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Why does the std::cout line in the following code run even though A and B are different?

#include <iostream>

enum T { A = 1, B = 2 };
// #define A 1
// #define B 2

int main() {
#if (A == B)
    std::cout << A << B;
#endif
}

If I use #define instead (as commented out), I get no output as I expect.

Reason for the question:

I want to have a mode selector for some test code in which I can easily change modes by commenting/uncommenting lines on top:

enum T { MODE_RGB = 1, MODE_GREY = 2, MODE_CMYK = 3 };
// #define MODE MODE_RGB
#define MODE MODE_GREY
// #define MODE MODE_CMYK

int main() {
#if (MODE == MODE_RGB)
    // do RGB stuff
#elif (MODE == MODE_GREY)
    // do greyscale stuff
#else
    // do CMYK stuff
#endif

    // some common code

    some_function(arg1, arg2,
#if (MODE == MODE_RGB)
        // RGB calculation for arg3,
#elif (MODE == MODE_GREY)
        // greyscale calculation for arg3,
#else
        // CMYK calculation for arg3,
#endif
        arg4, arg5);
}

I know I can use numeric values e.g.

#define MODE 1 // RGB
...
#if (MODE == 1) // RGB

but it makes the code less readable.

Is there an elegant solution for this?

share|improve this question
2  
This is another one of those "the same name doesn't necessarily always refer to the same thing" things. If you uncomment the #defines and move them before the enum you'll get compilation errors. – molbdnilo Jan 8 at 12:44
    
Using #define MODE_RGB 1 and #define MODE MODE_RGB seems elegant enough to me. – Beta Carotin Jan 8 at 13:57
up vote 113 down vote accepted

There are no macros called A or B, so on your #if line, A and B get replaced by 0, so you actually have:

enum T { A = 1, B = 2 };

int main() {
#if (0 == 0)
    std::cout << A << B;
#endif
}

The preprocessor runs before the compiler knows anything about your enum. The preprocessor only knows about macros (#define).

share|improve this answer
3  
"The preprocessor only knows about macros (#define)" is not totally correct; I'd rather say "[...] only deals with macros". – black Jan 9 at 14:50
1  
To elaborate, you can define preprocessor macros with command line arguments (rather useful to be able to compile debug versions of a binary without changing any code). And of course, the compiler is free to allow other external methods to define preprocessor macros (without checking, I imagine IDEs would allow saving such data into a configuration file). – Kat Jan 12 at 14:11

This is because the preprocessor works before compile time.

As the enum definitions occur at compile time, A and B will both be defined as empty (pp-number 0) - and thus equal - at pre-processing time, and thus the output statement is included in the compiled code.

When you use #define they are defined differently at pre-processing time and thus the statement evaluates to false.

In relation to your comment about what you want to do, you don't need to use pre-processor #if to do this. You can just use the standard if as both MODE and MODE_GREY (or MODE_RGB or MODE_CMYK) are all still defined:

#include <iostream>

enum T { MODE_RGB = 1, MODE_GREY = 2, MODE_CMYK = 3 };

#define MODE MODE_GREY

int main()
{
    if( MODE == MODE_GREY )
        std::cout << "Grey mode" << std::endl;
    else if( MODE == MODE_RGB )
        std::cout << "RGB mode" << std::endl;
    else if( MODE == MODE_CMYK )
        std::cout << "CMYK mode" << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

The other option using only the pre-processor is to do this as @TripeHound correctly answered below.

share|improve this answer
    
Why are they "defined as empty"? I had always thought "defined empty" means what you get if you simply #define foo, which results in it being replaced with blank space anywhere it appears in source code (resulting in, usually, a syntax error if you try to use it somewhere a value belongs). – Random832 Jan 8 at 14:26
    
@Random832 sorry my choice of "random" probably wasn't a great word here. Things that are #defined without an explicit definition are given the pp-number 0. (C99 Standard) – Samidamaru Jan 8 at 14:38
    
@Samidamaru: Thanks for your update. The reason I can't use a conventional if is that the preprocessor #if blocks contain further preprocessor commands e.g. #defines. I know it's a mess, but it just for a throwaway test program :-) – Gnubie Jan 8 at 16:05
    
@Gnubie fair enough. Well, looks like you can either do this or the #define method which you commented on below (TripeHound's answer). I think they're the only realistic solutions :). Hope I helped anyway. Don't forget to accept the best answer you've gotten if they answered your question to help future users! – Samidamaru Jan 8 at 16:31
1  
@Lawrence That's a much better idea. Thanks :). – Samidamaru Jan 10 at 1:44

Identifiers that are not defined macros are interpreted as value 0 in conditional preprocessor directives. Therefore, since you hadn't defined macros A and B, they are both considered 0 and two 0 are equal to each other.

The reason why undefined (to the pre-processor) identifiers are considered 0 is because it allows using undefined macros in the conditional without using #ifdef.

share|improve this answer
    
Just upping this since you are the only one one actually points out that NON defined is treat as 0. Didn't know so far – Zaibis Jan 8 at 13:39

The preprocessor runs before the compiler, which means that the preprocessor doesn't know anything about symbols defined by the compiler and therefore it can't act depending on them.

share|improve this answer
    
Please see reasoning above. – Gnubie Jan 8 at 13:30
1  
@Gnubie you don't need to use the preprocessor #if for this. See my edit to my answer above. – Samidamaru Jan 8 at 14:03

As the other answers said, the C preprocessor doesn't see enums. It expects, and can only understand, macros.

Per the C99 standard, §6.10.1 (Conditional inclusion):

After all replacements due to macro expansion and the defined unary operator have been performed, all remaining identifiers are replaced with the pp-number 0

In other words, in an #if or #elif directive, any macros that cannot be expanded, because they don't exist/are undefined, will behave exactly as if they'd been defined as 0, and therefore will always be equal to each other.

You can catch likely unintended behavior like this in GCC/clang with the warning option -Wundef (you'll probably want to make it fatal with -Werror=undef).

share|improve this answer

Other answers explain why what you're trying doesn't work; for an alternative, I'd probably go with:

#define RGB 1
#define GREY 2
#define CMYK 3
#define MODE RGB

#if MODE == RGB
    //RGB-mode code
#elif MODE == GREY
    //Greyscale code
#elif MODE == CMYK
    //CMYK code
#else
#    error Undefined MODE
#endif

You might want prefixes on the RGB/GREY/CMYK if there's a danger of clashes with "real" source code.

share|improve this answer
    
That was my first thought, then I thought I could be clever and use an enum, and then wondered why it didn't work... – Gnubie Jan 8 at 16:06
2  
@Gnubie Learn to ignore or at least seriously distrust the little voices that say "this could be done cleverly using <x>"....they'll usually lead you astray. "Clever" is not often "good". – Kyle Strand Jan 8 at 20:58

The posts have explained why, but a possible solution for you that keeps readability might be like this

#define MODE_RGB

int main()
{        
    #ifdef MODE_RGB
        std::cout << "RGB mode" << std::endl;
    #elif defined MODE_GREY
        std::cout << "Grey mode" << std::endl;
    #elif defined MODE_CMYK
        std::cout << "CMYK mode" << std::endl;
    #endif
}

You just then need to change the macro at the top, to only the macro you are interested in is defined. You could also include a check to make sure that one and only one is defined and if not then and do #error "You must define MODE_RGB, MODE_GREY or MODE_CMYK

share|improve this answer
1  
Great idea! I think I'll use this technique. – Gnubie Jan 13 at 12:39

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