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I have two tables tabData and tabDataDetail. I want all idData(PK) from Parent-Table(tabData) that have only rows in Child-Table(tabDataDetail, FK is fiData) with:

  • fiActionCode=11 alone or
  • fiactionCode=11 and fiActionCode=34

Any other combination is invalid. How to get them?

What i've tried without success(slow and gives me also rows that have only fiActioncode 34) :

alt text

Thanks for your Time.


EDIT: Thanks to all for their answers. Now i unfortunately have not enough time to check which one is best or works at all. I marked the first working one as answer.

EDIT2: i think that the marked answer is really the most efficient and compact solution.

EDIT3: Codesleuth's answer is interesting because it returns only rows than have only a single fiActionCode=11. Difficult to see, because that its only true for 20 tabDataDetail-rows ot of 41524189 total-rows that have two. Anyway that was not 100% what i've asked or rather what i was looking for.

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It is never mentioned what columns are needed in the output. Is it just tabData columns or is any data from tabDataDetail required? –  Thomas Aug 11 '10 at 15:26
    
It is only the primary key(idData) that interests me and should be grouped(and ordered) by (if necessary). But to check the result it is better to have fiActionCode also. –  Tim Schmelter Aug 11 '10 at 15:45
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
Select ...
From tabData As T1
Where Exists    (
                Select 1
                From tabDataDetail As TDD1
                Where TDD1.fiData = T1.idData
                    And TDD1.fiactionCode = 11
                )
    And Not Exists    (
                      Select 1
                      From tabDataDetail As TDD1
                      Where TDD1.fiData = T1.idData
                          And TDD1.fiactionCode Not In(11,34)
                    )

To expand on my logic, the first check (a correction) is to ensure that a row with fiActionCode = 11 exists. The second check works by first defining the set of rows we do not want. We do not want anything that is something other than fiActionCode = 11 or 34. Because that is the set of items we do not want, we search for anything that does not exist in that set.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks. But that gives me also the rows that have only 34 as fiActionCode in Childtable. These should be excluded. –  Tim Schmelter Aug 11 '10 at 15:10
    
@Tim - Fixed. Just need an additional check to ensure that fiActionCode = 11 exists. –  Thomas Aug 11 '10 at 15:15
    
PK is idData and tablename is tabData but apart from that it seems to work(i don't knwo why). I get 400k rows so its difficult to check. –  Tim Schmelter Aug 11 '10 at 15:26
    
@Tim - A simple verification check would be to determine if any resulting row has a tabDataDetail row with an fiActionCode value equal to something other than 34 (we know it must have a row with a value = 11). Just adding an inner join to tabDataDetail would make a visual inspection easier. –  Thomas Aug 11 '10 at 15:29
    
@Thomas: super efficient, nice one! –  Codesleuth Aug 11 '10 at 15:36
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Reasoning

  1. LEFT OUTER JOIN excludes all idData's that have an id different from 11 or 34
  2. HAVING excludes all idData's that only have a 34
  3. Remaining records (should) satisfy all constraints

Test data

DECLARE @tabData TABLE (idData INTEGER)
DECLARE @tabDataDetail TABLE (fiData INTEGER, fiActionCode INTEGER)

INSERT INTO @tabData VALUES (1)
INSERT INTO @tabData VALUES (2)
INSERT INTO @tabData VALUES (3)
INSERT INTO @tabData VALUES (4)
INSERT INTO @tabData VALUES (5)

/* Only idData 1 & 2 should be returned */
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail VALUES (1, 11)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail VALUES (2, 11)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail VALUES (2, 34)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail VALUES (3, 99)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail VALUES (4, 11)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail VALUES (4, 99)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail VALUES (5, 34)

Query

SELECT  *
FROM    @tabData d
        INNER JOIN @tabDataDetail dd ON dd.fiData = d.idData
        INNER JOIN (
          SELECT  idData
          FROM    @tabData d
                  INNER JOIN @tabDataDetail dd ON dd.fiData = d.idData
                  LEFT OUTER JOIN (
                    SELECT  fiData
                    FROM    @tabDataDetail
                    WHERE   fiActionCode NOT IN (11, 34)
                  ) exclude ON exclude.fiData = d.idData
          WHERE   exclude.fiData IS NULL                
          GROUP BY
                  idData
          HAVING  MIN(fiActionCode) = 11        
        ) include ON include.idData = d.idData
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but i get several 'The multi-part identifier "d.idData" could not be bound.' and 'Ambiguous column name' –  Tim Schmelter Aug 11 '10 at 15:15
    
Have you removed the @? The query runs without problems on my system. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Aug 11 '10 at 15:19
    
Works too(somewhat slow). Thanks –  Tim Schmelter Aug 12 '10 at 8:17
    
@Tim, proper indexing might go a long way to speed it up, but it will be hard (if not impossible) to beat Thomas' NOT EXISTS solution. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Aug 12 '10 at 8:54
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Edited my answer based on clarification given in comments on other answers.

select td.idData
 from tabData td
  left join tabDataDetail tdd
   on td.idData = tdd.fiData
    and tdd.fiActionCode = 11
  left join tabDataDetail tdd2
   on td.idData = tdd2.fiData
    and tdd2.fiActionCode = 34
  left join tabDataDetail tdd3
   on td.idData = tdd3.fiData
    and tdd3.fiActionCode not in (11,34)
 where (tdd.fiData is not null
  or (tdd.fiData is not null and tdd2.fiData is not null))
  and tdd3.fiData is null
 group by td.idData
share|improve this answer
    
Also correct result. This method("null-check") is new to me. –  Tim Schmelter Aug 12 '10 at 8:13
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Edit : Apols - I see what you mean with child rows. This isn't particular efficient. Thanks also to Lieven for the data.

