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In C#, say that you want to pull a value off of PropertyC in this example and ObjectA, PropertyA and PropertyB can all be null.

ObjectA.PropertyA.PropertyB.PropertyC

How can I get PropertyC safely with the least amount of code?

Right now I would check:

if(ObjectA != null && ObjectA.PropertyA !=null && ObjectA.PropertyA.PropertyB != null)
{
// safely pull off the value
int value = objectA.PropertyA.PropertyB.PropertyC;
}

It would be nice to do something more like this (pseudo-code).

int value = ObjectA.PropertyA.PropertyB ? ObjectA.PropertyA.PropertyB : defaultVal;

Possibly even further collapsed with a null-coalescing operator.

EDIT Originally I said my second example was like js, but I changed it to psuedo-code since it was correctly pointed out that it would not work in js.

Thanks much, Jon

share|improve this question
    
i don't see how your js example works. you should get an "object expected" error whenever ObjectA or PropertyA are null. –  lincolnk Aug 12 '10 at 13:47
    
Thanks lincolnk, you are right so I changed it to pseudo-code. –  Jon Kragh Aug 12 '10 at 14:19

20 Answers 20

Short Extension Method:

public static TResult IfNotNull<TInput, TResult>(this TInput o, Func<TInput, TResult> evaluator)
  where TResult : class where TInput : class
{
  if (o == null) return null;
  return evaluator(o);
}

Using

PropertyC value = ObjectA.IfNotNull(x => x.PropertyA).IfNotNull(x => x.PropertyB).IfNotNull(x => x.PropertyC);

This simple extension method and much more you can find on http://devtalk.net/csharp/chained-null-checks-and-the-maybe-monad/

EDIT:

After using it for moment I think the proper name for this method should be IfNotNull() instead of original With().

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't this not work with int? Your TResult is restricted to class. It would work as int?. –  Davor Aug 19 '14 at 12:10
    
@Davor It will not work with int, cause int is a struct(ure). It is different from class in many ways and cannot be null. Ints just does not have a problems we are trying to solve here :) –  Krzysztof Morcinek Aug 19 '14 at 12:57
    
Yes, but you're using int as the return type in your example, which wouldn't work. That's what I was pointing out. –  Davor Aug 19 '14 at 15:04
    
@Davor, you are right. I didn't get the point at first. I edited the code. Thx –  Krzysztof Morcinek Aug 19 '14 at 17:11

Can you add a method to your class? If not, have you thought about using extension methods? You could create an extension method for your object type called GetPropC().

Example:

public static class MyExtensions
{
    public static int GetPropC(this MyObjectType obj, int defaltValue)
    {
        if (obj != null && obj.PropertyA != null & obj.PropertyA.PropertyB != null)
            return obj.PropertyA.PropertyB.PropertyC;
        return defaltValue;
    }
}

Usage:

int val = ObjectA.GetPropC(0); // will return PropC value, or 0 (defaltValue)

By the way, this assumes you are using .NET 3 or higher.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will definitely encapsulate this check someplace appropriate. –  Jon Kragh Aug 12 '10 at 14:23
1  
+1 - I use extension methods for problems such as this. –  James Black Oct 9 '10 at 19:15

The way you're doing it is correct.

You could use a trick like the one described here, using Linq expressions :

int value = ObjectA.NullSafeEval(x => x.PropertyA.PropertyB.PropertyC, 0);

But it's much slower that manually checking each property...

share|improve this answer

Refactor to observe the Law of Demeter

share|improve this answer
    
I don't consider an object graph only three levels deep to be in need of refactoring when you're only reading properties. I'd agree if the OP wanted to call a method on an object referenced through PropertyC but not when it's a property that only needs checking for null before reading. In this example it could be as simple as Customer.Address.Country where Country could be a reference type such as KeyValuePair. How would you refactor this to prevent the need for the null ref checks? –  Darren Lewis Aug 12 '10 at 14:38
    
