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Why does the following expression in SQL Server return -9223372036854775808 and not 123?

I am calling this from a stored proc where I can't pass null parameters

declare @t bigint;
set @t = -9223372036854775808;  --min value for bigint / long
select ISNULL(@t, 123)
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1  
well gosh_____. –  Mark Schultheiss Aug 12 '10 at 20:36
    
You really asked that question? –  StingyJack Aug 12 '10 at 20:45
3  
Play nice boys. Everyone who knows how to use the ISNULL() function had to learn it at some point. –  dave Aug 12 '10 at 20:57
    
@dave -- I agree with you that people should be nice. Although on the other hand, I would expect someone with 1881 reputation points to know how to look up and read the documentation for the function. I believe it is the first result returned by most search engines when searching for "ISNULL". –  Adam Porad Aug 12 '10 at 21:48
1  
If it's any consolation, see my question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1189810/… –  OMG Ponies Aug 13 '10 at 21:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Because:

IF @t IS NOT NULL
  PRINT @t
ELSE
  PRINT 123

Being negative doesn't mean the value is NULL. NULL is the lack of any value at all.

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@t is not null because you assigned it a value. If you want ISNULL() to return 123, remove the assignment.

declare @t bigint;
select ISNULL(@t, 123)
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The ISNULL(@t, 123) function returns 123 if @t is NULL, otherwise it returns @t. You may want to do something like this.

NULLIF(@t, -9223372036854775808)

This will return NULL if @t equals -9223372036854775808. NULLIF returns the first expression (@t) if the two expressions are not equal.

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2  
The ISNULL functin won't assign a 123 to @t if @t is NULL. The function ISNULL will return 123 if @t is NULL otherwise it returns the value of @t. The value of @t is unchanged. see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms184325.aspx –  Adam Porad Aug 12 '10 at 21:11
2  
your description of NULLIF is also incorrect. NULLIF returns the first expression if the two expressions are not equal. If the expressions are equal, NULLIF returns a null value of the type of the first expression. see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177562.aspx –  Adam Porad Aug 12 '10 at 21:12
    
Yep. You're right. I didn't explain them well. I will correct. Thanks @Adam. –  bobs Aug 12 '10 at 21:21

Because @t is not null.

What made you think that the most negative value for a bigint would be interpreted as null?

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Good point, I don't know why I thought so and it was an impulse reaction to ask it on SO. –  VoodooChild Aug 12 '10 at 21:46

You seem to be assuming that -9223372036854775808 IS NULL which is incorrect. ISNULL(@t, 123) would only return NULL if @t IS NULL but it's not null since it has the value of -9223372036854775808 which is non-NULL.

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ISNULL returns the first non-null value, they are both non-null (have value) so it returns the first one.

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To achieve what I think you want to achieve, try this:

declare @t bigint; 
set @t = -9223372036854775808;  --min value for bigint / long 
select ISNULL(NULLIF(@t, -9223372036854775808) , 123) 

or this:

declare @t bigint; 
set @t = -9223372036854775808;  --min value for bigint / long 
select case @t when -9223372036854775808 then 123 else @t end
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