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I'm trying to load some decimal values from a file but I can't work out the correct way to take the raw values and convert them into decimals.

I've read the file out into a byte array, and each chunk of four bytes is supposed to represent one decimal value. To help figure it out, I've constructed a table of how the decimal values 1 through to 46 are represented as four byte chunks.

For instance, the number 1 appears as 0,0,128,63 the number 2 as 0,0,0,64 and so on up to 46, which is 0,0,56,66. The full table is available here.

There is also another series of numbers which go to three decimal places and include negatives, which is here.

The only documentation I have states

They are stored least significant byte first: 1's, 256's, 65536's, 16777216's. This makes the hex sequence 01 01 00 00 into the number 257 (decimal). In C/C++, to read e.g. a float, do: float x; fread(&x, sizeof(float), 1, fileptr);

However I'm using .NET's File.ReadAllBytes method so this isn't much help. If anyone can spare a few minutes to look at the examples files and see if they can spot a way to convert the values to decimals I'd be most grateful.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use BitConverter.ToSingle to read a float value from a byte array, so to get a sequence of floats, you could do something like this:

byte[] data = File.ReadAllBytes(fileName);
int count = data.Length / 4;
Debug.Assert(data.Length % 4 == 0);

IEnumerable<float> values = Enumerable.Range(0, count)
    .Select(i => BitConverter.ToSingle(data, i*4));
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I've marked this correct as it is slightly more detailed. Thanks very much, wasn't expecting it to be this simple. –  gilles27 Aug 12 '10 at 13:21

Have you looked into using the BitConverter class? It converts between byte arrays and various types.

Edit: MSDN has a helpful comment on the documentation for BitConverter at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.bitconverter_methods(v=vs.85).aspx:

public static decimal ToDecimal(byte[] bytes)
{
  int[] bits = new int[4];
  bits[0] = ((bytes[0] | (bytes[1] << 8)) | (bytes[2] << 0x10)) | (bytes[3] << 0x18); //lo
  bits[1] = ((bytes[4] | (bytes[5] << 8)) | (bytes[6] << 0x10)) | (bytes[7] << 0x18); //mid
  bits[2] = ((bytes[8] | (bytes[9] << 8)) | (bytes[10] << 0x10)) | (bytes[11] << 0x18); //hi
  bits[3] = ((bytes[12] | (bytes[13] << 8)) | (bytes[14] << 0x10)) | (bytes[15] << 0x18); //flags

  return new decimal(bits);
}

public static byte[] GetBytes(decimal d)
{
  byte[] bytes = new byte[16];

  int[] bits = decimal.GetBits(d);
  int lo = bits[0];
  int mid = bits[1];
  int hi = bits[2];
  int flags = bits[3];

  bytes[0] = (byte)lo;
  bytes[1] = (byte)(lo >> 8);
  bytes[2] = (byte)(lo >> 0x10);
  bytes[3] = (byte)(lo >> 0x18);
  bytes[4] = (byte)mid;
  bytes[5] = (byte)(mid >> 8);
  bytes[6] = (byte)(mid >> 0x10);
  bytes[7] = (byte)(mid >> 0x18);
  bytes[8] = (byte)hi;
  bytes[9] = (byte)(hi >> 8);
  bytes[10] = (byte)(hi >> 0x10);
  bytes[11] = (byte)(hi >> 0x18);
  bytes[12] = (byte)flags;
  bytes[13] = (byte)(flags >> 8);
  bytes[14] = (byte)(flags >> 0x10);
  bytes[15] = (byte)(flags >> 0x18);

  return bytes;
}
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Thanks this is definitely the way to go. –  gilles27 Aug 12 '10 at 13:22
    
Unfortunately, It does not implement decimal conversion. –  Eran Betzalel Apr 14 '13 at 20:22
    
@EranBetzalel MSDN has some code to implement the "missing" members of BitConverter. See my edited update. –  BlueMonkMN Apr 14 '13 at 20:51
    
@BlueMonkMN, it's not MSDN's, it's just some guy that posted it there, he probably took it from the same place I took it from - .Net decomplided libraries. It has nothing to do with BitConvertor. –  Eran Betzalel Apr 15 '13 at 13:53
    
@EranBetzalel My point was that it's MSDN's site that contains the content and BitConverter's page where the content can be found. I don't claim that it's intrinsically connected to MSDN or bitconverter (I even noted that it was a "comment") . But a solution is a solution regardless of who wrote it or where. Now the solution is here on StackOverflow. It's up to you, the coder, to see if the code is suitable for you, not to determine it based on the credentials of where it came from. The code can be judged independently on its own merits. –  BlueMonkMN Apr 16 '13 at 13:39

As others have mentioned, use the BitConverter class, see the example below:

     byte[] bytez = new byte[] { 0x00, 0x00, 0x80, 0x3F };
     float flt = BitConverter.ToSingle(bytez, 0); // 1.0

     bytez = new byte[] { 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x40 };
     flt = BitConverter.ToSingle(bytez, 0); // 2.0

     bytez = new byte[] { 0, 0, 192, 190 };
     flt = BitConverter.ToSingle(bytez, 0); // -0.375
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The .NET library implemented Decimal.GetBytes() method internally.

I've used the decompiled .NET library to create a simple conversion methods between decimal and byte arrary - you can find it here:

https://gist.github.com/eranbetzalel/5384006#file-decimalbytesconvertor-cs

EDIT : Here is the full source code from my link.

public decimal BytesToDecimal(byte[] buffer, int offset = 0)
{
  var decimalBits = new int[4];

  decimalBits[0] = buffer[offset + 0] | (buffer[offset + 1] << 8) | (buffer[offset + 2] << 16) | (buffer[offset + 3] << 24);
  decimalBits[1] = buffer[offset + 4] | (buffer[offset + 5] << 8) | (buffer[offset + 6] << 16) | (buffer[offset + 7] << 24);
  decimalBits[2] = buffer[offset + 8] | (buffer[offset + 9] << 8) | (buffer[offset + 10] << 16) | (buffer[offset + 11] << 24);
  decimalBits[3] = buffer[offset + 12] | (buffer[offset + 13] << 8) | (buffer[offset + 14] << 16) | (buffer[offset + 15] << 24);

  return new Decimal(decimalBits);
}

public byte[] DecimalToBytes(decimal number)
{
  var decimalBuffer = new byte[16];

  var decimalBits = Decimal.GetBits(number);

  var lo = decimalBits.Value[0];
  var mid = decimalBits.Value[1];
  var hi = decimalBits.Value[2];
  var flags = decimalBits.Value[3];

  decimalBuffer[0] = (byte)lo;
  decimalBuffer[1] = (byte)(lo >> 8);
  decimalBuffer[2] = (byte)(lo >> 16);
  decimalBuffer[3] = (byte)(lo >> 24);

  decimalBuffer[4] = (byte)mid;
  decimalBuffer[5] = (byte)(mid >> 8);
  decimalBuffer[6] = (byte)(mid >> 16);
  decimalBuffer[7] = (byte)(mid >> 24);

  decimalBuffer[8] = (byte)hi;
  decimalBuffer[9] = (byte)(hi >> 8);
  decimalBuffer[10] = (byte)(hi >> 16);
  decimalBuffer[11] = (byte)(hi >> 24);

  decimalBuffer[12] = (byte)flags;
  decimalBuffer[13] = (byte)(flags >> 8);
  decimalBuffer[14] = (byte)(flags >> 16);
  decimalBuffer[15] = (byte)(flags >> 24);

  return decimalBuffer;
}
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