The OP example is actually 4 deep. My suggestion isn't to remove the null ref checks but to locate them in the objects most likely to be able to handle them properly. Like most "rules of thumb" there are exceptions but I'm not convinced this is one. Can we agree to disagree? –  rtalbot Aug 12 '10 at 15:12
3  
I agree with @rtalbot (though, in fairness @Daz Lewis is proposing a 4-deep example, since the last item is a KeyValuePair). If something is messing with a Customer object, then I don't see what business it has looking through the Address object-heirarchy. Suppose you later decide that a KeyValuePair wasn't such a great idea for the Country property. In that case, everybody's code has to change. That's not a good design. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Aug 12 '10 at 15:41

You're obviously looking for the Nullable Monad:

string result = new A().PropertyB.PropertyC.Value;

becomes

string result = from a in new A()
                from b in a.PropertyB
                from c in b.PropertyC
                select c.Value;

This returns null, if any of the nullable properties are null; otherwise, the value of Value.

class A { public B PropertyB { get; set; } }
class B { public C PropertyC { get; set; } }
class C { public string Value { get; set; } }

LINQ extension methods:

public static class NullableExtensions
{
    public static TResult SelectMany<TOuter, TInner, TResult>(
        this TOuter source,
        Func<TOuter, TInner> innerSelector,
        Func<TOuter, TInner, TResult> resultSelector)
        where TOuter : class
        where TInner : class
        where TResult : class
    {
        if (source == null) return null;
        TInner inner = innerSelector(source);
        if (inner == null) return null;
        return resultSelector(source, inner);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why is the extension method here? It's not being used. –  Mladen Mihajlovic Feb 4 '14 at 14:47
    
@MladenMihajlovic: the SelectMany extension method is used by the from ... in ... from ... in ... syntax. –  dtb Feb 4 '14 at 15:27
    
Ah thanks @dtb - I didn't know that. I'm actually coming up empty trying to find linq explanations like this. –  Mladen Mihajlovic Feb 12 '14 at 11:32

This code is "the least amount of code", but not the best practice:

try
{
    return ObjectA.PropertyA.PropertyB.PropertyC;
}
catch(NullReferenceException)
{
     return null;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
You should probably catch a NullReferenceException, instead of all. –  recursive Aug 12 '10 at 13:54
1  
Ew please do not promote code like this. You could be catching anything. For all we know PropertyC is totally fine, but PropertyB threw an InvalidOperationException –  Matt Greer Aug 12 '10 at 13:55
2  
Guys, I completely agree with you. This way is far from be "elegant", but the question asked for "least amount of code", this condition is fulfilled. –  Boris Modylevsky Aug 12 '10 at 14:19
    
I've seen code like this alot and disregarding the performance loss the biggest issue is that it complicates debugging because the real exception drowns in millions of useless null ref exceptions. –  FuleSnabel Oct 16 '13 at 10:26
    
Sometimes it's amusing to read my own answer after 3 years. I think, I would answer differently today. I would say that the code violates Demeter's law and I would recommend refactoring it so it wouldn't. –  Boris Modylevsky Oct 16 '13 at 19:55

Assuming you have empty values of types one approach would be this:

var x = (((objectA ?? A.Empty).PropertyOfB ?? B.Empty).PropertyOfC ?? C.Empty).PropertyOfString;

I'm a big fan of C# but a very nice thing in new Java (1.7?) is the .? operator:

 var x = objectA.?PropertyOfB.?PropertyOfC.?PropertyOfString;
share|improve this answer
1  
Is it really going to be in Java 1.7 ? It's been requested in C# for a long time, but I doubt it will ever happen... –  Thomas Levesque Aug 12 '10 at 14:10
    
Unfortunately I don't have empty values. That Java syntax looks sweet though! I'm going to up-vote this, just because I want that syntax! –  Jon Kragh Aug 12 '10 at 14:48
3  
Thomas: Last time I checked tech.puredanger.com/java7 it implied Java would get it. But now when I recheck it says: Null safe handling : NO. So I revoke my statement and replace it with a new one: It was proposed for Java 1.7 but didn't make it. –  FuleSnabel Aug 12 '10 at 17:47
    
An additional approach is the one used by monad.net –  FuleSnabel Oct 16 '13 at 9:30

Check this blog post out. I think it's a very elegant method for chained null checks. There are many similar implementations of this, but I like this one because it stops evaluating as soon as a null is found in the chain.