SELECT idData FROM
tabData td
WHERE EXISTS 
(
    SELECT 1 
        FROM tabDataDetail tdd 
        WHERE tdd.fiData = td.idData AND fiActionCode = 11
 )
AND NOT EXISTS
(
    SELECT 1 
        FROM tabDataDetail tdd 
        WHERE tdd.fiData = td.idData AND fiActionCode <> 11
 )
UNION
SELECT idData 
    FROM tabData td
    WHERE EXISTS 
    (
        SELECT 1 
            FROM tabDataDetail tdd 
            WHERE tdd.fiData = td.idData AND fiActionCode = 11
     )
    AND EXISTS
    (
        SELECT 1 
            FROM tabDataDetail tdd 
            WHERE tdd.fiData = td.idData AND fiActionCode = 34
     )
AND NOT EXISTS
(
    SELECT 1 
        FROM tabDataDetail tdd 
        WHERE tdd.fiData = td.idData AND fiActionCode NOT IN (11, 34)
 )
share|improve this answer
    
That works too. –  Tim Schmelter Aug 11 '10 at 15:33
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Thanks @Lieven for the data code to test this:

DECLARE @tabData TABLE (idData INTEGER)
DECLARE @tabDataDetail TABLE (idDataDetail int IDENTITY(1,1),
    fiData INTEGER, fiActionCode INTEGER)

INSERT INTO @tabData VALUES (1)
INSERT INTO @tabData VALUES (2)
INSERT INTO @tabData VALUES (3)
INSERT INTO @tabData VALUES (4)
INSERT INTO @tabData VALUES (5)

/* Only idData 1 & 2 should be returned */
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail (fiData,fiActionCode) VALUES (1, 11)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail (fiData,fiActionCode) VALUES (2, 11)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail (fiData,fiActionCode) VALUES (2, 34)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail (fiData,fiActionCode) VALUES (3, 99)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail (fiData,fiActionCode) VALUES (4, 11)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail (fiData,fiActionCode) VALUES (4, 99)
INSERT INTO @tabDataDetail (fiData,fiActionCode) VALUES (5, 34)

Query:

SELECT  td.idData
FROM    @tabData td
        INNER JOIN @tabDataDetail tdd ON td.idData = tdd.fiData
WHERE   tdd.fiActionCode = 11 -- check 11 exists
        AND NOT EXISTS ( SELECT * FROM @tabDataDetail WHERE fiData = td.idData
                          AND idDataDetail <> tdd.idDataDetail )
            -- ensures *only* 11 exists (0 results from subquery)
UNION
SELECT  td.idData
FROM    @tabData td
        INNER JOIN @tabDataDetail tdd1 ON td.idData = tdd1.fiData
        INNER JOIN @tabDataDetail tdd2 ON td.idData = tdd2.fiData
WHERE   tdd1.fiActionCode = 11 -- check 11 exists
        AND tdd2.fiActionCode = 34 -- check 34 exists

Returns:

idData
-----------
1
2

(2 row(s) affected)

With only 1 subquery here (and it being a COUNT instead of a very-slow NOT EXISTS) this creates a very neat execution plan which should help if you're having problems with speed.

share|improve this answer
    
@CodeSleuth, don't mention it. The cost according to performance analyzer is 24% for my solution, 32% for your's. I'm interested to know in a real world scenario if that holds. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Aug 11 '10 at 15:16
    
I haven't really looked at the question or this answer in any detail but as a general point NOT EXISTS is more efficient than COUNT(*) in SQL Server as it does an anti semi join. It just has to check that a matching row doesn't exist. Not count all the ones that match. –  Martin Smith Aug 11 '10 at 15:21
    
@Lieven: cost of what? Just the subquery? Sorry I seem to have gotten NOT IN mixed up in my head with NOT EXISTS - I'm wrong, the performance is actually better than the COUNT in my answer. I'll edit it in. Cheers! –  Codesleuth Aug 11 '10 at 15:25
    
@Lieven, @Martin Smith: fixed, sorry about that again :( –  Codesleuth Aug 11 '10 at 15:30
    
The query returns 212040 tabData rows but the correct result should be 212050. I yet dont know why. –  Tim Schmelter Aug 12 '10 at 8:08
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This does it with one pass through the data I think.

It depends on the data distribution whether or not that would be preferable to doing 2 separate lookups.

WITH matches AS
(
SELECT fiData
FROM tabDataDetail 
GROUP BY fiData
HAVING COUNT(CASE WHEN fiactionCode = 11 THEN 1 END) > 0
AND COUNT(CASE WHEN fiactionCode NOT IN (11,34) THEN 1 END) = 0
)
SELECT ...
FROM idData i
JOIN matches m
ON  m.fiData = i.idData
share|improve this answer
    
This works too (when changing 'SELECT ... FROM idData i' to 'SELECT idData FROM tabData i'). Thanks. –  Tim Schmelter Aug 12 '10 at 8:03
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