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I want to create an immutable data structure which, say, can be initialized from a file.

class Image {
public:
   const int width,height;
   Image(const char *filename) {
     MetaData md((readDataFromFile(filename)));
     width = md.width();   // Error! width  is const
     height = md.height(); // Error! height is const
   }
};

What I could do to fix the problem is

class Image {
   MetaData md;
public:
   const int width,height;
   Image(const char *filename):
     md(readDataFromFile(filename)),
     width(md.width()),height(md.height()) {}
};

However

  1. It forces me to save MetaData as a field in my object. Which I don't always want.
  2. Sometimes the logic in the constructor is much more complex than a single read (say, error handling can take a few lines)

So the only solution I thought of is along the lines of

class A {
  int stub;
  int init(){/* constructor logic goes here */}
  A():stub(init)/*now initialize all the const fields you wish
  after the constructor ran */{}
};

Is there a better idea? (In Java, you're allowed initializing finals in the constructor).

share|improve this question
1  
Why do you need the members of Image to be const? An immutable data structure would be better expressed by a const instance of a data structure class rather than an instance of a data structure class all of whose members happen to be const. If you follow this approach then you don't have any issues in your constructor; the const-ness of your object only begins once the constructor completes. –  Charles Bailey Aug 12 '10 at 7:10
    
Pretty much this- don't make member variables const, really. –  Puppy Aug 12 '10 at 9:04
    
@Charles, I want all Images to be as const as possible. I don't want the size of the object to be changed by any programmer after me in a method inside Image. I don't want to track who changed this image size, if the image size is different in two spots I can conclude it's 100% memory leak and not a lazy programmer making shortcuts. There are many valid reason to prefer force and communicate a certain field must not be changed. –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 10:34
    
Maybe change constructor to accept width and height as arguments can solve the problem. –  czchen Aug 12 '10 at 11:44
    
@Elazar Leibovich: I don't really understand what you are protecting against. If people are going to be editing your class (adding methods) without communicating with you then the first thing they are going to do is remove the const as soon as it hinders them. To me, it feels like you are trying to design in restrictions which are more suited to how you are using your class that how it could be used. –  Charles Bailey Aug 12 '10 at 17:13

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could cast away the constness in the constructor:


class Image {
public:
    const int width,height;
    Image(const char *filename) : width(0), height(0) {
        MetaData md(readDataFromFile(filename));

    int* widthModifier = const_cast<int*>(&width);
    int* heightModifier = const_cast<int*>(&height);
    cout << "Initial width " << width << "\n";
    cout << "Initial height " << height << "\n";
    *widthModifier = md.GetWidth();
    *heightModifier = md.GetHeight();
    cout << "After const to the cleaners " << width << "\n";
    cout << "After const to the cleaners " << height << "\n";
}

};

That would achieve what you want to do but I must say I personally would stay away from that and would fear any public data members(at least in regarding your particular example). I would go with Georg's approach or make the data private and provide only the getter.

share|improve this answer
    
thought about it, but I don't really like this approach. But that's probably the best approach so far. I just need to document it properly (ImitateJavasFinalChangableInConstructor...). –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 11:30
    
@Elazar: Stop trying to program Java in C++. Program C++ in C++, forget you know Java. –  GManNickG Aug 12 '10 at 11:47
1  
@GMan, I don't care if it's Java or not. Having width and height as const is a great idea, Java, Scala, Haskell, C or C++. In Java it's easier to do, in C++ you have to go through hoops. I really don't think the paradigm of const fields is Java specific or depends on Java's special traits. –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 14:44
    
@GMan, and BTW my question was to find out what's the idiomatic C++ way to have a const fields in your class which depends on computation. And the answer is probably - there's no such way. –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 14:45
1  
@Elazar: Yes, there is - a) use functions to initialize them or b) wrap them in a custom class, do the computation in its ctor and have a const member of that class. –  Georg Fritzsche Aug 12 '10 at 21:33

You could move width and height into one type and move the initialization code into an initialization helper function:

// header:
struct Size { 
    int width, height;
    Size(int w, int h) : width(w), height(h) {}
};

class Image {
    const Size size; // public data members are usually discouraged
public:
    Image(const char *filename);
};

// implementation:
namespace {
    Size init_helper(const char* filename) {
        MetaData md((readDataFromFile(filename)));
        return Size(md.width(), md.height());
    }
}

Image::Image(const char* filename) : size(init_helper(filename)) {}
share|improve this answer
2  
I'm all for downvotes if there is something wrong with an answer - but then i'd like to know what so i can fix or delete. –  Georg Fritzsche Aug 12 '10 at 8:02
    
