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I have implemented a very simple method:

private String getProfileName(String path) {
    String testPath = null;
    for (int i = 0; i < path.length(); i++) {
       testPath = path.substring(0, i);
          if ( testPath.endsWith("1") || testPath.endsWith("2") || testPath.endsWith("3") || testPath.endsWith("4") || testPath.endsWith("5") || testPath.endsWith("6") || testPath.endsWith("7") || testPath.endsWith("8") || testPath.endsWith("9") ) {
            break;
          }
    }
    return testPath.substring(0, (testPath.length() - 1));
}

I don't like the whole method because I think it's more complicated than necessary, especially the if condition.

So I thought of a way to refactor this method. First I thought of using Regex to replace the if condition, but isn't regex a little bit too much for this simple case?

Any other ideas how to reafctor this?

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2  
To be clear: you're trying to cut a string at the first non-zero digit? –  Rup Aug 11 '10 at 17:52
2  
Unknown - Rather then just posting code, give a description of what your method precisely does. I as well as others may be turned off by just seeing code without stating what the method does. Provide sample input data and expected results, we aren't mind readers. –  JonH Aug 11 '10 at 17:56
    
Ah yes sry i missed that. But Rup is right! –  anon Aug 11 '10 at 17:57

10 Answers 10

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Use this pattern with a matcher:

"^[^1-9]*"

Example code:

private String getProfileName(String path) {
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("^[^1-9]*");
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(path);
    matcher.find();
    return matcher.group();
}

I think this is much easier to understand than your code. It took me several minutes to work out your logic, and I had to run it to be sure. I think that with a regular expression it is quite clear what the code is doing. If you wish you can compile the regular expression just once and reuse it by moving it to a static member of the class.

Regular expressions have quite a bad stigma on Stack Overflow (mostly from people trying to use them to parse HTML, email addresses, URLs, and all sorts of other nasty inappropriate uses of regular expressions). But for this sort of task a regular expression is just fine.

You may also wish to consider why you are omitting 0 and if that is a good idea.

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3  
Has "don't use regular expressions for parsing html" become the new "don't use tables for layout" where people hear it as "don't use regular expressions, ever!" and "don't use tables, ever!"? –  Edward M Smith Aug 11 '10 at 18:08
    
Thanks for this answer. And yes, I think I will also check for 0. I didn't implement it in my code because 0 should never be included in the String but I think it safer to include 0 in the pattern. –  RoflcoptrException Aug 11 '10 at 18:14
1  
@Mark: You should probably clarify how Pattern.compile need only be done once and its result is cachable in e.g. a static final field, or else people may get the wrong idea that it needs to be compiled at every invocation. I don't think performance is an issue (see my answer) but it could be misleading nonetheless. –  polygenelubricants Aug 11 '10 at 18:44
1  
@polygenelubricants: Point noted. Generally I prefer not to make these types of optimizations unless the profiler shows a problem, as there is a (small) readability hit - the pattern is no longer defined where it is used. Thanks for the comment. –  Mark Byers Aug 11 '10 at 18:56
1  
I believe to match the original code, the last character needs to be lopped off the string. / Of course the code should probably have more validation in it, which as ever makes using a regex less appropriate. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 11 '10 at 19:16

I'd say go with the regex. I can't think of a simpler way to refactor it. I can probably think of more complicated ways, but I don't think you'd want that.

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This reminds me of: codinghorror.com/blog/2008/06/…. See Tom's answer for a simpler way to refactor. –  Aryabhatta Aug 11 '10 at 18:01

You can create a method like this to put inside your if

private static boolean endsWith1to9(String a) {
        for(int i = 1; i <= 9; i++) {
            if(a.endsWith(String.valueOf(i))) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
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Other than regexs:

private static String getProfileName(String path) {
    final int len = path.length();
    for (int i=0; i<len; ++i) {
       char c = path.charAt(i);
       if ('1' <= c && c <= '9') {
           return i==0 ? "" : path.substring(0, i-1); // Probably don't want that -1 !!
       }
    }
    return len==0 ? "" : path.substring(0, len-1);
}

Or perhaps, for Single Entry, Single Exit fans:

private static String getProfileName(String path) {
    final int len = path.length();
    int i=0;
    while (i != len && !isProfileTerminator(path.charAt(i))) {
    //Or (!(i == len || isProfileTerminator(path.charAt(i)))) {
       ++i;
    }
    return i==0 ? "" : path.substring(0, i-1);
}
private static boolean isProfileTerminator(char c) {
    return '1' <= c && c <= '9');
}

There are issues in the original code with strings that are empty or start with 1-9.

