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I have written the following function to calculate a check digit in R.

verhoeffCheck <- function(x)
{
## calculates check digit based on Verhoeff algorithm
## note that due to the way strsplit works, to call for vector x, use sapply(x,verhoeffCheck)

## check for string since leading zeros with numbers will be lost
if (class(x)!="character"){stop("Must enter a string")}

#split and convert to numbers
digs <- strsplit(x,"")[[1]]
digs <- as.numeric(digs)

digs <- rev(digs)   ## right to left algorithm

## tables required for D_5 group

d5_mult <- matrix(c(
                 0:9,
                 c(1:4,0,6:9,5),
                 c(2:4,0:1,7:9,5:6),
                 c(3:4,0:2,8:9,5:7),
                 c(4,0:3,9,5:8),
                 c(5,9:6,0,4:1),
                 c(6:5,9:7,1:0,4:2),
                 c(7:5,9:8,2:0,4:3),
                 c(8:5,9,3:0,4),
                 9:0
                 ),10,10,byrow=T)

d5_perm <- matrix(c(
                 0:9,
                 c(1,5,7,6,2,8,3,0,9,4),
                 c(5,8,0,3,7,9,6,1,4,2),
                 c(8,9,1,6,0,4,3,5,2,7),
                 c(9,4,5,3,1,2,6,8,7,0),
                 c(4,2,8,6,5,7,3,9,0,1),
                 c(2,7,9,3,8,0,6,4,1,5),
                 c(7,0,4,6,9,1,3,2,5,8)
                 ),8,10,byrow=T)

d5_inv <- c(0,4:1,5:9)

## apply algoritm - note 1-based indexing in R
d <- 0

for (i in 1:length(digs)){
    d <- d5_mult[d+1,(d5_perm[(i%%8)+1,digs[i]+1])+1]
    }

d5_inv[d+1]
}

In order to run on a vector of strings, sapply must be used. This is in part because of the use of strsplit, which returns a list of vectors. This does impact on the performance even for only moderately sized inputs.

How could this function be vectorized?

I am also aware that some performance is lost in having to create the tables in each iteration. Would storing these in a new environment be a better solution?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your input strings can contain different numbers of characters, then I don't see any way round lapply calls (or a plyr equivalent). The trick is to move them inside the function, so verhoeffCheck can accept vector inputs. This way you only need to create the matrices once.

verhoeffCheckNew <- function(x)
{
## calculates check digit based on Verhoeff algorithm

## check for string since leading zeros with numbers will be lost
  if (!is.character(x)) stop("Must enter a string")

  #split and convert to numbers
  digs <- strsplit(x, "")
  digs <- lapply(digs, function(x) rev(as.numeric(x)))

  ## tables required for D_5 group
  d5_mult <- matrix(c(
                   0:9,
                   c(1:4,0,6:9,5),
                   c(2:4,0:1,7:9,5:6),
                   c(3:4,0:2,8:9,5:7),
                   c(4,0:3,9,5:8),
                   c(5,9:6,0,4:1),
                   c(6:5,9:7,1:0,4:2),
                   c(7:5,9:8,2:0,4:3),
                   c(8:5,9,3:0,4),
                   9:0
                   ),10,10,byrow=T)

  d5_perm <- matrix(c(
                   0:9,
                   c(1,5,7,6,2,8,3,0,9,4),
                   c(5,8,0,3,7,9,6,1,4,2),
                   c(8,9,1,6,0,4,3,5,2,7),
                   c(9,4,5,3,1,2,6,8,7,0),
                   c(4,2,8,6,5,7,3,9,0,1),
                   c(2,7,9,3,8,0,6,4,1,5),
                   c(7,0,4,6,9,1,3,2,5,8)
                   ),8,10,byrow=T)

  d5_inv <- c(0,4:1,5:9)

  ## apply algorithm - note 1-based indexing in R      
  sapply(digs, function(x)
  {
    d <- 0  
    for (i in 1:length(x)){
        d <- d5_mult[d + 1, (d5_perm[(i %% 8) + 1, x[i] + 1]) + 1]
        }  
    d5_inv[d+1]
  })
}

Since d depends on what it was previously, the is no easy way to vectorise the for loop.

My version runs in about half the time for 1e5 strings.

rand_string <- function(n = 12) 
{
  paste(sample(as.character(0:9), sample(n), replace = TRUE), collapse = "")
}
big_test <- replicate(1e5, rand_string())

tic()
res1 <- unname(sapply(big_test, verhoeffCheck))
toc()

tic()
res2 <- verhoeffCheckNew(big_test)
toc()

identical(res1, res2) #hopefully TRUE!

See this question for tic and toc.

