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I've read a number of posts here about NSManagedObjectContext and multi-threaded applications. I've also gone over the CoreDataBooks example to understand how separate threads require their own NSManagedObjectContext, and how a save operation gets merged with the main NSManagedObjectContext. I found the example to be good, but also too application specific. I'm trying to generalize this, and wonder if my approach is sound.

My approach is to have a generic function for fetching the NSManagedObjectContext for the current thread. The function returns the NSManagedObjectContext for the main thread, but will create a new one (or fetch it from a cache) if called from within a different thread. That goes as follows:

+(NSManagedObjectContext *)managedObjectContext {
    MyAppDelegate *delegate = (MyAppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];
    NSManagedObjectContext *moc = delegate.managedObjectContext;

    NSThread *thread = [NSThread currentThread];

    if ([thread isMainThread]) {
        return moc;
    }

    // a key to cache the context for the given thread
    NSString *threadKey = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%p", thread];

    // delegate.managedObjectContexts is a mutable dictionary in the app delegate
    NSMutableDictionary *managedObjectContexts = delegate.managedObjectContexts;

    if ( [managedObjectContexts objectForKey:threadKey] == nil ) {
        // create a context for this thread
        NSManagedObjectContext *threadContext = [[[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] init] autorelease];
        [threadContext setPersistentStoreCoordinator:[moc persistentStoreCoordinator]];
        // cache the context for this thread
        [managedObjectContexts setObject:threadContext forKey:threadKey];
    }

    return [managedObjectContexts objectForKey:threadKey];
}

Save operations are simple if called from the main thread. Save operations called from other threads require merging within the main thread. For that I have a generic commit function:

+(void)commit {
    // get the moc for this thread
    NSManagedObjectContext *moc = [self managedObjectContext];

    NSThread *thread = [NSThread currentThread];

    if ([thread isMainThread] == NO) {
        // only observe notifications other than the main thread
        [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self
                                             selector:@selector(contextDidSave:)
                                                 name:NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification
                                               object:moc];
    }

    NSError *error;
    if (![moc save:&error]) {
        // fail
    }

    if ([thread isMainThread] == NO) {
        [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:self 
                                                    name:NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification 
                                                  object:moc];
    }
}

In the contextDidSave: function we perform the merge, if called by the notification in commit.

+(void)contextDidSave:(NSNotification*)saveNotification {
    MyAppDelegate *delegate = (MyAppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];
    NSManagedObjectContext *moc = delegate.managedObjectContext;

    [moc performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(mergeChangesFromContextDidSaveNotification:)
                      withObject:saveNotification
                   waitUntilDone:YES];
}

Finally, we clean-up the cache of NSManagedObjectContext with this:

+(void)initialize {
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self 
                                             selector:@selector(threadExit) 
                                                 name:NSThreadWillExitNotification 
                                               object:nil]; 
}

+(void)threadExit {
    MyAppDelegate *delegate = (MyAppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];
    NSString *threadKey = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%p", [NSThread currentThread]];  
    NSMutableDictionary *managedObjectContexts = delegate.managedObjectContexts;    

    [managedObjectContexts removeObjectForKey:threadKey];
}

This compiles and seems to work, but I know threading problems can be tricky due to race conditions. Does anybody see a problem with this approach?

Also, I'm using this from within the context of an asynchronous request (using ASIHTTPRequest), which fetches some data from a server and updates and inserts the store on the iPhone. It seems NSThreadWillExitNotification doesn't fire after the request completes, and the same thread is then used for subsequent requests. This means the same NSManagedObjectContext is used for separate requests on the same thread. Is this a problem?

share|improve this question
    
chris, i am facing a similar multi threading issue while using a single NSManagedObjectContext created in main thread for all the operations in NSoperation Queue. The probkem comes when each thread tries to save the context, the app crashes randomly throwing an exception from core data . i was thinking to lock this context while using in all the operations, so that each of them will have an exclusive access of the context . i have read ur above solution.sounds gud , couls u please paste me the new code which u have used for merging the context and also please comment on using a lock for playin –  user753884 May 14 '11 at 18:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A year after posting this question I finally built a framework to generalize and simplify my working with Core Data. It goes beyond the original question, and adds a number of features to make Core Data interactions much easier. Details here: https://github.com/chriscdn/RHManagedObject

share|improve this answer

Look at the saving and merging context in this article: http://www.cimgf.com/2011/08/22/importing-and-displaying-large-data-sets-in-core-data/. I think it's better then yours

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the link. I certainly think the handling of the save operation is better there (which I'll adopt), but I still wonder if the function I wrote for fetching a unique managedObjectContext per thread is a good way of doing this. –  chris Aug 13 '10 at 13:07
2  
The recommendation is to create the context on the thread that is going to use it so a cache is unlikely to work. I have experienced negative situations when I create a context on one and then only use it on another. –  Marcus S. Zarra Aug 13 '10 at 15:09
1  
I realize this question has aged, but I've recently come back to the topic by writing a framework that handles these common threading issues for me. The caching approach seems to work since the cache key is based on the current thread. That is, fetching a moc with this framework will always get me the moc for that thread. If the moc doesn't exist, then it's created, cached, and discarded after the changes are saved. I'd be happy to share the code if you're interested. –  chris Mar 4 '11 at 12:10
    
Link is broken... –  PsychoDad Jul 7 '11 at 22:29
    
@JJC I have updated link. –  jamapag Aug 22 '11 at 21:55

I found a solution after finally understanding the problem better. My solution doesn't directly address the question above, but does address the problem of why I had to deal with threads in the first place.

My application uses the ASIHTTPRequest library for asynchronous requests. I fetch some data from the server, and use the delegate requestFinished function to add/modify/delete my core-data objects. The requestFinished function was running in a different thread, and I assumed this was a natural side-effect of asynchronous requests.

After digging deeper I found that ASIHTTPRequest deliberately runs the request in a separate thread, but can be overridden in my subclass of ASIHTTPRequest:

+(NSThread *)threadForRequest:(ASIHTTPRequest *)request {
    return [NSThread mainThread];
}

This small change puts requestFinished in the main thread, which has eliminated my need to care about threads in my application.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not quite sure I've understood. ASIHTTPRequest does use a seperate thread (actually an NSOperationQueue) for asyncronous requests, but equally it always runs requestFinished on the mainthread. (In the latest code, this functionality is in the callSelectorOnMainThread method.) That said I can't see any disadvantage to your solution. –  JosephH Aug 16 '10 at 13:07
    
I found that requestFinished didn't run on the main thread until I added those three lines above. Is it possible this has changed with ASIHTTPRequest? I'm using v1.7. –  chris Aug 17 '10 at 10:40
    
You are correct. The ASIHTTPRequest delegate is run on the main thread, but I was implementing a subclass of ASIHTTPRequest and putting my code in the requestFinished: method. This doesn't necessarily get called on the main thread. thanks –  chris Mar 4 '11 at 12:14

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