* array, so it doesn't have a slice() method. However, the slice() method on the Array.prototype is intentionally generic, so you can pass any object that has numerical indexes and a length property and it will work. –  Andy E Aug 11 '10 at 13:25
    
Aha. Cheers.... –  sje397 Aug 11 '10 at 16:13

Wrap the 'child' function(s) being passed as/with arguments within function wrappers to prevent them being evaluated when the 'parent' function is called.

function outcome(){
    return false;
}

function process(callbackSuccess, callbackFailure){
    if ( outcome() )
        callbackSuccess();
    else
        callbackFailure();
}

process(function(){alert("OKAY");},function(){alert("OOPS");})
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When you have a callback that will be called by something other than your code with a specific number of params and you want to pass in additional params you can pass a wrapper function as the callback and inside the wrapper pass the additional param(s).

function login(accessedViaPopup) {
    //pass FB.login a call back function wrapper that will accept the
    //response param and then call my "real" callback with the additional param
    FB.login(function(response){
        fb_login_callback(response,accessedViaPopup);
    });
}

//handles respone from fb login call
function fb_login_callback(response, accessedViaPopup) {
    //do stuff
}
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