All the source code is on github.

share|improve this answer

When I need to chain calls like that, I rely on a helper method I created, TryGet():

    public static U TryGet<T, U>(this T obj, Func<T, U> func)
    {
        return obj.TryGet(func, default(U));
    }

    public static U TryGet<T, U>(this T obj, Func<T, U> func, U whenNull)
    {
        return obj == null ? whenNull : func(obj);
    }

In your case, you would use it like so:

    int value = ObjectA
        .TryGet(p => p.PropertyA)
        .TryGet(p => p.PropertyB)
        .TryGet(p => p.PropertyC, defaultVal);
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this code works. What is the type of defaultVal? var p = new Person(); Assert.AreEqual( p.TryGet(x => x.FirstName) .TryGet(x => x.LastName) .TryGet(x => x.NickName, "foo"), "foo"); –  Keith Mar 4 at 19:44
    
The example I wrote should be read as such: ObjectA.PropertyA.PropertyB.PropertyC. Your code seems to be trying to load a property called "LastName" from "FirstName", which is not the intended usage. A more correct example would be something like: var postcode = person.TryGet(p => p.Address).TryGet(p => p.Postcode); By the way, my TryGet() helper method is very similar to a new feature in C# 6.0 - the null-conditional operator. Its usage will be like so: var postcode = person?.Address?.Postcode; msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dn802602.aspx –  Emanuel Mar 12 at 12:33

You could do this:

class ObjectAType
{
    public int PropertyC
    {
        get
        {
            if (PropertyA == null)
                return 0;
            if (PropertyA.PropertyB == null)
                return 0;
            return PropertyA.PropertyB.PropertyC;
        }
    }
}



if (ObjectA != null)
{
    int value = ObjectA.PropertyC;
    ...
}

Or even better might be this:

private static int GetPropertyC(ObjectAType objectA)
{
    if (objectA == null)
        return 0;
    if (objectA.PropertyA == null)
        return 0;
    if (objectA.PropertyA.PropertyB == null)
        return 0;
    return objectA.PropertyA.PropertyB.PropertyC;
}


int value = GetPropertyC(ObjectA);
share|improve this answer

It is not possible. ObjectA.PropertyA.PropertyB will fail if ObjectA is null due to null dereferencing, which is an error.

if(ObjectA != null && ObjectA.PropertyA ... works due to short circuiting, ie ObjectA.PropertyA will never be checked if ObjectA is null.

The first way you propose is the best and most clear with intent. If anything you could try to redesign without having to rely on so many nulls.

share|improve this answer

This approach is fairly straight-forward once you get over the lamda gobbly-gook:

public static TProperty GetPropertyOrDefault<TObject, TProperty>(this TObject model, Func<TObject, TProperty> valueFunc)  
                                                        where TObject : class
    {
        try
        {
            return valueFunc.Invoke(model);
        }
        catch (NullReferenceException nex)
        {
            return default(TProperty);
        }
    }

With usage that might look like:

ObjectA objectA = null;

Assert.AreEqual(0,objectA.GetPropertyOrDefault(prop=>prop.ObjectB.ObjectB.ObjectC.ID));

Assert.IsNull(objectA.GetPropertyOrDefault(prop => prop.ObjectB));
share|improve this answer

Just stumbled accross this post.

Some time ago I made a suggestion on Visual Studio Connect about adding a new ??? operator.

http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/suggestions/4104392-add-as-an-recursive-null-reference-check-opera

This would require some work from the framework team but don't need to alter the language but just do some compiler magic. The idea was that the compiler should change this code (syntax not allowed atm)

string product_name = Order.OrderDetails[0].Product.Name ??? "no product defined";

into this code

Func<string> _get_default = () => "no product defined"; 
string product_name = Order == null 
    ? _get_default.Invoke() 
    : Order.OrderDetails[0] == null 
        ? _get_default.Invoke() 
        : Order.OrderDetails[0].Product == null 
            ? _get_default.Invoke() 
            : Order.OrderDetails[0].Product.Name ?? _get_default.Invoke()

