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How can the first letter in a text be set to capital?

Example:

it is a text.  = It is a text.
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2  
Can the string be something like "99c waffles" and you want to get "99c Waffles"? That is, what is your definition of "first letter"? –  polygenelubricants Aug 13 '10 at 6:09
    
possible duplicate of Make first letter of a string upper case –  Jeroen Jan 24 at 10:36

10 Answers 10

up vote 33 down vote accepted
public static string ToUpperFirstLetter(this string source)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(source))
        return string.Empty;
    // convert to char array of the string
    char[] letters = source.ToCharArray();
    // upper case the first char
    letters[0] = char.ToUpper(letters[0]);
    // return the array made of the new char array
    return new string(letters);
}
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2  
You don't need to do the source.ToCharArray(). A string is already a char array and can be indexed with just source[0]. –  Alastair Pitts Aug 13 '10 at 6:04
5  
@Alastair, strings are immutable but char arrays aren't. –  Jacob Aug 13 '10 at 6:11
    
@Jacob, Oooh yeah. Shows how dead my brain is on a Friday afternoon :/ –  Alastair Pitts Aug 13 '10 at 6:18
    
Can I suggest you to write if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(source)) return source; instead of string.Empty? :D –  Yves M. Oct 3 '13 at 14:18
    
And also renaming the method from ToUpperFirstLetter to ToUpperFirstCharacter which is a more relevant name :) –  Yves M. Oct 3 '13 at 14:22

It'll be something like this:

// precondition: before must not be an empty string

String after = before.Substring(0, 1).ToUpper() + before.Substring(1);
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Why so many guys like Substring? It has a bad performance. –  Danny Chen Aug 13 '10 at 6:45
    
@Danny: let's discuss your comment here stackoverflow.com/questions/3474578/… –  polygenelubricants Aug 13 '10 at 6:55
2  
.NET is also slow. C++ or assembler is much faster. Does that mean we need to drop .NET and move to faster languages? –  FractalizeR Aug 13 '10 at 7:06
9  
@Danny: Substring makes the code simple. I prefer to write simple code first, and then optimize with more complicated code only where necessary. –  Jon Skeet Aug 13 '10 at 7:44

If you are using C# then try this code:

Microsoft.VisualBasic.StrConv(sourceString, Microsoft.VisualBasic.vbProperCase)
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1  
This is ugly. If your using C#, why would you be importing/referencing the Visual Basic DLL? –  Alastair Pitts Aug 13 '10 at 6:11
    
Read tag C#. NOT Means VB –  Steven Spielberg Aug 13 '10 at 6:28
3  
@steven: You can use VB libraries from C#. –  Jon Skeet Aug 13 '10 at 7:44
5  
I didn't know steven spielberg was a programmer... –  Blankasaurus Sep 23 '10 at 21:06
text = new String(
    new [] { char.ToUpper(text.First()) }
    .Concat(text.Skip(1))
    .ToArray()
);
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This feels like a somewhat gratuitous use of LINQ to me... –  Jon Skeet Aug 13 '10 at 6:27
    
@Jon Skeet - That was entirely my intent :) I was actually wondering what the performance would be compared to the substring method above. –  arootbeer Aug 13 '10 at 6:40

polygenelubricants' answer is fine for most cases, but you potentially need to think about cultural issues. Do you want this capitalized in a culture-invariant way, in the current culture, or a specific culture? It can make a big difference in Turkey, for example. So you may want to consider:

CultureInfo culture = ...;
text = char.ToUpper(text[0], culture) + text.Substring(1);

or if you prefer methods on String:

CultureInfo culture = ...;
text = text.Substring(0, 1).ToUpper(culture) + text.Substring(1);

where culture might be CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, or the current culture etc.

For more on this problem, see the Turkey Test.

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Consider about different CultrueInfos, as well as TextInfos. –  Danny Chen Aug 13 '10 at 6:39
    
tell me the most case when we need to import Microsoft.VisualBasic dll when we work on C#.net –  Steven Spielberg Aug 13 '10 at 8:55

I realize this is an old post, but I recently had this problem and solved it with the following method.

    private string capSentences(string str)
    {
        string s = "";

        if (str[str.Length - 1] == '.')
            str = str.Remove(str.Length - 1, 1);

        char[] delim = { '.' };

        string[] tokens = str.Split(delim);

        for (int i = 0; i < tokens.Length; i++)
        {
            tokens[i] = tokens[i].Trim();

            tokens[i] = char.ToUpper(tokens[i][0]) + tokens[i].Substring(1);

            s += tokens[i] + ". ";
        } 

        return s;
    }

In the sample below clicking on the button executes this simple code outBox.Text = capSentences(inBox.Text.Trim()); which pulls the text from the upper box and puts it in the lower box after the above method runs on it.

Sample Program

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static String UppercaseWords(String BadName) { String FullName = "";

        if (BadName != null)
        {
            String[] FullBadName = BadName.Split(' ');
            foreach (string Name in FullBadName)
            {
                String SmallName = "";
                if (Name.Length > 1)
                {
                    SmallName = char.ToUpper(Name[0]) + Name.Substring(1).ToLower();
                }
                else
                {
                    SmallName = Name.ToUpper();
                }
                FullName = FullName + " " + SmallName;
            }

        }
        FullName = FullName.Trim();
        FullName = FullName.TrimEnd();
        FullName = FullName.TrimStart();
        return FullName;
    }
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can you fix your code formatting? –  Fiver Nov 24 '13 at 14:04

Try this code snippet:

char nm[] = "this is a test";

if(char.IsLower(nm[0]))  nm[0] = char.ToUpper(nm[0]);

//print result: This is a test
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char[] nm = "this is a test".ToCharArray(); will work –  Wim Ombelets Jan 10 at 9:56

I use this variant.

str.First().ToString().ToUpper() + str.Remove(0,1);

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this functions makes capital the first letter of all words in a string

public static string FormatSentence(string source)
    {
        var words = source.Split(' ').Select(t => t.ToCharArray()).ToList();
        words.ForEach(t =>
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < t.Length; i++)
            {
                t[i] = i.Equals(0) ? char.ToUpper(t[i]) : char.ToLower(t[i]);
            }
        });
        return string.Join(" ", words.Select(t => new string(t)));;
    }
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