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I want to clear a element from a vector using the erase method. But the problem here is that the element is not guaranteed to occur only once in the vector. It may be present multiple times and I need to clear all of them. My code is something like this:

void erase(std::vector<int>& myNumbers_in, int number_in)
    {
        std::vector<int>::iterator iter = myNumbers_in.begin();
        std::vector<int>::iterator endIter = myNumbers_in.end();
        for(; iter != endIter; ++iter)
        {
        	if(*iter == number_in)
        	{
        		myNumbers_in.erase(iter);
        	}
        }

    }


    int main(int argc, char* argv[])
    {
        std::vector<int> myNmbers;
        for(int i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
        {
        	myNmbers.push_back(i);
        	myNmbers.push_back(i);
        }

        erase(myNmbers, 1);


        return 0;
    }

This code obviously crashes because I am changing the end of the vector while iterating through it. What is the best way to achieve this ? i.e. is there any way to do this without iterating through the vector multiple times or creating one more copy of the vector?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 69 down vote accepted

Use the remove/erase idiom:

std::vector<int>& vec = myNumbers; // use shorter name
vec.erase(std::remove(vec.begin(), vec.end(), number_in), vec.end());

What happens is that remove compacts the elements that differ from the value to be removed (number_in) in the beginning of the vector and returns the iterator to the first element after that range. Then erase removes these elements (who's value is unspecified).

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1  
std::remove() shifts elements such that the elements to remove are overwritten. The algorithm doesn't change the size of the container, and if n elements are removed then it is undefined what are the last n elements. –  wilhelmtell Feb 14 '11 at 15:51
12  
erase-remove idiom is described in Item 32 in the book "Effective STL: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your Use of the Standard Template Library" by Scott Meyers. –  uvts_cvs Jun 1 '11 at 18:47
    
How might I update this to remove a custom object, rather than a primitive? I'd like to delete something while iterating through a vector<Cluster>. –  Benjin Jan 8 '13 at 1:43
1  
@Benjin no update is needed, it will call the objects' destructors if they exist. –  Motti Jan 8 '13 at 17:51
7  
STL 'idioms' like this make me use Python for small projects. –  Johannes Overmann Jun 25 '13 at 15:28
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Calling erase will invalidate iterators, you could use:

void erase(std::vector<int>& myNumbers_in, int number_in)
{
    std::vector<int>::iterator iter = myNumbers_in.begin();
    while (iter != myNumbers_in.end())
    {
        if (*iter == number_in)
        {
            iter = myNumbers_in.erase(iter);
        }
        else
        {
           ++iter;
        }
    }

}

Or you could use std::remove_if together with a functor and std::vector::erase:

struct Eraser
{
    Eraser(int number_in) : number_in(number_in) {}
    int number_in;
    bool operator()(int i) const
    {
        return i == number_in;
    }
};

std::vector<int> myNumbers;
myNumbers.erase(std::remove_if(myNumbers.begin(), myNumbers.end(), Eraser(number_in)), myNumbers.end());

Instead of writing your own functor in this case you could use std::remove:

std::vector<int> myNumbers;
myNumbers.erase(std::remove(myNumbers.begin(), myNumbers.end(), number_in), myNumbers.end());
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Why use your own functor when you can use equal_to? :-P sgi.com/tech/stl/equal_to.html –  Chris Jester-Young Dec 7 '08 at 10:24
    
By the way, calling erase with remove is the canonical way to do this. –  Konrad Rudolph Dec 7 '08 at 10:42
    
i thinkhe does exactly that. but he should use remove_if if using an own functor iirc. or just use remove without the functor –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 7 '08 at 13:17
    
+1 The spelled-out code just helped me in a programming competition, while "just use the remove-erase idiom" didn't. –  user529758 Nov 10 '13 at 18:42
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  1. You can iterate using the index access,
  2. To avoid O(n^2) complexity you can use two indices, i - current testing index, j - index to store next item and at the end of the cycle new size of the vector.

void erase(std::vector<int>& v, int num)
{
  size_t j = 0;
  for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i) {
    if (v[i] != num) v[j++] = v[i];
  }
  // trim vector to new size
  v.resize(j);
}

In such case you have no invalidating of iterators, complexity is O(n), and code is very concise and you don't need to write some helper classes, although in some case using helper classes can benefit in more flexible code.

This code does not use erase method, but solves your task.

Using pure stl you can do this in the following way (this is similar to the Motti's answer):

#include <algorithm>

void erase(std::vector<int>& v, int num) {
    vector<int>::iterator it = remove(v.begin(), v.end(), num);
    v.erase(it, v.end());
}
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Depending on why you are doing this, using a std::set might be a better idea than std::vector.

It allows each element to occur only once. If you add it multiple times, there will only be one instance to erase anyway. This will make the erase operation trivial. The erase operation will also have lower time complexity than on the vector, however, adding elements is slower on the set so it might not be much of an advantage.

This of course won't work if you are interested in how many times an element has been added to your vector or the order the elements were added.

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You could start from the end or update the end when an element is erased.

It would look something like this:

void erase(std::vector<int>& myNumbers_in, int number_in)
    {
        std::vector<int>::iterator iter = myNumbers_in.begin();
        std::vector<int>::iterator endIter = myNumbers_in.end();
        for(; iter != endIter; ++iter)
        {
                if(*iter == number_in)
                {
                        myNumbers_in.erase(iter);
                        endIter = myNumbers_in.end();
                }
        }

    }
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I tried the above piece of code. It worked for my initial case, but when I created a vector with 0,0,0,1 as the values and tried to erase 0 it didn't work properly. After exiting the loop I found that the size of the vector is 2 instead of 1. –  Naveen Dec 7 '08 at 10:29
1  
This is worst-case O(N^2). O(N) algorithms exist. You can do better. Also, erase(iter) followed by ++iter may, depending on the STL vector<> implementation, skip the following entry. Consider "erase v[i=2]; i++;" -- you never check the original i=3 (now i=2) entry in v[]. –  Mr.Ree Dec 8 '08 at 4:40
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