For null check this could look like

bool isNull = (Order.OrderDetails[0].Product ??? null) == null;
share|improve this answer

you can use the following extension and I think it is really good:

/// <summary>
/// Simplifies null checking
/// </summary>
public static TR Get<TF, TR>(TF t, Func<TF, TR> f)
    where TF : class
{
    return t != null ? f(t) : default(TR);
}

/// <summary>
/// Simplifies null checking
/// </summary>
public static TR Get<T1, T2, TR>(T1 p1, Func<T1, T2> p2, Func<T2, TR> p3)
    where T1 : class
    where T2 : class
{
    return Get(Get(p1, p2), p3);
}

/// <summary>
/// Simplifies null checking
/// </summary>
public static TR Get<T1, T2, T3, TR>(T1 p1, Func<T1, T2> p2, Func<T2, T3> p3, Func<T3, TR> p4)
    where T1 : class
    where T2 : class
    where T3 : class
{
    return Get(Get(Get(p1, p2), p3), p4);
}

And it is used like this:

int value = Nulify.Get(objectA, x=>x.PropertyA, x=>x.PropertyB, x=>x.PropertyC);
share|improve this answer

Null propagation planned in C# vNext, powered by Roslyn


Not an answer, but more of an update. It appears as though UserVoice has driven this, along with a raft of other new things, since Roslyn and is apparently a planned addition:

https://roslyn.codeplex.com/discussions/540883

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome news! Thanks for sharing. –  Jon Kragh May 3 '14 at 13:19

In C# 6 you can use the Null Conditional Operator. So the original test will be:

 int? value = objectA?.PropertyA?.PropertyB?.PropertyC;
share|improve this answer

I would write your own method in the type of PropertyA (or an extension method if it's not your type) using the similar pattern to the Nullable type.

class PropertyAType
{
   public PropertyBType PropertyB {get; set; }

   public PropertyBType GetPropertyBOrDefault()
   {
       return PropertyB != null ? PropertyB : defaultValue;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, in that case, obviously PropertyB can never be null. –  recursive Aug 12 '10 at 13:54
    
Good point, terrible choice of types there. –  Steve Danner Aug 12 '10 at 17:39

I wrote a method that accepts a default value, here is how to use it:

var teacher = new Teacher();
return teacher.GetProperty(t => t.Name);
return teacher.GetProperty(t => t.Name, "Default name");

Here is the code:

public static class Helper
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets a property if the object is not null.
    /// var teacher = new Teacher();
    /// return teacher.GetProperty(t => t.Name);
    /// return teacher.GetProperty(t => t.Name, "Default name");
    /// </summary>
    public static TSecond GetProperty<TFirst, TSecond>(this TFirst item1,
        Func<TFirst, TSecond> getItem2, TSecond defaultValue = default(TSecond))
    {
        if (item1 == null)
        {
            return defaultValue;
        }

        return getItem2(item1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution has already been provided in other answers (repeatedly). There is no reason at all to be posting it again. –  Servy Oct 8 '14 at 15:12
    
I didn't see any that accepst a default value. –  AkiraYamamoto Oct 8 '14 at 15:23
    
I count 6 others that utilize a defined default value. Apparently you didn't look all that hard. –  Servy Oct 8 '14 at 15:26
var result = nullableproperty ?? defaultvalue;

The ?? operator means if the first argument is null, return the second one instead.

share|improve this answer
2  
This answer doesn't solve the OP's problem. How would you apply the solution with ?? operator to ObjectA.PropertyA.PropertyB when all parts of the expression (ObjectA, PropertyA and PropertyB) can be null? –  Artemix May 10 '13 at 14:00
    
True, i think i didn't even read the question at all. Anyway, impossible is nothing just don't do it :P static void Main(string[] args) { a ca = new a(); var default_value = new a() { b = new object() }; var value = (ca ?? default_value).b ?? default_value.b; } class a { public object b = null; } –  Aridane Álamo Oct 22 '13 at 13:06
    
(ObjectA ?? DefaultMockedAtNull).PropertyA != null?ObjectA.PropertyA.PropertyB: null –  Aridane Álamo Jun 10 '14 at 14:55

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