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I have two lists in Python, like these:

temp1 = ['One', 'Two', 'Three', 'Four']
temp2 = ['One', 'Two']

I need to create a third list with items from the first list which aren't present in the second one. From the example I have to get:

temp3 = ['Three', 'Four']

Are there any fast ways without cycles and checking?

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2  
Are the elements guaranteed unique? If you have temp1 = ['One', 'One', 'One'] and temp2 = ['One'], do you want ['One', 'One'] back, or []? –  Michael Mrozek Aug 11 '10 at 19:43
    
@michael-mrozek they are unique. –  Ockonal Aug 11 '10 at 19:45
3  
Do you want to preserve the order of the elements? –  Mark Byers Aug 11 '10 at 19:49

13 Answers 13

up vote 202 down vote accepted
In [5]: list(set(temp1) - set(temp2))
Out[5]: ['Four', 'Three']
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9  
Doesn't preserve order and eliminates duplicate items, but still the best solution, at least performance-wise. +1 –  delnan Aug 11 '10 at 19:42
41  
Beware that set([1, 2]) - set([2, 3]) == set([1]) where you might expect/want it to equal set([1, 3]). If you do want set([1, 3]) for your answer, you'll need to use set([1, 2]).symmetric_difference(set([2, 3]). –  Josh Jun 19 '13 at 17:50
1  
@Josh: The OP does require only those items present in the first list. However, thanks for the comment -- useful for anyone looking for a symmetric difference. –  ars Jun 20 '13 at 23:27
    
i didn't know you could subtract lists like this –  Drewdin Oct 8 '14 at 0:50
3  
@Drewdin: Lists do not support the "-" operand. Sets, however, do, and that what is demonstrated above if you look closely. –  Godsmith Oct 14 '14 at 21:21

The existing solutions all offer either one or the other of:

  • Faster than O(n*m) performance.
  • Preserve order of input list.

But so far no solution has both. If you want both, try this:

s = set(temp2)
temp3 = [x for x in temp1 if x not in s]

Performance test

import timeit
init = 'temp1 = list(range(100)); temp2 = [i * 2 for i in range(50)]'
print timeit.timeit('list(set(temp1) - set(temp2))', init, number = 100000)
print timeit.timeit('s = set(temp2);[x for x in temp1 if x not in s]', init, number = 100000)
print timeit.timeit('[item for item in temp1 if item not in temp2]', init, number = 100000)

Results:

4.34620224079 # ars' answer
4.2770634955  # This answer
30.7715615392 # matt b's answer

The method I presented as well as preserving order is also (slightly) faster than the set subtraction because it doesn't require construction of an unnecessary set. The performance difference would be more noticable if the first list is considerably longer than the second and if hashing is expensive. Here's a second test demonstrating this:

init = '''
temp1 = [str(i) for i in range(100000)]
temp2 = [str(i * 2) for i in range(50)]
'''

Results:

11.3836875916 # ars' answer
3.63890368748 # this answer (3 times faster!)
37.7445402279 # matt b's answer
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8  
+1 for benchmarks (proving my assumption wrong, rightfully so) and having the fastest answer :) –  delnan Aug 11 '10 at 20:32
    
Additional support for this answer: Ran across a use case where preserving list order was important for performance. When working with tarinfo or zipinfo objects I was using set subtraction. To exclude certain tarinfo objects from being extracted from the archive. Creating the new list was fast but super slow during extraction. The reason evaded me at first. Turns out reordering the tarinfo objects list caused a huge performance penalty. Switching to the list comprehension method saved the day. –  Ray Thompson Dec 13 '11 at 0:26
    
@MarkByers - perhaps I should write an entirely new question for this. But how would this work in a forloop? For instance, if my temp1 and temp2 keep changing.. and I want to append the new information to temp3? –  Ason Aug 9 '12 at 17:57
    
@Ason: I think you should create a new question. You need to make the question more clear. –  Mark Byers Aug 9 '12 at 18:18
1  
it wouldn't work if list2 has more elemnets than list1 –  Dejel Dec 5 '13 at 14:39
temp3 = [item for item in temp1 if item not in temp2]
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3  
Turning temp2 into a set before would make this a bit more efficient. –  lunaryorn Aug 11 '10 at 19:47
    
True, depends if Ockonal cares about duplicates or not (original question doesn't say) –  matt b Aug 11 '10 at 19:47
    
Comment says the (lists|tuples) don't have duplicates. –  delnan Aug 11 '10 at 19:52

i'll toss in since none of the present solutions yield a tuple:

temp3 = tuple(set(temp1) - set(temp2))

alternatively:

#edited using @Mark Byers idea. If you accept this one as answer, just accept his instead.
temp3 = tuple(x for x in temp1 if x not in set(temp2))

Like the other non-tuple yielding answers in this direction, it preserves order

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Good catch, worth +1 –  delnan Aug 11 '10 at 19:44
    
+1: Based on the OPs mistakes in the question and accepted answer it looks likely that he really meant 'list' when he wrote 'tuple' and so have edited the question accordingly. –  Mark Byers Aug 11 '10 at 20:44

The difference between two lists (say list1 and list2) can be found using the following simple function.

def diff(list1, list2):
    c = set(list1).union(set(list2))
    d = set(list1).intersection(set(list2))
    return list(c - d)

By Using the above function, the difference can be found using diff(temp2, temp1) or diff(temp1, temp2). Both will give the result ['Four', 'Three']. You don't have to worry about the order of the list or which list is to be given first.

