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I have recently started php and was wondering the differences between __construct() and having a method with the same name as the class?

Is there a reason for using it? All I can work out is it overrides the method named Foo or is it down to which you prefer?

E.g.

class Foo {

    function Foo()
    {
       echo 'Foo stated<br>';
    }

    function __construct() {
       echo 'Construct started<br>';
    }
}

Thanks

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5 Answers 5

Using __construct() is the newer PHP5 more OOP focused method to call a constructor. Using a method with the same name as the class is the old deprecated way to do it, and it will not function as a constructor as of PHP 5.3.3 for namespaced classes.

From the constructors and destructors page:

For backwards compatibility, if PHP 5 cannot find a __construct() function for a given class, it will search for the old-style constructor function, by the name of the class. Effectively, it means that the only case that would have compatibility issues is if the class had a method named __construct() which was used for different semantics.

Unlike with other methods, PHP will not generate an E_STRICT level error message when __construct() is overridden with different parameters than the parent __construct() method has.

As of PHP 5.3.3, methods with the same name as the last element of a namespaced class name will no longer be treated as constructor. This change doesn't affect non-namespaced classes.

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"if PHP 5 cannot find a __construct() function for a given class, it will search for the old-style constructor function, by the name of the class. Effectively, it means that the only case that would have compatibility issues is if the class had a method named __construct() which was used for different semantics."

Source: http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.decon.php

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Foo() is a php4 way(deprecated), __construct() is php5 way. php will first look for __construct, then, if it's not found, it will use Foo

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Thanks you very much. –  Joe Aug 12 '10 at 20:27

Is there a reason for using it? All I can work out is it overrides the method named Foo or is it down to which you prefer?

The benefits of __construct() become clearer when you involve renaming and inheritance. If you rename a class, you then have to rename it's constructor. No big deal, but if class B inherits from class A you could end up with:

class B extends A {
    function B() {
        parent::A();
    }
}

It's much easier and more maintainable to do:

function __construct() {
    parent::__construct();
}

Now when you rename class A, you don't have to remember to also change the parent calls in all its children. Granted, there's still renaming to do in your code but at least this is not one of them.

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Having a method with the same name as the class, which is automatically called as a constructor is a throwback to PHP4, and is to be considered deprecated... in the latest development branch of PHP, it will be treated as a normal class method. __construct is the formally accepted constructor in PHP5, although in current releases it will fall back to the PHP4 method if __construct doesn't exist.

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