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I would like develop program with a lot of image processing. I would like to use Java, and JAI, but it seems to me, that Jai is old and no longer evolve? (http://java.sun.com/javase/technologies/desktop/media/jai/)


I wonder, is it better choice to use QT and c++?
Two main pros which I am looking for is: cross platform code and good learning opportunity.

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WillYouUpvoteGoodAnswers too? – Stephen Aug 11 '10 at 22:05
    
yep as you can see! – IwillAcceptBestAnswer Aug 12 '10 at 8:44
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you're wanting to do image processing, then what JAI did 3 years ago will be sufficient for the mathematical base of what you want to do now. New image formats etc would probably not require new updates to JAI.

I just can't think of anything that you'd need to add once you've got the basic operations - it's the application on top that's going to get new features.

Now how you get your graphical ideas into an Image that you can then process... awt, swing, Java FX...

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... if so, why in any browser I cant run that example (hello world) java.sun.com/developer/onlineTraining/javaai/jai/index.html ?;) – IwillAcceptBestAnswer Aug 11 '10 at 22:57
    
If you go to your system tray with the java icon, right-click and show java console, then you'll see that you're getting a ClassNotFoundException on javax.media.jai.PlanarImage. It would seem that you need to drop the jai.jar into your jre/lib/ext folder for it to work – Stephen Aug 12 '10 at 3:44
    
Yep! Worked for me - just install JAI on your computer and away you go. – Stephen Aug 12 '10 at 3:55
    
Thx, +1, so is there any way to compile WITH that classs? It probably called "static compiling"? If user have to install it by itself, he probably give up. – IProblemFactory Aug 12 '10 at 8:24
    
You just bundle the jai jars as you would any other in your application. The installer merely upgrades a client JRE in so that you only installed it once. This is better for applets, and was probably done pre-webstart as well. Speaking of web-start, you could also try jai-webstart.dev.java.net/examples.html, but I couldn't get those to download nicely on my connection... – Stephen Aug 13 '10 at 12:32

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