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@Rup Yup, testPath was unusued. Seems to be returning the string before the digit (less one character - punctuation? - doesn't check that the input is well formed). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 11 '10 at 17:59
    
+1: For not using regex. –  Aryabhatta Aug 11 '10 at 18:01
    
Sure - I meant the not-matched case at the bottom should return the full string (or, as you point out, less one character) –  Rup Aug 11 '10 at 18:01
    
Thanks for your no-regex solution. But if I compare the two solution I have to admit that regex looks nicer. So ill accept the regex answer. –  RoflcoptrException Aug 11 '10 at 18:22
  private String getProfileName(String path)
  {
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < path.length() && !Character.isDigit(path.charAt(i)); i++);
    return path.substring(0, i);
  }
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I like this. And this coming from a guy who loves regex. I hope no one downvotes you. –  polygenelubricants Aug 11 '10 at 18:35

I think something like this will work. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

private String getProfileName(String path) {
    int i = 0;
    for(i = 0; i < path.length; ++i)
    {
        if(path.charAt(i) > '0' && path.charAt(i) <= '9') break;
    }
    return path.substring(0, i-1);
}
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Mine:

private String getProfileName(String path) {

    return path.split("[1-9]")[0];
}

Hope this will help you.

Explanation. As Mark Byers said Split on digits (first version, second version ignores 0), and return the first element of the resulting array. But I think it won't fail if first argument is a digit (tested with jdk1.6.0_20). It fails if all characters from the path are digits (by example "2223"). You can use this version to avoid the error:

private String getProfileName(String path) {

    String[] result = path.split("[1-9]");
    return result.length > 0 ? result[0] : "";
}

As you will se at String's split method javadocs, it takes an argument (a regular expression), you can use one of this:

return path.split("[1-9]")[0]; //if you want to avoid 0
return path.split("\\d")[0]; //if you don't

IMHO: Using split method is better than other approaches if you are looking for improve your code readability,

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Can you explain this? :D –  RoflcoptrException Aug 11 '10 at 18:16
1  
Split on digits, and return the first element of the resulting array. It fails if the first character is a digit (but than again so does your code). split("\\d", 2) would probably be better. –  Mark Byers Aug 11 '10 at 18:19
    
Don't readed Rup comment, just edited with my code now –  sourcerebels Aug 11 '10 at 18:22

Sure, you can refactor that using brute force...but why not use Apache Commons?

private String getProfileName(String path) {
    int index = StringUtils.indexOfAny(path, "123456789");
    if(index != -1) {
        return path.substring(0, index);
    }
    return path;
}
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+1 I was writing the same. –  svachon Aug 11 '10 at 18:34

Here's a one-liner regex solution that is quite simple:

private String getProfileName(String path) {
    return path.replaceFirst("(?s)\\d.*", "");
}

The pattern is \d.* in Pattern.DOTALL mode, as embedded flag (?s). This will match a digit, and everything after it. We want to remove this part, so we replace with the empty string.

Note that \d includes 0 as well, so replace with [1-9] if that's really the specification.

References

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My try:

/**
 * Numeric Register Optimized Search with Null Pointer Handling.
 * -> No use of Regex (per requirement). :)
 * -> No use of Character.isDigit() (NOTE: includes characters other than [0-9].)
 * -> Catch and Avoid NullPointerExceptions (Oops... review other methods above.)
 * -> Reduce for(...; test ; ...) to while(test) by variable declaration and ++off use.
 * -> Include ANDed test to avoid break call.
 * -> Cache "path.length" in local variable (e.g. CPU register)
 * -> Cache "path.charAt(off)" in local variable (e.g. CPU register)
 * -> Replace String.endsWith(...) Method with char < char Register Method.
 * -> Reuse path argument to avoid another internal object reference.
 * -> Avoid call to substring if [1-9] not found in path.
 * -> Single Entry/Single Exit Happy. :)
 * @return path null if passed null, otherwise valid value.
 */
private String getProfileName(String path) {
    if (path != null) {
        int off = -1, len = path.length;
        final char one = '1', nine = '9';
        char c;
        while (++off < len && (c = path.charAt(off)) < one && c > nine);
        if (off < len) {
            path = path.substring(0, off);
        }
    }
    return (path);
}
Cheers, loeJava

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