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I'm trying to get the following C++ code running:

#include <cmath>

template<typename T, bool> class ConditionalData {
};

template <typename T> class ConditionalData<T, false> {
};

template <typename T> class ConditionalData<T, true> {
private:
    T data;
public:
    void setData(T _data) { data = _data; }
};


template<bool hasdata> class A {
public:
    A() {
        ConditionalData<double,hasdata> data;
        if (hasdata) {
            data.setData(sin(cos(123.4)));
        }
    }
};


int main(int argNum, const char**argData) {
    A<false> test1;
    A<true> test2;
    return 0;
}

Essentially, I want to implement a templated class A in which certain operations are executed depending on the template parameter. These operations need local variables, which I only want to be allocated if needed. The problem that I'm having here is that the body of the

if (hasdata) {
    data.setData(3);
}

condition is also instantiated for hasdata=false, which does not compile (using g++ 5.2). Any ideas how to get this done in the cleanest way without splitting the body of A::A() into pieces?

The source code above is a minimal non-working example. The real implementation for A::A() is relatively long, with the parts dependent on "hasdata" being distributed evenly over the code. Also, the "typename T" for which the class A will be used is a relatively complex class with heavy-weight constructors/destructors, so I want the instances of T to only be allocated when hasdata=true. Finally, in the data.setData(...) calls, there can be complex computations in the "...", which should only be performed if needed.

share|improve this question
    
"relatively long, with the parts dependent on "hasdata" being distributed evenly over the code". Then perhaps rethink your attitude towards promoting such parts to separate functions. – n.m. Jan 4 at 10:58
    
The thing is that separate functions would actually make the code a lot harder to read. Each of the separate functions would only ever called once, and there is an accompanying paper in which the function is explained as a block (as it is easier to read in this way). – DCTLib Jan 4 at 11:39
up vote 11 down vote accepted

If you can afford for C++14, you can express the conditional branches as generic lambdas. The benefit is that they capture surrounding variables and the solution doesn't require extra member functions.

template <bool> struct tag {};

template <typename T, typename F>
auto static_if(tag<true>, T t, F f) { return t; }

template <typename T, typename F>
auto static_if(tag<false>, T t, F f) { return f; }

template <bool B, typename T, typename F>
auto static_if(T t, F f) { return static_if(tag<B>{}, t, f); }

template <bool B, typename T>
auto static_if(T t) { return static_if(tag<B>{}, t, [](auto&&...){}); }

// ...

ConditionalData<int, hasdata> data;        
static_if<hasdata>([&](auto& d)
{
    d.setData(3);
})(data);

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
This! Lambdas are a very nice way of achieving low-overhead lazy computations while retaining the logical in-place. I would maybe provide a specialized conditionally_invoke_on method to wrap the static_if invocation: conditionally_invoke_on(data, [&](....) {}); is more specialized but avoids this weird "data is passed at the end" syntax and the repetition of the hasdata bit which can be deduced by taking data in argument. You can rip it off from here if you wish. – Matthieu M. Jan 4 at 19:41

This is a common pattern, so there's actually a paper to add constexpr_if to C++. If that makes it in to future versions, it would allow you to keep your code pretty much as-is.

template<bool hasdata> class A {
public:
    A() {
        ConditionalData<int,hasdata> data;
        constexpr_if (hasdata) {
        //^^^^^^^^^^ instead of plain if
            data.setData(3);
        }
    }
};

For now, you'll need to make do with one of the other answers.

share|improve this answer
1  
Ah, I see. So perhaps in future version.... Thanks for your answer! – DCTLib Jan 4 at 11:43
1  
I wonder why they didn't say static if`` (avoiding any new keywords) or static_if` (in the vein of static_assert)... – Deduplicator Jan 4 at 16:33
    
@Deduplicator beats me. I guess the single token is to ease parsing. It used to be called static_if, but they changed it. – TartanLlama Jan 4 at 17:18
1  
That's horrible :( – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 4 at 19:00
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: and as demonstrated by Piotr (currently below), it's easy enough to do with the existing facilities, and could conceivably be provided by a library (taking a lambda) rather than a language facility. – Matthieu M. Jan 4 at 19:43

First of all, you don't require 3 versions of class ConditionalData, because bool can be either true or false. So let me simplify it as following:

template<typename T, bool = false> class ConditionalData {
};                 //^^^^^^^^^^^^

template <typename T> class ConditionalData<T, true> {
private:
    T data;
public:
    void setData(T _data) { data = _data; }
};

Secondly, to answer your question: Whichever members are falling for false category, just overload them outside the class body as following:

template<bool hasdata> class A { 
public:
    A() {
        ConditionalData<int,hasdata> data;
        if (hasdata) {
            data.setData(3);
        }
    }   
};

template<> A<false>::A() {}  // Does nothing for `false` condition
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your note on the non-necessity of the three versions. Having two specializations for the A constructor is a bit problematic, though, as written in the question post, its actual code (not the example code above) is actually quite long (~200 lines), and only a small fraction is dependent on "hasData". That would mean replicating ~190 lines. – DCTLib Jan 4 at 11:37
    
