Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm very new to programming and I must be missing something here. The first section works. The second section blows up with an error. Why is that?

// this works
private static int[] test2 = {1,2,3};

// this is ok
private static int[] test1 = new int[3];
// these three lines do not work
// tooltip states ... "cannot find symbol.  class test1. ']' expected."
test1[0] = 1;
test1[1] = 2;
test1[2] = 3;
share|improve this question
    
this should work, you might want to post full code –  Nikita Rybak Aug 13 '10 at 4:04
    
can you please post your whole java file? it's hard to work out the scope of what you've pasted based on your current question. –  Catchwa Aug 13 '10 at 4:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From what you've posted, the lines

test1[0] = 1;
test1[1] = 2;
test1[2] = 3;

need to be inside a method or constructor. Looks like you have them outside at the class level. Lets say MyClass is the name of your class. Add a constructor and put the three statements inside it:

MyClass {
    test1[0] = 1;
    test1[1] = 2;
    test1[2] = 3;
}

Edit: You can only declare variables directly inside the class. A declaration statement can, however, also include initialization (on the same line):

int[] arrayA; // declare an array of integers
int[] arrayB = new int[5]; // declare and create an array of integers
int[] arrayC = {1, 2, 3}; // declare, create and initialize an array of integers

The following, on the other hand, is not a declaration and involves only initialization:

arrayB[0] = 1;

and so it can't go directly under the class. It must be enclosed within a method, constructor or initialization block.

See Also:

Arrays Java tutorial at Oracle

share|improve this answer
    
Good guess. I haven't thought he might actually put initialization right after definition. –  Nikita Rybak Aug 13 '10 at 4:13
    
That's what I did - had them at the class level vs. in the constructor. I guess I was just wondering why the first way of initialization (int[] var = {x,y,z}) works at the class level and the other way doesn't. Mind boggling. –  ConfusedWithJava Aug 13 '10 at 4:21
    
@ConfusedWithJava - see my edit above –  Samit G. Aug 13 '10 at 4:38

To work your java source file must be something like this:

public class Test
{
    // this works
    private static int[] test2 = {1,2,3};

    // this is ok
    private static int[] test1 = new int[3];

    public static void main( String args[] ){

        test1[0] = 1;
        test1[1] = 2;
        test1[2] = 3;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can also put the code in a static initialization block which is executed when the class is loaded.

public class Test {
   // this works
   private static int[] test2 = {1,2,3};

   // this is ok
   private static int[] test1 = new int[3];

   static {
       test1[0] = 1;
       test1[1] = 2;
       test1[2] = 3;
   }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.