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Markup:

<div class="foo">
    <img src="loading.gif" class="loading" style="display: none;" />
</div>

Js:

$("div[class='foo']").click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $(this).hide();
    $(/* somehow select the loading img of exactly this div with class foo (not others) */).show();
});
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3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted
$("div[class='foo']").click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $(this).hide();
    $('img.loading', this).show();
});
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1  
Wow! You can pass context to the $-selector! Nice. –  randomguy Aug 11 '10 at 13:37
1  
@randomguy: Selector context maps to the find() method, so $('img.loading', this) is the same as $(this).find('img.loading'). Selector context is much "nicer", I think. –  Andy E Aug 11 '10 at 13:41
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If you want any descendant of the given element you can use find():

$(this).find(".foo");

If you know you only want to search for the first-level children elements, you can use children():

$(this).children(".foo");
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You could use

$(this).find("img").show();

or

$(this).find("img.loading").show();
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