Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

All of us who work with relational databases have learned (or are learning) that SQL is different. Eliciting the desired results, and doing so efficiently, involves a tedious process partly characterized by learning unfamiliar paradigms, and finding out that some of our most familiar programming patterns don't work here. What are the common antipatterns you've seen (or yourself committed)?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by casperOne Jun 22 '12 at 17:06

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

show 3 more comments

40 Answers

Joining redundant tables into a query like this:

select emp.empno, dept.deptno
from emp
join dept on dept.deptno = emp.deptno;
share|improve this answer
5  
That actually does do something: It only returns the emp rows if the corresponding dept row exists. –  Ariel Oct 6 '11 at 8:43
show 1 more comment

Using primary keys as a surrogate for record addresses and using foreign keys as a surrogate for pointers embedded in records.

share|improve this answer
add comment

My favourite SQL anti-patterns:

JOIN on non-unique columns and using SELECT DISTINCT to trim the result.

Creating a view joining many tables just to select few columns from one table.

 CREATE VIEW my_view AS 
     SELECT * FROM table1
     JOIN table2 ON (...)
     JOIN table3 ON (...);

 SELECT col1, col2 FROM my_view WHERE col3 = 123;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Application Joins Not solely an SQL issue, but looking for descriptions of the problem and finding this question, I was surprised it wasn't listed.

As I've heard the phrase used, an application join, is when you pull a set of rows out of each of two or more tables and then join them in your (Java) code with a pair of nested for loops. This burdens the system (your app and the database) with having to identify the whole cross product, retrieving it and sending it to the appication. Assuming the app can filter the cross product down as fast as the database (dubious), just cutting the result set down sooner means less data transfer.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Maybe not an anti pattern but it annoys me is when DBA's of certain DB's (ok I'm talking about Oracle here) write SQL Server code using Oracle style and code conventions and complain when it runs so bad. Enough with the cursors Oracle people! SQL is meant to be set based.

share|improve this answer
4  
I think this is more related to your DBA than it is to Oracle. Oracle advices people to think and act set based too instead of row by row procedural thinking with cursors. –  tuinstoel Jan 1 '09 at 13:37
show 2 more comments

Having 1 table

code_1
value_1
code_2
value_2
...
code_10
value_10

Instead of having 3 tables

code, value and code_value

You never know when you may have need more than 10 couples code, value.

You don't waste disk space if you only need one couple.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not using the With clause or a proper join and relying on sub-queries.

Anti-Pattern:

select 
 ...
from data
where RECORD.STATE IN (
          SELECT STATEID
            FROM STATE
           WHERE NAME IN
                    ('Published to test',
                     'Approved for public',
                     'Published to public',
                     'Archived'
                    ))

Better:
I like using the with clause to make my intent more readable.

with valid_states as (
          SELECT STATEID
            FROM STATE
           WHERE NAME IN
                    ('Published to test',
                     'Approved for public',
                     'Published to public',
                     'Archived'
                    )
select  ... from data, valid_states
where data.state = valid_states.state

Best:

select 
  ... 
from data join states using (state)
where 
states.state in  ('Published to test',
                     'Approved for public',
                     'Published to public',
                     'Archived'
                    )
share|improve this answer
show 1 more comment

I just came across view definition like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE FORCE VIEW PRICE (PART_NUMBER, PRICE_LIST, LIST_VERSION ...)
AS
  SELECT sp.MKT_PART_NUMBER,
    sp.PRICE_LIST,
    sp.LIST_VERSION,
    sp.MIN_PRICE,
    sp.UNIT_PRICE,
    sp.MAX_PRICE,
...

There are 50 or so columns in the view. Some developers take a small pride torturing others by not providing column aliases, so one have to count column offset in both places in order to be able to figure out what column in a view corresponds to.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.