Even more strange because our solutions are the same concept, and I have no -1. +0.5 for sympathy, +0.5 for beating me to the solution. –  GManNickG Aug 12 '10 at 8:37
    
this is a simplistic solution I already purposed. (I didn't downvote you, but maybe the downvotes are because I proposed a very similar solution, and that your solution doesn't bite the main problem). What if I have 10 such fields? What if I have some complex error handing code to initialize each of those variables? This doesn't always work. –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 10:32
    
@Elazar: Maybe i missed something, but i don't see that same approach in your question? You could also always add more fields to a helper struct which could be a nested class if necessary. I also don't see why the error handling in the initialization helper couldn't be more complex? –  Georg Fritzsche Aug 12 '10 at 21:29
    
@GeorgFritzsche nice solution but image can privately inherit size and this way one can access directly height/width from the base class that initialized them –  Ghita May 3 '12 at 22:20

You can simply use the NamedConstructor idiom here:

class Image
{
public:
  static Image FromFile(char const* fileName)
  {
    MetaData md(filename);
    return Image(md.height(), md.width());
  }

private:
  Image(int h, int w): mHeight(h), mWidth(w) {}

  int const mHeight, mWidth;
};

One of the main advantage of Named Constructors is their obviousness: the name indicates you are building your object from a file. Of course it's slightly more verbose:

Image i = Image::FromFile("foo.png");

But that never troubled me.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Matthie, that's solves is to some extent. However you used implicitly the copy constructor of Image, which is not so great. (I guess you just gotta love C++...) –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 11:21
    
@Elazar: Why is it not so great? –  GManNickG Aug 12 '10 at 11:45
    
Actually, even though it's necessary for the copy to be possible, it's unlikely the copy constructor will be executed here: Return Value Optimization takes care of performance. Note that in C++0x, we would use move semantics here, though it's also unnecessary to invoke the move constructor. –  Matthieu M. Aug 12 '10 at 13:57
    
@GMan, well, if I want to keep the image DATA on the stack as a field in image? It sometimes makes sense in real time embedded systems. Maybe I'm using resources which is not OK to have two identical classes pointing to them, in which case I want the copy constructor of this class private. –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 14:40
    
@Elazar: in C++0x you would properly define the move constructor and make the copy constructor private and it would work. Without move semantics it's messy (unfortunately). I still don't get your example though, obviously the DATA would be a private field of image. –  Matthieu M. Aug 12 '10 at 15:01

If it was C++0x, I would recommend this (delegating constructors):

class Image
{
  public:

    const int width, height;

    Image(const char* filename) : Image(readDataFromFile(filename)) { }
    Image(const MetaData& md) : width(md.width()), height(md.height()) { }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice suggestion –  Ghita May 3 '12 at 22:30

First, you should understand the constructor body is just for running code to complete initializing your object as a whole; the members must be completely initialized before the body is entered.

Ergo, all members are initialized in an (implicit unless made explicit) initialization list. Clearly, const variables must be initialized in the list because once you enter the body, they are already suppose to be initialized; you'd simply be trying to assign them.

Generally, you don't have const members. If you want those members to be immutable, just don't give any public access to them that could change them. (Also, having const members make your class non-assignable; typically unnecessarily.) Going this route easily fixes your problem, as you'd just assign them values in the body of the constructor like you wish.

A method to do what you want while maintaining const could be:

class ImageBase
{
public:
    const int width, height;

protected:
    ImageBase(const MetaData& md) :
    width(md.width()),
    height(md.height())
    {}

    // not meant to be public to users of Image
    ~ImageBase(void) {} 
};

class Image : public ImageBase
{
public:
    Image(const char* filename) : // v temporary!
    ImageBase(MetaData(readDataFromFile(filename)))
    {}
};

I don't think this route is worth it.

share|improve this answer
    
I want this fields to be immutable from within the object. I want to force the implementor never to change the Image's width or height. I can't force that with getter and setters alone. I know that that's how C++ works (ctor executes after members), but java also works that way, and have workarounds for finals. –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 11:25
    
@Elazar: Well, this isn't Java so there's no point in mentioning it. I think your best bet is to factor your immutable's out into a base class, and your Image can inherit from it. Even better, since it's a base anyway, just get rid of the const and again, provide const-accessors. Since it's the base class and you control that, you know nothing else can manipulate those values anyway. –  GManNickG Aug 12 '10 at 11:46
    
it's a good idea if you work in a small team. In a big company and a codebase that would pass many hands, I think I must assume that the next one who changes this class might not be me (or might be me which already forgot he assumed everywhere that the Image class is immutable). –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 14:48

