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I've just typed in an example from K&R...

#include <stdio.h>

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {

    int c, nl;

    nl = 0;

    while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {

        if (c == '\n') {
            ++nl;   
        }



    }

    printf("new lines=> %d\n", nl);

    return 0;
}

However, when I build & run, I get...

minimac:~ alex$ /Users/alex/Documents/K\&R/build/Debug/K\&R ; exit;

As you may be able to gather, running off the Mac OS X Terminal, if that means anything.

Why doesn't this ever prompt for input?

Update

Here is how I started my project, on Mac OS X Snow Leopard

  • Ran Xcode
  • Started new project "command line tool" and called it K&R
  • Typed in the code into main.c
  • Hit the big button above "build & run"
  • Double clicked K&R and Terminal was launched with the output above

I might also state that I have been using interpreted languages pretty much my entire life, so I am new to this compiling process.

When I use gcc to compile from the Terminal, I can run the program with ./a.out. However, once I type, I don't know how to tell the program I'm done, now please tell me how many lines have I typed in.

Here is a screenshot of my Terminal...

Terminal

share|improve this question
    
works like a charm here on snow leopard; just compiling&running with gcc test.c; ./a.out at least. –  mvds Aug 12 '10 at 3:07
    
@mvds Damn, it must be an Xcode thing, somehow. –  alex Aug 12 '10 at 3:09
    
So what exactly are you doing? What command line are you using to compile? What command line are you using to run? What's the actual output of both the compiler and your program when it's run? –  ggg Aug 12 '10 at 3:09
1  
It might be worthwhile to actually use the gcc command line, so that you become familiar with how it works. Especially if you're compiling command line example programs from K&R. Once you're comfortable with that, then you can graduate to using Xcode and you will understand what's happening underneath. –  ggg Aug 12 '10 at 3:23
2  
@alex en.wikipedia.org/wiki/End-of-transmission_character, Ctrl-D. –  Jaanus Aug 12 '10 at 4:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

OK, I just did what you said in your steps, and I am able to type into the terminal. However, before I get to see the output from the program, the terminal is closed (because of the exit;). I added a #include <unistd.h> at the beginning and sleep(2); right before return 0;, and I can see the correct output.

Here is the complete program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {

    int c, nl;

    nl = 0;

    while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {

        if (c == '\n') {
            ++nl;   
        }



    }

    printf("new lines=> %d\n", nl);
    sleep(2);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't seem to make a difference on mine. Also, apologies if this is a stupid question, but after the exit on the CL, I can type whatever I want into Terminal with new lines. Is this standard? Thanks –  alex Aug 12 '10 at 3:30
    
@alex: it's not a stupid question. The program is waiting to read stuff on standard input, and once it is done reading, it prints out the numbers of lines. So, you enter a bunch of lines, and then type ctrl-D to send EOF to it. Then, the program reports the number of lines on standard output, and exits. Xcode is running two programs in the terminal: your program, followed by exit, which exits the terminal (the shell actually). So as soon as your program prints the output, it's done, and exit exits the terminal. I think you're confused about how things are working. ... –  Alok Singhal Aug 12 '10 at 4:31
    
@alex: I suggest you compile my program in Xcode, run it, and then type a bunch of lines in the open terminal, followed by ctrl-D. You will then see the output, and then the terminal will wait for about 2 seconds and then go away. Or, you can open a terminal manually, go to the directory containing the program, run the program, and then do what I suggested above. –  Alok Singhal Aug 12 '10 at 4:33

Looks like you are doing this in Xcode. Not sure how Xcode handles stdin/out and what project template you are using. You should have all this in a simple .c file and just gcc it yourself without Xcode and see what happens then.

Edit: in Unix console, you press Ctrl-D to end stdin input to a command line program. Wikipedia has more.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for your answer. I'm using the template command line tool, and have used this in the past fine with input from the command line. –  alex Aug 12 '10 at 3:06

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