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I have a class which is routing many messages into inner component instance. So the class have only method definition, but no implementation. How can I suppress these warnings for those dynamic methods?

Update

My code sample:

@interface SomeClass : NSObject
{
}
- (void)mssageA:(id)value1 additionalOption:(id)value2;
- (void)mssageB:(id)value1 additionalOption:(id)value2;
- (void)mssageC:(id)value1 additionalOption:(id)value2;
@end
@implementation SomeClass
- (id)forwardingTargetForSelector:(SEL)aSelector
{
    if(aSelector==@selector(mssageA:additionalOption:))     return  innerComponentInstance;
    if(aSelector==@selector(mssageB:additionalOption:))     return  innerComponentInstance;
    if(aSelector==@selector(mssageC:additionalOption:))     return  innerComponentInstance;

    return  [super forwardingTargetForSelector:aSelector];
}
@end
share|improve this question
    
You might want to consider using a protocol instead of a class here. But still, a good question (because I think this is how internal implementations of for example NSNumber work...) – jtbandes Aug 12 '10 at 4:52
    
If you don't want to create a formal protocol, just use a category to define the methods. When you do that, the compiler doesn't complain about whether or not they're implemented (called an informal protocol). – Jason Coco Aug 12 '10 at 4:57
    
Thanks for reply but I can't figure out how to use protocol in this case. Maybe my question unclear. I modified my question. Or can I get a sample to applying protocol for this? – Eonil Aug 12 '10 at 5:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think a protocol implementation could look like this

@protocol SomeProtocol 

@optional
- (void)mssageA:(id)value1 additionalOption:(id)value2;
- (void)mssageB:(id)value1 additionalOption:(id)value2;
- (void)mssageC:(id)value1 additionalOption:(id)value2;
@end

@interface SomeClass : NSObject <SomeProtocol>
{
}

@implementation SomeClass
- (id)forwardingTargetForSelector:(SEL)aSelector
{
    if(aSelector==@selector(mssageA:additionalOption:))     return  innerComponentInstance;
    if(aSelector==@selector(mssageB:additionalOption:))     return  innerComponentInstance;
    if(aSelector==@selector(mssageC:additionalOption:))     return  innerComponentInstance;

    return  [super forwardingTargetForSelector:aSelector];
}
@end
share|improve this answer
    
You need an @end at the end of the protocol, I think, but otherwise looks good. – Seamus Campbell Aug 12 '10 at 5:43
    
@optional looks contain a meaning of the implementations should be checked before using it with respondsToSelector:. Do I have wrong understanding about @optional keyword? – Eonil Aug 12 '10 at 5:55
    
oh of course i just forgot the @end, lazy me. It'll be better to check respondsToSelector. You can do it - so i think - without but risk a crash – Erle Aug 12 '10 at 6:37

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