You should add inline getters for the width and height instead of public const member variables. The compiler will make this solution as fast as the original try.

class Image {
public:
   Image(const char *filename){ // No change here
     MetaData md((readDataFromFile(filename)));
     width = md.width();
     height = md.height();
   }
   int GetWidth() const { return width; }
   int GetHeight() const { return height; }
private:
   int width,height;
};

P.S.: I used to write private things at the end because they are less important for the user of the class.

share|improve this answer
    
I want the future implementor of Image not to change width and height internally. See my comment for GMan. Your point in the P.S. is good! Thanks! –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 11:27
    
@Elazar Leibovich: Derived classes will not see width and height. Methods in not-derived classes may cause troubles. Mathieu M. rocks :-) with his static factory method. –  Notinlist Aug 12 '10 at 12:34
    
I'm not talking about client that will inherit from classes in my code. I'm talking about fellow developer which will change my code and fix bugs in my code. He's my teammate after all... I want to communicate to this guy clearly "we never touch this fields during the object's life". And I'll be glad if the compiler will prevent him from doing so. Adding const fields will force him to explain to the reviewer why is it OK to remove their constness. Making them private won't tell him he can't patch my class to change them. –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 14:38

How about passing MetaData as an argument to the constructor. This gives a lot of benefits:

a) The constructor interface makes it clear about the dependency on MetaData. b) It facilitates testing of the Image class with different types of MetaData (subclasses)

So, I would probably suggest similar to follows:

struct MD{
   int f(){return 0;}
};

struct A{
   A(MD &r) : m(r.f()){}
   int const m;
};

int main(){}
share|improve this answer
    
It makes initializing A harder, and sometimes there are many complex MD types and logic I need to initialize. –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 11:28

I'd use a static method:

class Image {
public:
    static Image* createFromFile( const std::string& filename ) {
        //read height, width...
        return new Image( width, height ); 
    } 

    //ctor etc...
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Don't use new please... –  Matthieu M. Aug 12 '10 at 8:52
1  
@Matthieu M: Don't use new ever? Don't use new in static member functions? Useful comment? I hope you don't comment your code as you have done here. –  Sam Aug 12 '10 at 9:08
    
@Sam, @Frank, who will delete the new Image you just created? How do you know that the destructor of Image doesn't delete it afterwards? This approach is very problematic. –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 12 '10 at 11:31
    
@Sam: "Don't use new [unnecessarily] please..." (It's only necessarily when the lifetime of an object needs to be independent from a scope. Of course, you want movable or shared semantics on an automatically allocated object to avoid leaks.) –  GManNickG Aug 12 '10 at 11:49
1  
Okay, long version: returning by copy will be much more efficient (RVO) and will not cause any issue of object lifetime control. The short version was destined to a Java/C# programming style, in C++ it's not necessary to use new each time you wish to create an object, and it's often harmful. Note that I didn't use the ever, I merely suggested not to use new here. As for my code ? I don't comment it ;) –  Matthieu M. Aug 12 '10 at 13:55
class A
{
public:
    int weight,height;

public:
    A():weight(0),height(0)
    {
    }

    A(const int& weight1,const int& height1):weight(weight1),height(height1)
    {
        cout<<"Inside"<<"\n";
    }
};

static A obj_1;

class Test
{
    const int height,weight;

public:
    Test(A& obj = obj_1):height(obj.height),weight(obj.weight)
    {
    }

    int getWeight()
    {
        return weight;
    }

    int getHeight()
    {
        return height;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Test obj;

    cout<<obj.getWeight()<<"\n";

    cout<<obj.getHeight()<<"\n";

    A obj1(1,2);

    Test obj2(obj1);

    cout<<obj2.getWeight()<<"\n";

    cout<<obj2.getHeight()<<"\n";

    return 0;
}

As far my understanding i think this mechanism will work.

share|improve this answer
    
Erm... height and width are not const, so I really don't see your point here... –  Elazar Leibovich Aug 13 '10 at 11:15
    
If you consider the Test Class then you can see there itself the height and wieght is const . So if you consider the class Image is nothing but Test class in that case you can find out that the member variables are const over there. Actually my point of writing this is to show without embedding the class obj i.e. class A you can assign const variables for Test class from class A and in this case actually the copy constructor will also act as an default constructor.So i think my purpose will be solved. –  indrajit Aug 13 '10 at 11:44

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