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Actually I'm doing some tests with Mockito.

I have the following class:

class BaseService {  
    public void save() {...}  
}

public Childservice extends BaseService {  
    public void save(){  
        //some codes    
        super.save();
    }  
}   

I want to mock only the second call (super.save) of the ChildService and do nothing so the test is successful. The first call must call the real method. Is there a way to do that?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 23 down vote accepted

No, Mockito does not support this.

This might not be the answer you're looking for, but what you're seeing is a symptom of not applying the design principle:

Favor composition over inheritance

If you extract a strategy instead of extending a super class the problem is gone.

If however you are not allowed to change the code, but you must test it anyway, and in this awkward way, there is still hope. With some AOP tools (for example AspectJ) you can weave code into the super class method and avoid its execution entirely (yuck). This doesn't work if you're using proxies, you have to use bytecode modification (either load time weaving or compile time weaving). There might be mocking frameworks that support this type of trick as well.

I suggest you go for the refactoring, but if that is not an option you're in for some serious hacking fun.

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I'm not seeing the LSP violation. I have roughly the same setup as the OP: a base DAO class with a findAll() method, and a subclass DAO that overrides the base method by calling super.findAll() and then sorting the result. The subclass is substitutable into all contexts accepting the superclass. Am I misunderstanding your meaning? –  Willie Wheeler Jul 8 '11 at 21:55
    
I'll remove the LSP remark (it doesn't add value to the answer). –  iwein Aug 2 '11 at 8:40

If you really don't have a choice for refactoring you can mock/stub everything in the super method call e.g.

class BaseService{
    public void save(){
        validate();
    }
}

public ChildService extends BaseService{
    public void save(){
        super.save()
        load();
    }
}

@Test
public void testSave() {
    ClildService spy = Mockito.spy(new ChildService());

    // Prevent/stub logic in super.save()
    Mockito.doNothing().when((BaseService)spy).validate();

    // When
    spy.save();

    // Then
    verify(spy).load();
}
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1  
mind if I merge this into my answer? It's a better suggestion than going for bytecode weaving. –  iwein Aug 2 '11 at 8:45
    
this code wouldn't actually prevent the super.save() invocation right, so if you do a lot in the super.save() you'd have to prevent all those calls... –  iwein Aug 2 '11 at 8:47
    
fantastic solution works wonders for me when I want to return a mocked value from a superclass method for use by the child, fantastic thank you. –  Gurnard May 31 '12 at 14:18
    
Thank you very much. –  Saeed Zarinfam Jan 28 '13 at 9:42
1  
this works nice unless the validate is hidden or the save method does the work directly instead of calling an other method. mockito does not: Mockito.doNothing().when((BaseService)spy).save(); this will not 'doNothing on the base service save but on the childService save :( –  tibi Aug 15 '13 at 12:47

create a package protected (assumes test class in same package) method in the sub class that calls the super class method and then call that method in your overridden sub class method. you can then set expectations on this method in your test through the use of the spy pattern. not pretty but certainly better than having to deal with all the expectation setting for the super method in your test

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can I also say that composition over inheritance is almost always better, but sometimes its simply just simpler to use inheritance. until java incorporates a better compositional model, like scala or groovy, this will always be the case and this issue will continue to exist –  Luke May 22 '12 at 22:07

Consider refactoring the code from ChildService.save() method to different method and test that new method instead of testing ChildService.save(), this way you will avoid unnecessary call to super method.

Example:

class BaseService {  
    public void save() {...}  
}

public Childservice extends BaseService {  
    public void save(){  
        newMethod();    
        super.save();
    }
    public void newMethod(){
       //some codes
    }
} 
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The reason is your base class is not public-ed, then Mockito cannot intercept it due to visibility, if you change base class as public, or @Override in sub class (as public), then Mockito can mock it correctly.

public class BaseService{
  public boolean foo(){
    return true;
  }
}

public ChildService extends BaseService{
}

@Test
@Mock ChildService childService;
public void testSave() {
  Mockito.when(childService.foo()).thenReturn(false);

  // When
  assertFalse(childService.foo());
}
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