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I had asked question about lock in here and people responded there is no problem in my lock implementation. But i catched problem. Here is same lock implementation and i am getting weird result. I expect to see numbers starts from 1 but it starts from 5.Example is at below.

class Program
{
    static object locker = new object();
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
        {
            (new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(dostuff))).Start(j);
        }
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
    static void dostuff(dynamic input)
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(input);
        }
    }
}
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1  
What is your weird result? –  msteiger Aug 12 '10 at 7:59

3 Answers 3

The code is fine. But you cannot guarantee the order the threads are executed in. When I run the code I get:

0 1 3 5 2 4 6 10 9 11 7 12 8 etc

If you need to run the threads in a specified order, you could look into using ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem instead.

class Program
{
      static object locker = new object();
      static EventWaitHandle clearCount 
          =new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.ManualReset);
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
    {
       ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(dostuff, j);
    }
    clearCount.WaitOne();
  }
  static void dostuff(dynamic input)
  {
    lock (locker)
    {
      Console.WriteLine(input);
          if (input == 99) clearCount.Set();
     }
   }
}
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Why not gurantee ordered results ? Are you sure that no need threads if expection ordered list ? –  Freshblood Aug 12 '10 at 8:02
2  
Because when you spin up a new thread, you don't really know when that specific thread is done with creation and when it's executed (handled by the runtime). Also, if one thread takes longer to execute for some reason, then other threads will end before, and the result will be "random". That's also the case with the ThreadPool. But with the ThreadPool you know the order threads are started in, but not necessarily in what order they are finished. –  Mikael Svenson Aug 12 '10 at 8:11
    
Allright but my method is not fit for WaitCallback method so is there a way to use ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem for different type of delegates ? –  Freshblood Aug 12 '10 at 8:30
    
@Freshblood: You need something to tell you when the last thread is done executing. If you know beforehand how many threads you are using you can use a counter and (Interlocked.Increment) and then check if you have reached the target, then signal the EventHandle. Much like the code I already wrote. Why can't you use a waithandle? –  Mikael Svenson Aug 12 '10 at 8:34
    
@ Mikael Svenson - Would be possible to use in this example but not possible in my spesific codes. I shouldn't wait any thread. All iteration waiting input from user then process it on another thread so if i wait end of thread for start next one, i couldn't listen user inputs in that moment. –  Freshblood Aug 12 '10 at 8:52

It doesn't make sense to put a lock where you're putting it, as you're not locking code which changes a value shared by multiple threads. The section of code you're locking doesn't change any variables at all.

The reason the numbers are out of order is because the threads aren't guaranteed to start in any particular order, unless you do something like @Mikael Svenson suggests.

For an example of a shared variable, if you use this code:

class Program
{
    static object locker = new object();
    static int count=0;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
        {
            (new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(dostuff))).Start(j);
        }
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    static void dostuff(object Id)
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            count++;
            Console.WriteLine("Thread {0}: Count is {1}", Id, count);
        }
    }
}

You'll probably see that the Thread numbers aren't in order, but the count is. If you remove the lock statement, the count won't be in order either.

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1  
And if you remove the lock the final count might be less than 100. –  Henk Holterman Aug 12 '10 at 8:32

You have a couple of problems and wrong assumptions here.

  • Creating 100 threads in this fashion is not recommended.
  • The threads are not going to execute in the order they are started.
  • Placing the lock where you have it will effectively serialize the execution of the threads immediately removing any advantage you were hoping to gain by using threading.

The best approach to use is to partition your problem into separate independent chunks which can be computed simultaneously using only the least amount of thread synchronization as possible. These partitions should be executed on small and fairly static number of threads. You can use the ThreadPool, Parallel, or Task classes for doing this.

I have included a sample pattern using the Parallel.For method. To make the sample easy to understand lets say you have a list of objects that you want to clone and land into a separate list. Lets assume the clone operation is expensive and that you want to parallelize the cloning of many objects. Here is how you would do it. Notice the placement and limited use of the lock keyword.

public static void Main()
{
  List<ICloneable> original = GetCloneableObjects();
  List<ICloneable> copies = new List<ICloneable>();
  Parallel.For(0, 100,
    i =>
    {
      ICloneable cloneable = original[i];
      ICloneable copy = cloneable.Clone();
      lock (copies)
      {
        copies.Add(copy);
      }
    });
}
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i decided to ask another question. –  Freshblood Aug 12 '10 at 17:38
    
@Freshblood, Would have been more friendly to link to that another question –  Fulproof Mar 9 '13 at 14:59
    
@Brian Gideon, what's the point of including a sample code that does not compile and it is very unclear how to run or understand it? –  Fulproof Mar 9 '13 at 15:00
    
@Fulproof: Brevity was the main point of omitting some of the code. And, yes, it does require some leg work from the reader to understand it. I really wanted to put the focus on an alternative that 1) does not require creating 100 threads and prevents the serialization effect of locking which were problems in the OP's original question. Keeping the example short usually allows people to see the important parts of the pattern at a glance without getting distracted by the details. –  Brian Gideon Mar 9 '13 at 15:40

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