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What can I use in place of a "long" that could be cloneable?

Refer below to the code for which I'm getting an error here as long is not cloneable.

public static CloneableDictionary<string, long> returnValues = new CloneableDictionary<string, long>();

EDIT: I forgot to mention I was wanting to use the following code that I found (see below).

public class CloneableDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue> where TValue : ICloneable
{
    public IDictionary<TKey, TValue> Clone()
    {
        var clone = new CloneableDictionary<TKey, TValue>();

        foreach (KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> pair in this)
        {
            clone.Add(pair.Key, (TValue)pair.Value.Clone());
        }
        return clone;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why? What are you trying to do? What's CloneableDictionary? – SLaks Aug 12 '10 at 1:37
    
Where does the CloneableDictionary class come from? – John K Aug 12 '10 at 1:37
    
sorry - have updated the question – Greg Aug 12 '10 at 1:38
    
Why? What are you trying to do? – SLaks Aug 12 '10 at 1:40
up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is no point in cloning a long.

You should use a regular Dictionary<string, long>.

If you want to clone the dictionary itself, you can write new Dictionary<string, long>(otherDictionary).

share|improve this answer
    
sorry - have updated the question – Greg Aug 12 '10 at 1:39
    
@Slaks your comment re "f you want to clone the dictionary itself, you can write new Dictionary<string, long>(otherDictionary)" has set me straight - thanks – Greg Aug 12 '10 at 1:43
    
that would give you a shallow clone. I.e. clone of the collection, but not elements in it. – Ilia G Aug 12 '10 at 1:50
2  
@liho1eye - both String and Int64 are immutable so there's no point in cloning. Furthermore since Int64 is a value type, any time it gets assigned to a new variable, it is "cloned" anyway. – Josh Aug 12 '10 at 2:04
    
@Josh - Oh. So in my case I'm using the Dictionary as a static variable in a backgroundWorker thread collecting data. I want to send back "snapshots" of the results periodically via "BackgroundWorker.ReportProgress". So would I be ok passing back the reference to my it? – Greg Aug 12 '10 at 2:16
public class CloneableDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    public IDictionary<TKey, TValue> Clone()
    {
        var clone = new CloneableDictionary<TKey, TValue>();

        foreach (KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> pair in this)
        {
            ICloneable clonableValue = pair.Value as ICloneable;
            if (clonableValue != null)
                clone.Add(pair.Key, (TValue)clonableValue.Clone());
            else
                clone.Add(pair.Key, pair.Value);
        }

        return clone;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why not MemberwiseClone? (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) – Steven Sudit Aug 12 '10 at 2:20
    
This is not necessary at all for Dictionary<String,Int64> which is what the OP would be using it for since String and Int64 are immutable. Furthermore, such a design incorrectly implies that it supports all types of TValue but if you passed it a TValue that does not implement ICloneable, then it would fail to do what it claims. TValue should be constrained to be ICloneable but as I said, this doesn't help the OP any. – Josh Aug 12 '10 at 2:40
    
@Steven Sudit because it does shallow copy? Now it is entirely possible that OP simply misunderstood his task and shallow copy IS what he needs, but I work with what I am given. @Josh Einstein Yes, the CloneableDictionary does not change the fact that primitive types don't need to be cloned in the first place. I disagree with your definition of "fails" though. It attempts to do what is required, then falls back to the default behavior. That makes perfect sense to me. Yes, having CloneableDictionary<string,long> is completely pointless, but thats isn't the only possible use for it. – Ilia G Aug 12 '10 at 3:41
    
oh and thanks for all the minuses, I should keep that in mind when I am trying to keep my answer on top. – Ilia G Aug 12 '10 at 3:47
    
Yes, I do believe a shallow copy is sufficient, as all of the values are immutable. And please don't thank me for the downvote, as I cannot take credit for it. I do not downvote without explanation. – Steven Sudit Aug 12 '10 at 12:35

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