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1  
Why not set(list1).symmetric_difference(set(list2))? –  swietyy Mar 4 at 16:49
    
@swietyy That too works. Good one. –  arulmr Mar 5 at 4:49

In case you want the difference recursively, I have written a package for python: https://github.com/seperman/deepdiff

Installation

Install from PyPi:

pip install deepdiff

Example usage

Importing

>>> from deepdiff import DeepDiff
>>> from pprint import pprint
>>> from __future__ import print_function # In case running on Python 2

Same object returns empty

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3}
>>> t2 = t1
>>> print(DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{}

Type of an item has changed

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:"2", 3:3}
>>> print(DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{'type_changes': ["root[2]: 2=<type 'int'> ===> 2=<type 'str'>"]}

Value of an item has changed

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:4, 3:3}
>>> print(DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{'values_changed': ['root[2]: 2 ===> 4']}

Item added and/or removed

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:4}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:4, 3:3, 5:5, 6:6}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff)
{'dic_item_added': ['root[5, 6]'],
 'dic_item_removed': ['root[4]'],
 'values_changed': ['root[2]: 2 ===> 4']}

String difference

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world"}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:4, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world!"}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{ 'values_changed': [ 'root[2]: 2 ===> 4',
                      "root[4]['b']: 'world' ===> 'world!'"]}
>>>
>>> print (ddiff['values_changed'][1])
root[4]['b']: 'world' ===> 'world!'

String difference 2

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world!\nGoodbye!\n1\n2\nEnd"}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world\n1\n2\nEnd"}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{ 'values_changed': [ "root[4]['b']:\n"
                      '--- \n'
                      '+++ \n'
                      '@@ -1,5 +1,4 @@\n'
                      '-world!\n'
                      '-Goodbye!\n'
                      '+world\n'
                      ' 1\n'
                      ' 2\n'
                      ' End']}
>>>
>>> print (ddiff['values_changed'][0])
root[4]['b']:
--- 
+++ 
@@ -1,5 +1,4 @@
-world!
-Goodbye!
+world
 1
 2
 End

Type change

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, 3]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":"world\n\n\nEnd"}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{ 'type_changes': [ "root[4]['b']: [1, 2, 3]=<type 'list'> ===> world\n"
                    '\n'
                    '\n'
                    "End=<type 'str'>"]}

List difference

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, 3, 4]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2]}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{'iterable_item_removed': ["root[4]['b']: [3, 4]"]}

List difference 2:

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, 3]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 3, 2, 3]}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{ 'iterable_item_added': ["root[4]['b']: [3]"],
  'values_changed': ["root[4]['b'][1]: 2 ===> 3", "root[4]['b'][2]: 3 ===> 2"]}

List that contains dictionary:

>>> t1 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, {1:1, 2:2}]}}
>>> t2 = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3, 4:{"a":"hello", "b":[1, 2, {1:3}]}}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> pprint (ddiff, indent = 2)
{ 'dic_item_removed': ["root[4]['b'][2][2]"],
  'values_changed': ["root[4]['b'][2][1]: 1 ===> 3"]}

Sets:

>>> t1 = {1, 2, 8}
>>> t2 = {1, 2, 3, 5}
>>> ddiff = DeepDiff(t1, t2)
>>> print (DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{'set_item_added': ['root: [3, 5]'], 'set_item_removed': ['root: [8]']}

Named Tuples:

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> Point = namedtuple('Point', ['x', 'y'])
>>> t1 = Point(x=11, y=22)
>>> t2 = Point(x=11, y=23)
>>> print (DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{'values_changed': ['root.y: 22 ===> 23']}

Custom objects:

>>> class ClassA(object):
...     a = 1
...     def __init__(self, b):
...         self.b = b
...
>>> t1 = ClassA(1)
>>> t2 = ClassA(2)
>>>
>>> print(DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{'values_changed': ['root.b: 1 ===> 2']}

Object attribute added:

>>> t2.c = "new attribute"
>>> print(DeepDiff(t1, t2))
{'attribute_added': ['root.c'], 'values_changed': ['root.b: 1 ===> 2']}
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Try this:

temp3 = set(temp1) - set(temp2)
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What is the complexity of the algorithm? –  Dejel Dec 5 '13 at 14:40

this could be even faster than Mark's list comprehension:

filterfalse(set(temp2).__contains__, temp1)
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3  
Might want to include the from itertools import filterfalse bit here. Also note that this doesn't return a sequence like the others, it returns an iterator. –  Matt Luongo Jan 17 '12 at 16:16

This is another solution:

def diff(a, b):
    xa = [i for i in set(a) if i not in b]
    xb = [i for i in set(b) if i not in a]
    return xa + xb
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You could use a naive method if the elements of the difflist are sorted and sets.

list1=[1,2,3,4,5]
list2=[1,2,3]

print list1[len(list2):]

or with native set methods:

subset=set(list1).difference(list2)

print subset

import timeit
init = 'temp1 = list(range(100)); temp2 = [i * 2 for i in range(50)]'
print "Naive solution: ", timeit.timeit('temp1[len(temp2):]', init, number = 100000)
print "Native set solution: ", timeit.timeit('set(temp1).difference(temp2)', init, number = 100000)

Naive solution: 0.0787101593292

Native set solution: 0.998837615564

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If you run into TypeError: unhashable type: 'list' you need to turn lists or sets into tuples, e.g.

set(map(tuple, list_of_lists1)).symmetric_difference(set(map(tuple, list_of_lists2)))

See also How to compare a list of lists/sets in python?

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If you are really looking into performance, then use numpy!

l1=range(1,100000,3)
l2=range(0,100000,7)

%%time
list_comp1=[_ for _ in l2 if _ not in l1]

Wall time: 6.3 s

%%time
numpy_diff=np.setdiff1d(np.array(l1),np.array(l2))

Wall time: 6 ms

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single line version of arulmr solution

def diff(listA, listB):
    return set(listA) - set(listB) | set(listA) -set(listB)
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