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I have a picture that needs to be split into 4, and each part must have a link. Do people still use image hotspots?

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Just to clarify, by "hotspots" are you referring to HTML image maps? w3schools.com/tags/tag_map.asp –  Rob Hruska Aug 12 '10 at 19:24
    
Some of your users might be happier if you split the picture into four separate images, then use CSS positioning to reassemble them into one picture! Sorry not to make this an actual answer, but I was quite surprised to see someone named Rob Hruska on here! –  Greg Hluska Aug 12 '10 at 19:43
    
Hah, interesting. I haven't seen the surname "Hluska" before, but the similarity is intriguing :). –  Rob Hruska Aug 12 '10 at 19:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I am assuming you are talking about client side image maps.

They are still being used and are part of HTML 4.01 and XHTML 1.1, and also in the current HTML 5 draft.

They are simple to use and are supported by all browsers and as such are a good way to have "hot spots" on a single image. I can't think of a single better alternative (ease of use, browser support, accessibility, being part of the HTML spec) that will give you this functionality.

Whether having such "hot spots" on a single image is advisable (discoverability by the user being the main issue), is a different question.

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Using images as links is lame in my opinion; it can hurt accessibility, and depending on the image used, can result in Mystery Meat Navigation, which is lame.

Instead, I'd make that image a background image.

HTML

<div id="image-hotspot">
    <a href="#small-planets">Small Planets</a>
    <a href="#big-planets">Big Planets</a>
    <a href="#the-sun">The Sun</a>
</div>

CSS

#image-hotspot {
    background:url(http://onlyfunnyjokes.com/bestoftheweb/wp-uploads/earth_planets_size_comparison.jpg);
    height:650px;
    width:385px;
}
#image-hotspot a {
    display:block;
    text-indent:-10000px; /* you could also change the opacity instead*/
                          /* as a matter of fact I suggest using the opacity technique */
                          /* the text-indent has caused me troubles in the iPad browser */
    height:216px;
}

You might need to use more advanced CSS positioning to make sure those anchor elements <a> are where you need them to be.

Addendum

Here's another example which should seem more relevant:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en" >
<head>
    <title >Test</title>
    <style type="text/css">
    #image-hotspot {
        background:url(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c4/Planets2008.jpg);
        height:720px;
        width:1280px;
        position:relative;
        top:0px;
        left:0px;
    }
    #image-hotspot a#the-sun {
        display:block;
        text-indent:-10000px;
        height:720px;
        width:200px;
        position:absolute;
        left:0px;
        top:0px;
    }
    #image-hotspot a#mercury {
        display:block;
        text-indent:-10000px;
        height:25px;
        width:25px;
        position:absolute;
        left:225px;
        top:275px;
    }
    #image-hotspot a#venus {
        display:block;
        text-indent:-10000px;
        height:75px;
        width:40px;
        position:absolute;
        left:265px;
        top:250px;
    }
    #image-hotspot a#earth {
        display:block;
        text-indent:-10000px;
        height:75px;
        width:45px;
        position:absolute;
        left:325px;
        top:250px;
    }
    #image-hotspot a#mars {
        display:block;
        text-indent:-10000px;
        height:75px;
        width:45px;
        position:absolute;
        left:383px;
        top:250px;
    }
    #image-hotspot a#jupiter {
        display:block;
        text-indent:-10000px;
        height:125px;
        width:135px;
        position:absolute;
        left:450px;
        top:225px;
    }
    #image-hotspot a#saturn {
        display:block;
        text-indent:-10000px;
        height:125px;
        width:195px;
        position:absolute;
        left:610px;
        top:225px;
    }
    #image-hotspot a#uranus {
        display:block;
        text-indent:-10000px;
        height:75px;
        width:60px;
        position:absolute;
        left:805px;
        top:250px;
    }
    #image-hotspot a#neptune {
        display:block;
        text-indent:-10000px;
        height:75px;
        width:60px;
        position:absolute;
        left:887px;
        top:250px;
    }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="image-hotspot">
        <a id="the-sun" href="#the-sun">the sun</a>
        <a id="mercury" href="#mercury">mercury</a>
        <a id="venus" href="#venus">venus</a>
        <a id="earth" href="#earth">earth</a>
        <a id="mars" href="#mars">mars</a>
        <a id="jupiter" href="#jupiter">jupiter</a>
        <a id="saturn" href="#saturn">saturn</a>
        <a id="uranus" href="#uranus">uranus</a>
        <a id="neptune" href="#neptune">neptune</a>
        <!-- <a id="pluto" href="#pluto">pluto</a> -->
    </div>
</body>
</html>
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You can use image maps, the main reason people don't like them is because people often map a small part of an image and you don't know it's a link. If you can, just wrap the each image in it's respect <a href='link'>img</a>

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