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Situation:

Assembly 1
________________________             ________________________
| Class A               |           | Class B               |
|-----------------------|           |-----------------------|
| Method someMethod     |---------->| Method otherMethod    |
|                       |           |                       |
|_______________________|           |_______________________|

Assembly 1 is a application that other developers can use. We will give them only the .dll so we can publish updates from the application if we don't change the api. The developers can't change the framework in assembly 1

Methods are virtual so developers can override methods to implement there own logic if needed.

The problem is that a developer can't override otherMethod from class B, he can override it but Class A will always call the method from Class B and not the overridden method.

Assembly 1
________________________             ________________________
| Class A               |           | Class B               |
|-----------------------|           |-----------------------|
| Method someMethod     |----XX---->| Method otherMethod    |
|                       |           |                       |
|_______________________|           |_______________________|
                \                                    |
                 \                                   |
                  \                                  |
Assembly 2         \                                 |
                    \                ________________|_______
                     \               | Class ExtendedB       |
                      \              |-----------------------|
                       \____________>| Method otherMethod    |
                                     |                       |
                                     |_______________________|

Assembly 2 haves a reference to assembly 1

Partial class doesn't work because it must be the same assembly and will not work over 2

Are there design patterns for this problem ? Or is there a other solution with reflection or something ?

EDIT Added a code example:

/* ASSEMBLY 1 */

namespace Assembly1
{
    public interface IAService
    {
        void TestMethod3();
        void TestMethod4();
    }

    public interface IBService
    {
        void TestMethod1();
        void TestMethod2();
    }

    public class AService : IAService
    {
        // Base implementation of AService
        public  virtual void TestMethod3()
        {
            //do something
        }
        public virtual void TestMethod4()
        {
            //do something
        }
    }

    public class BService : IBService
    {
        // Base implementation of BService
        public virtual void TestMethod1()
        {
            //do something
        }
        public virtual void TestMethod2()
        {
            //need to call AService implementation from assembly 2
        }
    }
}   





/* ASSEMBLY 2 */
namespace Assembly2
{
    public class NewAService : AService
    {
        public override void TestMethod3()
        {
            //default implementation which could be overridden
            base.TestMethod3();
        }

        public override void TestMethod4()
        {
            //default implementation which could be overridden
            //An implementation of IBService Should be called

            base.TestMethod4();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
How do you call the Method on class B? Is it accessed statically? Does Assembly 2 (or any other assembly) pass an object of type ExtendedB to class A (dependency injection)? – dbemerlin Aug 12 '10 at 14:23
1  
Could you provide a code snippet? The diagrams don't describe the usage very well. – DevinB Aug 12 '10 at 14:30
    
People, why are we suggesting interface implementation before we even understand why inheritance is not allowing polymorphism? – Steven Sudit Aug 12 '10 at 16:19
    
Out of interest, how did you get those diagrams? Did you make them by hand or did you use something to make those? – horsedrowner Aug 16 '10 at 8:57
    
@horsedrowner i have make them by hand ;) – Marco Aug 16 '10 at 9:00
up vote 4 down vote accepted

you should refactor

public interface IClassB
{
   void SomeMethod();
}
public Class A
{
    private IClassB myInstanceB = new ClassB();

    public ClassA(){}

    public ClassA(IClass B)
    {
      myInstanceB = B;
    }

    public void SomeMethod()
    {
        myInstanceB.SomeMethod();
    }
}

public ClassB : IClassB
{
   public void SomeMethod()
   {
      // some wicked code here...
   }
}

with this refactoring done, developers can use the default implementation by using the empty constructor. if they need some other logic than they just have to implement the interface IClassB and just pass it in the other constructor.

the usage in assembly 2 would be something like this

public class NewFunctionalityClass : IClassB
{
    public void SomeMethod()
    {
       //something else
    }
}
public TestClass()
{
   public void ShowMethod()
   {
      var defaultObject = new ClassA();
      defaultObject.SomeMethod();  // default implementation

     var otherObject = new ClassA(new NewFunctionalityClass());
     otherObject.SomeMethod(); // here the new implementation will run
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how this helps. – Steven Sudit Aug 12 '10 at 15:04
    
so you can easily add new functionality in assembly2 – nWorx Aug 12 '10 at 15:40
    
i've added some code example for you it helps because you wont have to override or virtualize any methods anymore -> simpler – nWorx Aug 12 '10 at 15:47
    
