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So I have an input file that uses my company's namespace in the default namespace (xmlns="companyURL") but I want my output file to use something other than the default namespace (xmlns:cmp="companyURL"). So I construct my file using the cmp namespace, but then I want to copy some of the inner elements:

<xsl:element name="cmp:container">
  <xsl:for-each select="foo">
    <xsl:copy-of select="." />
  </xsl:for-each>
</xsl:element>

Unfortunately, what this does is define the default namespace for each of those inner elements, making the file incredibly verbose and ugly. Simplified example:

Source:

<foo xmlns="companyURL">
  <num1>asdf</num1>
  <num2>ghjkl</num2>
</foo>

Turns into:

<cmp:container xmlns:cmp="companyURL">
  <num1 xmlns="companyURL">asdf</num1>
  <num2 xmlns="companyURL">ghjkl</num2>
</cmp:container>

Of course, companyURL is big and long and ugly, and it's the same in both places, so I would prefer the above result to just be the following:

<cmp:container xmlns:cmp="companyURL">
  <cmp:num1>asdf</cmp:num1>
  <cmp:num2>ghjkl</cmp:num2>
</cmp:container>

Is there an easy way to do this, or should I convert everything under the cmp namespace to the default namespace? I would prefer to use the explicit namespace naming if possible, it aids in understanding the XSLT in my experience.

share|improve this question
    
Good question (+1). See my answer for a short and simple solution, :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 12 '10 at 1:31
    
"want my output file to use something other than the default namespace" >> following your example, changing the prefix (or from default to a prefix) does not mean changing the namespace. The elements, from an XML+NS point of view, will remain equal (localname + namespace is unaltered), even though the prefix is different. –  Abel Aug 12 '10 at 12:11
    
I was referring to the visible identifier in front of the tag name. –  adam_0 Aug 12 '10 at 16:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This transformation:

 <xsl:template match="*">
     <xsl:element name="cmp:{name()}" namespace="CompanyURL">
       <xsl:copy-of select="@*"/>
       <xsl:apply-templates/>
     </xsl:element>
 </xsl:template>
 <xsl:template match="/*">
     <cmp:container xmlns:cmp="CompanyURL">
       <xsl:copy-of select="@*"/>
       <xsl:apply-templates/>
     </cmp:container>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when performed on the provided XML document:

<foo xmlns="companyURL">
  <num1>asdf</num1>
  <num2>ghjkl</num2>
</foo>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<cmp:container xmlns:cmp="CompanyURL">
   <cmp:num1>asdf</cmp:num1>
   <cmp:num2>ghjkl</cmp:num2>
</cmp:container>
share|improve this answer
1  
Why do you have <xsl:copy-of select="@*"/> in your XSLT? –  adam_0 Aug 12 '10 at 16:26
2  
@adam_0: This copies all attributes of the element. In your concrete example there are no attributes, but if we want to use this code as a general convertor, it must be able to convert correctly all documents -- including such in which there are elements with attributes. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 12 '10 at 17:42
2  
If you are 100% sure you can remove it, but leaving it doesn't hurt anything -- simply no attributes will be copied. It is always better to have more generic code. Imagine that tomorrow there is a change in the schema and there would be attributes. Then you'd need to add copying of attributes. In case you used the more generic code from the very start, this change in schema will not affect you at all. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 12 '10 at 18:22
1  
A follow-up I just thought about: could I make this work for any namespace prefix by changing the top template line of <xsl:element name="cmp:{name()}" namespace="CompanyURL"> to <xsl:element name="cmp:{local-name()}" namespace="CompanyURL"> (effectively trimming off any namespace prefix and putting on my own)? –  adam_0 Aug 12 '10 at 18:48
2  
@adam_0: Yes, this is the way to do prefix-renaming. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 12 '10 at 19:15

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