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I have a template class which looks like the following:

template <template <class TypeT> class PoolT=pool_base>
struct pool_map
{
public:
  template <typename U> struct pool { typedef PoolT<U> type };

public:
  template <typename T, size_t S=sizeof(T)>
  T& get( size_t index );

private:
  pool<uint8_t>::type  pool8_;
  pool<uint16_t>::type pool16_;
  pool<uint32_t>::type pool32_;
  pool<uint64_t>::type pool64_;
};

template <template <class TypeT> class PoolT>
template <typename T, size_t S>
inline
T& pool_map<PoolT>::get( size_t index )
{
  // Default case
}

template <template <class TypeT> class PoolT>
template <typename T>
inline
T& pool_map<PoolT>::get<T,8>( size_t index )
{
  // Dispatch to pool8_
}

template <template <class TypeT> class PoolT>
template <typename T>
inline
T& pool_map<PoolT>::get<T,16>( size_t index )
{
  // Dispatch to pool16_
}

template <template <class TypeT> class PoolT>
template <typename T>
inline
T& pool_map<PoolT>::get<T,32>( size_t index )
{
  // Dispatch to pool32_
}

You obviously noticed that I wrote what would be possible in a wonderful and ideal world where default template parameters and partial specialization of template methods are possible (without specializing the entire class).

I would like to ear about advices to achieve the same effect, that is, being able to have a specialized method for each size S so that I can select the proper pool to use. I tried to add a get_pool<size_t> inside the pool_map, but almost the same problem happens: i can't specialize the inner class without specializing the outer one...

The only solution that comes to my mind, would be to use an outer get_pool<size_t> class that would take the pool_map as parameters an returns a reference to the poolX_ member, but I would like to avoid it, since it does not seems to be "the real static way".

Thanks for reading!

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is one easy solution (maybe you didn't think about it), which is:

template <typename T>
T& pool_map<PoolT>::get( size_t index )
{
  if (sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT == 8) {
     // Dispatch to pool8_
  } else if (sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT == 16) {
     // Dispatch to pool16_
  } else if (...) {
     ...
  } else {
    // Default case
  }
}

But since this will maybe give you compilation errors (depending on what you put instead of "dispatch to ...") you could simply overload the get() function.

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT == 8,T>::type&
    get( size_t index )
{
   ...
}

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT == 16,T>::type&
    get( size_t index )
{
   ...
}

etc.

The only problem is that the default implementation (if you need any) needs a condition like sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT != 8 && sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT != 16 && sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT != 32 && sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT != 64

The last solution (the best one I'd say) would still to use a private class with a static function which you can specialize (what you said was not the "real static way")

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I managed to solve it. Thanks for your very accurate and exhaustive answer :) –  Aurélien Vallée Aug 13 '10 at 13:03
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One solution is the use of enable_if and disable_if (normally) though I haven't tested it.

Another solution is to simply forward the implementation details to a helper:

namespace helper
{
  template <class T> struct getter { static void Do() {} };

  // specializations by type
}

template <class T>
T& pool_map<T>::get(size_t index) { return helper::getter<T>::Do(); }
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