Please see my comments to code4life for an explanation of why I don't see this as being a helpful answer. – Steven Sudit Aug 12 '10 at 16:18

Assuming that A calls an instance of ExtendedB that is referenced through a variable of type B, and the method is marked virtual in B and override in ExtendedB, the call should be polymorphic. It should work. Maybe you could show some code.

share|improve this answer

It's hard to tell without the actual code, but taking your diagram (by the way, love the ASCII art!) at face value, I would suggest that Class A have a reference to an interface rather than being hard-coded to Class B.

Like this:

// ----- this is in Assembly 1  -----------
public ClassA
{
    public MyInterface myDependentObject;
}

public interface MyInterface
{
    void OtherMethod();
}

public class ClassB : MyInterface
{
    public void OtherMethod()
    {
        // some code here...
    }
}


// ----- this is in Assembly 2  -----------
public class OtherB : MyInterface
{
    public void OtherMethod()
    {
        // some code here...
    }
}

In your Assembly 2, assign OtherB to ClassA:

// ----- this is in Assembly 2  -----------
OtherB b = new OtherB();
ClassA a = new ClassA { myDependentObject = b };

Now whenever ClassA executes the myDependentObject.OtherMethod(), it will pick up from assembly 2 rather than assembly 1 definitions.

HTH...

share|improve this answer
1  
Having a reference to a base class is not hard-coding. It should work just fine, so I see no reason to complicate this with interfaces, particularly when we don't yet know why it doesn't already work. – Steven Sudit Aug 12 '10 at 15:05
    
@Steven, the OP was asking for a design pattern or best practice approach. In that case, I'd still stick to using interfaces. Also I think it's pretty evident why it doesn't work - ClassA is establishing a hard dependency to ClassB somewhere in Assembly 1. Another words, we have a "separation of concerns" issue here. Interfaces is the best approach to handle these cases, because it loosens the dependency and allows for these to be resolved further down the process (i.e., in Assembly 2 per my example). – code4life Aug 12 '10 at 15:48
    
I thought the best practice is to use inheritance when you actually want inheritance, as we do here. But my deeper concern is that, from all that we have heard, inheritance with a virtual method should have led to polymorphism, yet it didn't. I'd like to understand why, before punting on inheritance and working around the problem. The problem described is not reproducible. – Steven Sudit Aug 12 '10 at 16:17
    
you shouldn't use that much inheritance.. composition over inheritance - interfaces are the best solution for this kind of problem - your way cannot work, because of the hard dependency like code4life already wrote – nWorx Aug 12 '10 at 16:24
1  
Further to my comment, the OP's design of the relationships between the classes need to be redefined. If you want classA to properly invoke either classB or extendedClassB, then defining this via interfaces is the best approach to take, IMO. – code4life Aug 13 '10 at 13:59

Can you provide some cut down code of the example? I appreciate the ascii art, but I suspect that the problem may be in how A gets the B that it works on. If its instantiating its own copy, then there's no way it can call the overridden method in the derived class.

That said, I also agree that the interface refactoring suggested by others is the way to go. Allow A to work from interface IB, so it must use a provided implementer of IB, rather than generate its own. That way it doesn't matter whether the object provided is a B, a subclass of B, or something else entirely. It also makes A, B, and Bs subclasses more testable, which is A Good Thing.

share|improve this answer
    
No, it's really not. Sometimes you want to inherit so that you can selectively override some methods and not others, and so that you can selectively chain to the base implementation as well. Interfaces are a good thing, but they are not a direct replacement for inheritance, nor does switching to them offer us any insight into why inheritance was not polymorphic. – Steven Sudit Aug 12 '10 at 17:33

It appears that you may need to use a stragey or a template pattern to solve this issue.

share|improve this answer

There are several design patterns that might work. Here is the list that came to my mind (in this order) while reading your post.

  1. ADAPTER
  2. DECORATOR
  3. TEMPLATE METHOD.
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't explain why the call apparently isn't being resolved virtually. Let's diagnose before prescribing. – Steven Sudit Aug 12 '10 at 14:21

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