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I feel like I should know this, but somehow I'm drawing a blank for the last 30 minutes...

How would one go plotting a plane in matlab or matplotlib from a normal vector and a point? I keep wanting to use the symbolic math solver, but I don't have the license for it currently... :\

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3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

For Matlab:

point = [1,2,3];
normal = [1,1,2];

%# a plane is a*x+b*y+c*z+d=0
%# [a,b,c] is the normal. Thus, we have to calculate
%# d and we're set
d = -point*normal'; %'# dot product for less typing

%# create x,y
[xx,yy]=ndgrid(1:10,1:10);

%# calculate corresponding z
z = (-normal(1)*xx - normal(2)*yy - d)/normal(3);

%# plot the surface
figure
surf(xx,yy,z)

enter image description here

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Oh wow, I never knew there even was a ndgrid function. Here I was jumping through hoops with repmat and indexing to create them on the fly all this time haha. Thanks! Edit: btw would it be z = -normal(1)*xx - normal(2)*yy - d; instead? –  Xzhsh Aug 11 '10 at 19:33
    
@Xzhsh: oops, yes. Fixed. –  Jonas Aug 11 '10 at 19:37
    
also divide by normal(3) ;). Just in case someone else looks at this question and gets confused –  Xzhsh Aug 11 '10 at 20:39
    
@Xyhsh: well, looks like you're not the only one whose brain isn't working :) –  Jonas Aug 11 '10 at 20:50

For all the copy/pasters out there, here is similar code for Python using matplotlib:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D

point  = np.array([1, 2, 3])
normal = np.array([1, 1, 2])

# a plane is a*x+b*y+c*z+d=0
# [a,b,c] is the normal. Thus, we have to calculate
# d and we're set
d = -point.dot(normal)

# create x,y
xx, yy = np.meshgrid(range(10), range(10))

# calculate corresponding z
z = (-normal[0] * xx - normal[1] * yy - d) * 1. /normal[2]

# plot the surface
plt3d = plt.figure().gca(projection='3d')
plt3d.plot_surface(xx, yy, z)
plt.show()

enter image description here

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1  
note that z is of type int in the original snippet which creates a wiggly surface. I would use z = (-normal[0]*xx - normal[1]*yy - d) * 1. /normal[2] to convert z into real. –  Falcon Aug 27 '13 at 19:16
1  
Thanks a lot Falcon, before your comment I actually thought it was a limitation with matplotlib. I tried to compensate by meshing with 100 elements -> range(100), while the Matlab example only used 10 -> 1:10. I edited my solution appropriately. –  Simon Streicher Aug 28 '13 at 10:35
    
If one wants to make the output more comparable to @Jonas matlab example do the following : a) replace range(10) with np.arange(1,11). b) add a plt3d.azim=-135.0 line before plt.show() (since Matlab and matplotlib seem to have different default rotations). c) Nitpicking: xlim([0,10]) and ylim([0, 10]). Finally, adding axis labels would have helped to see the main difference in the first place, so I would add xlabel('x') and ylabel('y') for clarity and correspondingly for the Matlab example. –  Joma Dec 11 '14 at 8:17

For copy-pasters wanting a gradient on the surface:

from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
from matplotlib import cm
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

point = np.array([1, 2, 3])
normal = np.array([1, 1, 2])

# a plane is a*x+b*y+c*z+d=0
# [a,b,c] is the normal. Thus, we have to calculate
# d and we're set
d = -point.dot(normal)

# create x,y
xx, yy = np.meshgrid(range(10), range(10))

# calculate corresponding z
z = (-normal[0] * xx - normal[1] * yy - d) * 1. / normal[2]

# plot the surface
plt3d = plt.figure().gca(projection='3d')

Gx, Gy = np.gradient(xx * yy)  # gradients with respect to x and y
G = (Gx ** 2 + Gy ** 2) ** .5  # gradient magnitude
N = G / G.max()  # normalize 0..1

plt3d.plot_surface(xx, yy, z, rstride=1, cstride=1,
                   facecolors=cm.jet(N),
                   linewidth=0, antialiased=False, shade=False
)
plt.show()

enter image description here

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