@DCTLib, that can be fixed trivially. Move the specific code related to hasData to some function, e.g. hasDataRelated() and then overload only that function as I have done for A(). Repeat such procedure for all the bool specific code. – iammilind Jan 4 at 11:55
    
That's a nice idea. Thanks for suggesting it. – DCTLib Jan 4 at 12:38

you can define setData for both branches, empty one for false condition:

template<typename T, bool> class ConditionalData {
};

template <typename T> class ConditionalData<T, false> {
    void setData(T _data) {}
};

template <typename T> class ConditionalData<T, true> {
private:
    T data;
public:
    void setData(T _data) { data = _data; }
};

template<bool hasdata> class A {
public:
    A() {
        ConditionalData<int,hasdata> data;
        data.setData(3);
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Though technically this approach is correct, there is a problem here. If some substantial code is being run in the constructor of data (which is not present in the example code), then creating an object data just do nothing in setData() would be an overkill. Better approach is to overload A<false>::A() and keep it empty. Look at my answer below. – iammilind Jan 4 at 11:12
    
@iammilind it's definitely not overkill as these empty members and empty specializations will be removed by the compiler. – bolov Jan 4 at 11:23
1  
Thanks for your answer. The thing is that the above code is actually a simplication of what happens in reality. There can be calls such as "data.setData(...complex_calculation...)" and I don't want the calculation to take place if not needed. – DCTLib Jan 4 at 11:40
    
@bolov, I don't think the compiler optimization is guaranteed. e.g. If you put a debug/print statement inside the constructor of ConditionalData, it's always going to instantiate the constructor and create the object data and then do nothing in setData(). – iammilind Jan 4 at 11:49
1  
@iammilind why would you put a print in the constructor of ConditionalData<false> ? – bolov Jan 4 at 11:52

If you cannot(/don't want to) change ConditionalData, you may create 2 methods instead:

template<typename T>
void SetData(ConditionalData<T, false>& , const T& ) {/* Nothing */}

template<typename T>
void SetData(ConditionalData<T, true>& c, const T& value) { c.setData(value); }

and then

A() {
    ConditionalData<int, hasdata> data;
    SetData(data, 3);
}

For more complex cases

template<typename T>
void A_impl_part1(ConditionalData<T, false>&) {/* Nothing */}

template<typename T>
void A_impl_part1(ConditionalData<T, true>& c) { c.setData(3); }

and then

A() {
    ConditionalData<int, hasdata> data;
    A_impl_part1(data);
    // common part
    // A_impl_part2(data); // and so on
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. The thing is that the above code is actually a simplification of what happens in reality. There can be calls such as "data.setData(...complex_calculation...)" and I don't want the calculation to take place if not needed. – DCTLib Jan 4 at 11:43
    
@DCTLib: add example for non-trivial case. – Jarod42 Jan 4 at 11:48
3  
@DCTLib You are adding constraints that are not visible in the question, so please update your question. – Werner Henze Jan 4 at 12:04
    
@WernerHenze Indeed - I forgot to list that in the original post. I've updated it accordingly. – DCTLib Jan 4 at 12:39

You can use the preprocessor to 'generate' each variation of your class as template specializations.

First, the 'template' header we will generate the specializations from:

ATemplate.h
//no include guards to allow multiple inclusion
template<>
class A<A_HAS_DATA>
{
public:
    A()
    {
#if A_HAS_DATA
        double data;
        if (hasdata) {
            data = sin(cos(123.4));
        }
#endif
    }
}

Then we actually generate each specialization to obtain a normal header to use in your code:

A.h
#pragma once

template<bool hasdata>
class A;

//Generate specialization for hasdata = true
#define A_HAS_DATA 1
#include "ATemplate.h"
#undef A_HAS_DATA
//(undef avoids redefinition warning)
//Generate specialization for hasdata = false
#define A_HAS_DATA 0
#include "ATemplate.h"
#undef A_HAS_DATA

Essentially, instead of manually writing each specialization for each possible case (given that you might have multiple such settings to include/exclude stuff), we use preprocessor to generate each variant by including a header multiple times, each time with a different value for preprocessor define(s) to get different result.

Prefer to use normal template approaches when they work, but if the amount of manual code duplication (to define all the possible variants) grows too high, this approach can work (as you can specify everything 'inline' akin what static if would do if we had one)

share|improve this answer
    
-1: C++ has been trying to move away from the preprocessor for years. There is no reason to use it if the language supports an alternative. – isanae Jan 4 at 15:43
    
Exactly, an alternative. For the example in the question pure templates probably work fine, but once you go further (more flags, more bits and pieces to conditionally include), you have to reevaluate the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches against each other. Having your code readable and not having to repeat yourself all over the place are reasons to use this solution when the template alternative shows its inability to scale. – Waterlimon Jan 4 at 17:31
    
@isanae macros and the preprocessor are not evil. Just because there are alternatives does not make this solution somehow worse. – Alice Jan 5 at 2:54
    
@Alice Yes, I believe it does. It doesn't make it invalid, but it does make it worse. – isanae Jan 5 at 2:58
    
@isanae Okay. You are free to have a opinion, no matter how wrong it is. But that doesn't mean your statement There is no reason to use it if the language supports an alternative. has any validity. – Alice Jan 25 at 23:46

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