Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In python OOP, lets say, Person is a parent class with its own constructor; then Student is a sub class of Person, before I use Student, must Person.__init__(self) be called first in the constructor of Student? Plus, can I define a new constructor in Student class?

class Person():      
    def __init__(self):  

Above is class Person with its constructor

class Student(Person):    
    def __init__(self):  
        Person.__init__(self)   
    def __init__(self, age)

What I mean is, could Student have its own constructor? If so, must Person.__init__(self) be called in the Student constructor in this case?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

Of course, Student can have its own constructor. However, a class can only have one constructor in Python, there's nothing like constructor overload.

So when we say a sub class has its own constructor, we really mean something like this:

class Worker(People):
    def __init__(self, company):
        self.company = company

As @IanH pointed out, you don't have to call the super class constructor. And when you think you should call it (probably for some common initialization), you can do it like this:

class People:
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name

class Student(People):
    def __init__(self, name, school):
        super(Student, self).__init__(name)
        self.school = school
share|improve this answer
    
that could be brilliant, my concern is the so called "constructor overload", now i am on my way –  ladyfafa Aug 13 '10 at 2:32
    
This is the right way to do it, but learn more about what super() really does here: fuhm.net/super-harmful . It's a good read in a more general sense also, as the point of using **kwargs and keyword parameters is useful in many situations. –  clacke Aug 13 '10 at 8:58
    
Thanks for sharing the link. But if I understood this essay correctly, it is evil only when you try to use multi-inheritance, right? So I think it is multi-inheritance that's harmful :) –  satoru Aug 13 '10 at 9:01

It doesn't have to be, no, but it really should. If the base class has any methods or properties which aren't overridden in the derived class then the base class should be initialized properly, otherwise those methods and properties may not work.

EDIT: let me clarify. You can define a constructor for Student, but that constructor really should call Person.__init__ to make sure the base class is initialized properly.

share|improve this answer

Student can have a own constructor. In python you may or may not call the base class constructor, but it is good practice to do so.

share|improve this answer
    
@lanH thanks !! –  ladyfafa Aug 13 '10 at 2:32

No it would look like this:

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self, name, age, height, weight):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.height = height
        self.weigth = weight


class Student(Person):
    def __init__(self, name, age, height, weight, school):
        Person.__init__(self, name, age, heigth, weight)
        self.school = school

If you didn't have Person.__init__ in the Student class, you would have to do all the things you do in the Person class in the Student class if you wanted to be able to use it like a person.

share|improve this answer
    
I see now, thank you :) –  ladyfafa Aug 12 '10 at 23:54
    
@sth, btw, may I know how to edit the code into a nice format when I tried to post any piece of code here? Your code looks nice –  ladyfafa Aug 12 '10 at 23:56
    
ladyfafa: Just indent the code lines by 4 spaces (+ the spaces for the python code) and Stackoverflow will colorize it automagically. –  IanH Aug 12 '10 at 23:58
    
@lanH, thanks ~~ –  ladyfafa Aug 13 '10 at 0:03
    
@ladyfafa: For code blocks indent all the lines with for spaces, for example by selecting the code and clicking the 101010-button in the editor (Or using the Ctrl-K keyboard shortcut). For inline code use backticks, or that same button/shortcut. For more see stackoverflow.com/editing-help or the explanations shown to the right of the edit window. –  sth Aug 13 '10 at 0:04

Adapted from Zimm3r's answer, but using super for maximum correctness:

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self, name, age, height, weight):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.height = height
        self.weigth = weight


class Student(Person):
    def __init__(self, name, age, height, weight, school):
        super(Student, self).__init__(name, age, heigth, weight)
        self.school = school
share|improve this answer
    
super works fine, just like java –  ladyfafa Aug 13 '10 at 2:31

You can overload Python's __new__ it goes before __init__, that what you was looking in your original question.

def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):pass
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.