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I have a problem with an object I have created that looks something like this:

var myObject = {

    AddChildRowEvents: function(row, p2) {
        if(document.attachEvent) {
            row.attachEvent('onclick', function(){this.DoSomething();});
        } else {
            row.addEventListener('click', function(){this.DoSomething();}, false);
        }
    },

    DoSomething: function() {
        this.SomethingElse(); //<-- Error here, object 'this' does not support this method.
    }
}

The problem is that when I am inside the 'DoSomething' function, 'this' does not refer to 'myObject' what am I doing wrong?

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1) stupid question, but does your object have a SomethingElse method? 2) try doing "function() {this.DoSomething(this);}" in the closure, and have DoSomething either take 0 args or 1 arg - see what happens and post your results. –  Claudiu Dec 6 '08 at 7:19
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5 Answers

WHen the function is called, "this" refers to row. If you want to have the object, you can do it something like this: ]

AddChildRowEvents: function(row, p2) {
    var theObj = this;
    if(document.attachEvent) {
         row.attachEvent('onclick', function(){theObj.DoSomething();});
    } else {
         row.addEventListener('click', function(){theObj.DoSomething();}, false);
    }
},

When the function is called, it has access to the variable theOBj which was in scope when the function was defined.

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took me a while to get it - the reason is that row.attachEvent attaches an event to the row, and when that event fires, the row is the one that calls the function (it likely does something like f.apply(this, args)). am i correct? –  Claudiu Dec 20 '08 at 8:40
    
Yes, that's correct. –  Mike Kantor Feb 13 '09 at 21:04
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this always refers to the inner function, if you have nested functions, you have to create another variable and point that to this.

var myObject = {
    AddChildRowEvents: function(row, p2) {
        var that = this;
        if(document.attachEvent) {
            row.attachEvent('onclick', function(){that.DoSomething();});
        } else {
            row.addEventListener('click', function(){that.DoSomething();}, false);
        }
    }
}
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Are you sure that "that = this;" is valid in case of defining it inside object literal? @svinto –  GnrlBzik Jan 4 '13 at 17:27
    
@GnrlBzik: Good catch! It should have a var in front of it. –  svinto May 21 '13 at 18:05
    
dude this is an object, it expects key:value pairs. run this code against jshint.com –  GnrlBzik May 23 '13 at 14:29
1  
It seems I was very tired or something, sorry for the stupidity. –  svinto May 23 '13 at 19:53
    
happens : ) i do it all the time ; ) –  GnrlBzik Jul 26 '13 at 20:03
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This is a common issue with closures. To resolve it try something like this:

var myObject = {    
    AddChildRowEvents: function(row, p2) { 
        var self = this;

        if(document.attachEvent) {            
             row.attachEvent('onclick', function(){this.DoSomething(self);});        
        } else {            
             row.addEventListener('click', function(){this.DoSomething(self);}, false);        
        }    
    },    

    DoSomething: function(self) {       
        self.SomethingElse(); 
    }
}
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3  
FYI, 'self' is a very dangerous variable name in the context of Javascript. Depending on your scope, you may actually be getting a reference to the document.window object. –  Lübnah Sep 5 '12 at 0:06
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The problem with your code is here, in the following line of code you have defined an anonymous function and passed it as an event handler for the onClick event, in the following lines:

    row.attachEvent('onclick', function(){this.DoSomething();});

and

    row.addEventListener('click', function(){this.DoSomething();}, false);

when onclick event raised and it calls the anonymous function that you have passed, this context is referring to the object that has been raised the event, but not myObject. because at this point executing context is in the event handler context.

The solution: you can do the trick that Mike Kantor has been told, or using jQuery, use the proxy method, to define this context in the anonymous function.

So your code would be like this:

var myObject = {

    AddChildRowEvents: function(row, p2) {
        if(document.attachEvent) {
            row.attachEvent('onclick', $.proxy(function () {
                this.DoSomething();
            }, this));
        } else {
            row.addEventListener('click', $.proxy(function () {
                this.DoSomething();
            },this), false);
        }
    },

    DoSomething: function() {
        this.SomethingElse(); //<-- Error here, object 'this' does not support this method.
    }
}

you have mentioned that the error is in this.SomthingElse( ), but your code does not show it. If you really getting error at that line of code, it may you are using the method DoSomthing somewhere else as an event handler.

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I'm not sure what the generic solution is, but Prototype solves this using the bindAsEventListener function. You could either use Prototype, or look at how they implement it.

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