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I'm trying to create a switch statement but I can't seem to be able to use an expression that gets evaluated (rather than a set string/integer). I can easily do this with if statements but case should hopefully be faster.

I'm trying the following

function reward(amount) {
    var $reward = $("#reward");
    switch (amount) {
        case (amount >= 7500 && amount < 10000):
            $reward.text("Play Station 3");
            break;
        case (amount >= 10000 && amount < 15000):
            $reward.text("XBOX 360");
            break;
        case (amount >= 15000):
            $reward.text("iMac");
            break;
        default:
            $reward.text("No reward");
            break;
    }
}

Am i missing something obvious or is this not possible? Google hasn't been friendly in this case.

Any help/pointers appreciated

M

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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That is not how a switch block works. The case is used to hold a single value that if they are equal to the value on the switch line. if-else statements will serve you well.

Here is some information about the switch block.

http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_switch.asp

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You could always do

switch (true) {
  case (amount >= 7500 && amount < 10000):
    //code
    break;
  case (amount >= 10000 && amount < 15000):
    //code
    break;

  //etc...

It works because true is a constant, so the code under the first case statement with an expression that evaluates to true will be executed.

It's kinda "tricky" I guess, but I see nothing wrong with using it. A simple if/else statement would probably be more concise, and you'd not have to worry about accidental fall-through. But there it is anyway.

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1  
This is better as an answer than Daniels "answer". With a slight warning: all the expressions before the one leading to case true, will be evaluated too. be careful. –  user182669 Aug 19 '13 at 11:17

Firstly, that's not how switch works. You have to specify constants for each case, and those constants will be compared to the expression in parentheses (in your case, amount). That is how switch works, period.

Secondly, switch is not faster than several ifs

And thirdly, you shouldn't really worry about miniscule performance optimizations when you're dealing with javascript.

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@MooGoo's switch (true) will give you a Weird condition error in jsLint, so let's get a little more creative in case that's an issue, and, I think, increase readability a touch.

So we're not evaluating if each case is true or false; we're comparing if that case's value is equal to our switch term. So let's take advantage of that by throwing a shorthand if into our case statement and return our original switch term if the condition's true.

I'm also including a sort of real world example, where you want to have two "defaults" -- one if your term is outside of your "important" range in the positive direction, and another in case you're in the negative direction.

Key phrase: case (x > 0 ? x : null):

"If my term, x, is greater than zero, return x so that x === x and I take the case branch."

http://jsfiddle.net/rufwork/upGH6/1/

/*global document*/
/*jslint evil:true*/
var x = 10;

switch (x) {
    case (x > 0 ? x : null):
        document.write('ha ha ha!  I fooled switch AND jsLint!  Muhahahahaha!');
        break;
    case 0:
        document.write('zero is nothing.');
        break;
    case -1:
        document.write('low');
        break;
    case -2:
        document.write('lower');
        break;
    case -3: 
        document.write('lowest I care about');
        break;
    default: // anything lower than -3.
        document.write('TOO LOW!!!! (unless you cheated and didn\'t use an int)');
}
document.write('<br>done.');
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The problem is the switch expression cannot ever equal the case expressions, because the case expression will evaluate to true or false, but the switch expression will be a number.

The solution where the switch expression is set to true works not because true is a constant but because equality with the case expressions is actually possible.

It's not true that you have to specify constants for each case expression.

To back up my answer, refer to Douglas Crockford, Javascript The Good Parts (2008), page 12:

The switch statement performs a multiway branch. It compares the expression for equality with all the selected cases.... When an exact match is found, the statements of the matching case clause are executed... A case clause contains one or more case expressions. The case expressions need not be constants.

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You could also try one of my favorite constructions:

function reward(amount) {
    var $reward = $("#reward");
    $reward.text(
        (amount >= 7500 && amount < 10000) ?    "Play Station 3" :
        (amount >= 10000 && amount < 15000)?    "XBOX 360" :
        (amount >= 15000) ?                     "iMac" :
                                                "No reward"
    );
}
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Would you still have to check that the amount is under a number if you evaluated them in reverse? –  Spencer Killen Jun 26 at 1:19
    
I guess of course that would stop people with bigger rewards from getter them faster;) –  Spencer Killen Jun 26 at 1:21
    
Nested ternary operators are often feared and discouraged completely. So it's best to avoid using them unless they're simpler, plainly obvious, and more easily maintained than alternative constructions. I prefer tests that work in any order. However you choose to write them, simplicity and maintainability trump efficiency here. –  robert Jul 6 at 12:28

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