Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a datetime object produced using strptime().

>>> tm
datetime.datetime(2010, 6, 10, 3, 56, 23)

What I need to do is round the minute to the closest 10th minute. What I have been doing up to this point was taking the minute value and using round() on it.

min = round(tm.minute, -1)

However, as with the above example, it gives an invalid time when the minute value is greater than 56. i.e.: 3:60

What is a better way to do this? Does datetime support this?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

This will get the 'floor' of a datetime object stored in tm rounded to the 10 minute mark before tm.

tm = tm - datetime.timedelta(minutes=tm.minute % 10,
                             seconds=tm.second,
                             microseconds=tm.microsecond)

If you want classic rounding to the nearest 10 minute mark, do this:

discard = datetime.timedelta(minutes=tm.minute % 10,
                             seconds=tm.second,
                             microseconds=tm.microsecond)
tm -= discard
if discard >= datetime.timedelta(minutes=5):
    tm += datetime.timedelta(minutes=10)

or this:

tm += datetime.timedelta(minutes=5)
tm -= datetime.timedelta(minutes=tm.minute % 10,
                         seconds=tm.second,
                         microseconds=tm.microsecond)
share|improve this answer

General function to round a datetime at any time laps in seconds:

def roundTime(dt=None, roundTo=60):
   """Round a datetime object to any time laps in seconds
   dt : datetime.datetime object, default now.
   roundTo : Closest number of seconds to round to, default 1 minute.
   Author: Thierry Husson 2012 - Use it as you want but don't blame me.
   """
   if dt == None : dt = datetime.datetime.now()
   seconds = (dt - dt.min).seconds
   # // is a floor division, not a comment on following line:
   rounding = (seconds+roundTo/2) // roundTo * roundTo
   return dt + datetime.timedelta(0,rounding-seconds,-dt.microsecond)

Samples with 1 hour rounding & 30 minutes rounding:

print roundTime(datetime.datetime(2012,12,31,23,44,59,1234),roundTo=60*60)
2013-01-01 00:00:00

print roundTime(datetime.datetime(2012,12,31,23,44,59,1234),roundTo=30*60)
2012-12-31 23:30:00
share|improve this answer

if you don't want to use condition, you can use modulo operator:

minutes = int(round(tm.minute, -1)) % 60

UPDATE

did you want something like this?

def timeround10(dt):
    a, b = divmod(round(dt.minute, -1), 60)
    return '%i:%02i' % ((dt.hour + a) % 24, b)

timeround10(datetime.datetime(2010, 1, 1, 0, 56, 0)) # 0:56
# -> 1:00

timeround10(datetime.datetime(2010, 1, 1, 23, 56, 0)) # 23:56
# -> 0:00

.. if you want result as string. for obtaining datetime result, it's better to use timedelta - see other responses ;)

share|improve this answer
    
O hmmm that might do the trick. –  Lucas Manco Aug 12 '10 at 1:01
    
Ah but then the problem here is that the hour must increase as well –  Lucas Manco Aug 12 '10 at 1:10
    
Yea along those lines. –  Lucas Manco Aug 12 '10 at 1:17
1  
@Lucas Manco - My solution also works fine and I think makes more sense. –  Omnifarious Aug 12 '10 at 6:03

I also found this when searching for a similar solution: round_off

share|improve this answer
1  
dead url....... –  pfctdayelise Apr 26 '13 at 6:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.