Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a dynamic set of data X of the form:

----------------------------------
x.id | x.allocated | x.unallocated
----------------------------------
foo  | 2           | 0
bar  | 1           | 2
----------------------------------

And I need to get to a result of Y (order is unimportant):

----------------------------------
y.id | y.state
----------------------------------
foo  | allocated
foo  | allocated
bar  | allocated
bar  | unallocated
bar  | unallocated
----------------------------------

I have a UTF based solution, but I'm looking for hyper-efficiency so I'm idly wondering if there's a statement based, non-procedural way to get this kind of "ungroup by" effect?

It feels like an unpivot, but my brain can't get there right now.

share|improve this question
1  
Which SQL Server version? –  AakashM Aug 12 '10 at 15:34
    
2K5 fwiw (omg padding) –  annakata Aug 13 '10 at 9:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using Sql Server 2005, UNPIVOT, and CTE you can try something like

DECLARE @Table TABLE(
        id VARCHAR(20),
        allocated INT,
        unallocated INT
)

INSERT INTO @Table SELECT 'foo', 2, 0
INSERT INTO @Table SELECT 'bar', 1, 2

;WITH vals AS (
        SELECT  *
        FROM    
        (
            SELECT  id,
                    allocated,
                    unallocated
            FROM    @Table
        ) p
        UNPIVOT (Cnt FOR Action IN (allocated, unallocated)) unpvt
        WHERE   Cnt > 0
)
, Recurs AS (
        SELECT  id,
                Action,
                Cnt - 1 Cnt
        FROM    vals
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  id,
                Action,
                Cnt - 1 Cnt
        FROM    Recurs
        WHERE   Cnt > 0

)
SELECT  id,
        Action
FROM    Recurs
ORDER BY id, action
share|improve this answer
    
I knew it was unpivotable :) Thanks. –  annakata Aug 13 '10 at 9:00

If you have a numbers table in your database, you could use that to help get your results. In my database, I have a table named Numbers with a Num column.

Declare @Temp Table(id VarChar(10), Allocated Int, UnAllocated Int)

Insert Into @Temp Values('foo', 2, 0)
Insert Into @Temp Values('bar',1, 2)

Select T.id,'Allocated' 
From   @Temp T 
       Inner Join Numbers 
          On T.Allocated >= Numbers.Num
Union All
Select T.id,'Unallocated' 
From   @Temp T 
       Inner Join Numbers 
          On T.unAllocated >= Numbers.Num
share|improve this answer
    
Simple, elegant, but obviously breaks down at extreme number ranges unless you want to generate bigint.max rows in your table. Almost certainly the most efficient solution, but I dislike polluting my DB with support mechanisms. –  annakata Aug 13 '10 at 8:59
    
Polluting a DB with support mechanisms? Really? I think that's the definition of an index. Indexes exists to support your DB's querying performance. I bet you have a bunch of those in your database. –  G Mastros Aug 13 '10 at 12:48
    
@annakata - You're a real joker! Do you realize that the numbers in the OP's question are actually being translated into real rows in a real result set? Whatever the rowcount is going to be of the final result set, if the server and application can handle that, they can handle a numbers table to go along with it. Allowing for some unlikely colossal system, one table with 2^31-1 integer values in it is only about 8 Gb of data. Returning 2,147,483,647 rows is thus no problem, and I guarantee this solution will outperform your CTE by orders of magnitude. –  ErikE Aug 25 '10 at 23:40
    
@Emtucifor - Well you obviously didn't realise that I am the OP. I deeply object to creating independent structures in a domain which do not map to domain objects. This is the logical equivalent of static methods and helper classes imho, and I don't think the index comparison is relevant because indexes are not independant of their tables. –  annakata Aug 26 '10 at 6:57
    
@annakata - You're right. I missed that fact. Haha on me! You are of course entitled to your opinion. I just had to say my piece about why I thought it wasn't a well-founded one. In my perspective, satisfying theoretical idealism at the expense of simplicity and performance is, well, a mistake. I think of a numbers table as making up for a missing feature that ought to be in SQL Server: a function that returns a rowset of numbers within a certain range. This should be so easy for the engine to build and could be all in memory. In the meantime, it's a GREAT way for solving problems. –  ErikE Aug 26 '10 at 16:06

This answer is just to ping back to G Mastros and doesn't need any upvotes. I thought he would appreciate a performance boost to his already superior query.

SELECT
   T.id,
   CASE X.Which WHEN 1 THEN 'Allocated' ELSE 'Unallocated' END
FROM
   @Temp T 
   INNER JOIN Numbers N
      On N.Num <= CASE X.Which WHEN 1 THEN T.Allocated ELSE T.Unallocated END
   CROSS JOIN (SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 2) X (Which)
share|improve this answer
    
Is Numbers a system table/view? Is it available in SQL Server 2005? –  Viral Jain Jul 25 '13 at 6:51
1  
It's just a table with the numbers 1 to 100,000 or some high amount. –  ErikE Jul 25 '13 at 9:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.