Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a hierarchy of class templates. At the top of the hierarchy is an abstract base class (interface). I won't know which concrete implementation to instantiate until runtime, so it seems like the perfect situation to use the factory pattern. However, virtual member function templates are not allowed in C++.

How can I achieve a legal design similar to the below in C++?

The individual concrete implementations of the IProduct interface as well as the concrete factories will live in different dynamic libraries, one or more of which will be loaded at runtime.

template<class T> class IProduct
{
public:
   virtual void doWork(const T & data) = 0;
};

template<class T> class ProductA : public IProduct<T> {/*...*/};
template<class T> class ProductB : public IProduct<T> {/*...*/};

class IProductFactory
{
public:
   template<class T> virtual IProduct<T> * createProduct() = 0;
};

class ProductAFactory: public IProductFactory
{
public:
   template<class T> virtual IProduct<T> * createProduct()
   {
      return new ProductA<T>;
   }
};

class ProductBFactory: public IProductFactory
{
public:
   template<class T> virtual IProduct<T> * createProduct()
   {
      return new ProductB<T>;
   }
};
share|improve this question
    
What do you use the template parameter for? As shown, it seems like you should just zap it. –  Zack Aug 11 '10 at 17:24
    
@Zack, the template parameter is used as the type for a parameter of one of the functions of the interface. I'll clarify. –  Nick Meyer Aug 11 '10 at 17:28
1  
As described, you're asking for instantiation trouble - somebody's going to have to instantiate ProductA<T>::doWork, ProductB<T>::doWork, etc, for all T required by the main program, and if ProductA, ProductB, etc are hiding in shared libraries, it may not be possible to do so. –  Zack Aug 11 '10 at 18:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why can't you templatize IProductFactory on T as well? That would get rid of your error, and it's no less general. The client is still going to have to know what T is in order to call thecreateProduct method.

Edit Re: comment

In order to do this, you will need to just create a templatized function to create the factory. So:

template<class T> IProductFactory<T>* getProductFactory();

Now your factory is templatized, the createProduct method is no longer a member template. Not sure what your criteria is for returning a ProductAFactory vs. a ProductBFactory but you will either have to pass in a string to choose, have this be a member function of another class that would make the decision, or have multiple free functions but only expose one version or another to a particular client.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, that's the only meaningful solution here. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Aug 11 '10 at 17:35
    
I thought of that too, but isn't that just pushing the problem up to a higher level class? Consider a client that wants to make a IProduct<Foo>. The client still needs to get an appropriate concrete IProductFactory<Foo>, which means there needs to be something that can polymorphically create IProductFactory<T>. Am I missing something? –  Nick Meyer Aug 11 '10 at 17:37

This doesn't need a template. Does that eliminate your problem?

share|improve this answer
    
Please elaborate... how do I eliminate the template parameter from the design? –  Nick Meyer Aug 11 '10 at 17:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.