Further thoughts:

You may want additional input checking for "" and other strings that return NA when converted in numeric.

Since you are dealing exclusively with integers, you may get a slight performance benefit from using them rather than doubles. (Use as.integer rather than as.numeric and append L to the values in your matrices.)

share|improve this answer
    
Very Nice! I am finding a similar speedup. Wrapping the final lapply in an as.numeric ensures that a vector is returned rather than a list. –  James Aug 13 '10 at 14:23
1  
@James: Using sapply rather than lapply will do this for you (without needing as.numeric). –  Richie Cotton Aug 13 '10 at 16:15

We begin by defining the lookup matrices. I've laid them out in a way that should make them easier to check against a reference, e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verhoeff_algorithm.

d5_mult <- matrix(as.integer(c(
  0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
  1, 2, 3, 4, 0, 6, 7, 8, 9, 5,
  2, 3, 4, 0, 1, 7, 8, 9, 5, 6,
  3, 4, 0, 1, 2, 8, 9, 5, 6, 7,
  4, 0, 1, 2, 3, 9, 5, 6, 7, 8,
  5, 9, 8, 7, 6, 0, 4, 3, 2, 1,
  6, 5, 9, 8, 7, 1, 0, 4, 3, 2,
  7, 6, 5, 9, 8, 2, 1, 0, 4, 3,
  8, 7, 6, 5, 9, 3, 2, 1, 0, 4,
  9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0
)), ncol = 10, byrow = TRUE)

d5_perm <- matrix(as.integer(c(
  0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
  1, 5, 7, 6, 2, 8, 3, 0, 9, 4,
  5, 8, 0, 3, 7, 9, 6, 1, 4, 2,
  8, 9, 1, 6, 0, 4, 3, 5, 2, 7,
  9, 4, 5, 3, 1, 2, 6, 8, 7, 0,
  4, 2, 8, 6, 5, 7, 3, 9, 0, 1,
  2, 7, 9, 3, 8, 0, 6, 4, 1, 5,
  7, 0, 4, 6, 9, 1, 3, 2, 5, 8
)), ncol = 10, byrow = TRUE)

d5_inv <- as.integer(c(0, 4, 3, 2, 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9))

Next, we'll define the check function, and try it out with a test input. I've followed the derivation in wikipedia as closely as possible.

p <- function(i, n_i) {
  d5_perm[(i %% 8) + 1, n_i + 1] + 1
}
d <- function(c, p) {
  d5_mult[c + 1, p]
}

verhoeff <- function(x) {
  #split and convert to numbers
  digs <- strsplit(as.character(x), "")[[1]]
  digs <- as.numeric(digs)
  digs <- rev(digs)   ## right to left algorithm

  ## apply algoritm - note 1-based indexing in R
  c <- 0
  for (i in 1:length(digs)) {
    c <- d(c, p(i, digs[i]))
  }

  d5_inv[c + 1]
}
verhoeff(142857)

## [1] 0

This function is fundamentally iterative, as each iteration depends on the value of the previous. This means that we're unlikely to be able to vectorise in R, so if we want to vectorise, we'll need to use Rcpp.

However, before we turn to that, it's worth exploring if we can do the initial split faster. First we do a little microbenchmark to see if it's worth bothering:

library(microbenchmark)
digits <- function(x) {
  digs <- strsplit(as.character(x), "")[[1]]
  digs <- as.numeric(digs)
  rev(digs)
}

microbenchmark(
  digits(142857),
  verhoeff(142857)
)

## Unit: microseconds
##              expr   min    lq median    uq   max neval
##    digits(142857) 11.30 12.01  12.43 12.85 28.79   100
##  verhoeff(142857) 32.24 33.81  34.66 35.47 95.85   100

It looks like it! On my computer, verhoeff_prepare() accounts for about 50% of the run time. A little searching on stackoverflow reveals another approach to turning a number into digits:

digits2 <- function(x) {
   n <- floor(log10(x))
   x %/% 10^(0:n) %% 10
}
digits2(12345)

## [1] 5 4 3 2 1

microbenchmark(
  digits(142857),
  digits2(142857)
)

## Unit: microseconds
##             expr    min     lq median     uq   max neval
##   digits(142857) 11.495 12.102 12.468 12.834 79.60   100
##  digits2(142857)  2.322  2.784  3.358  3.561 13.69   100

digits2() is a lot faster than digits() but it has limited impact on the whole runtime.

verhoeff2 <- function(x) {
  digs <- digits2(x)

  c <- 0
  for (i in 1:length(digs)) {
    c <- d(c, p(i, digs[i]))
  }

  d5_inv[c + 1]
}
verhoeff2(142857)

## [1] 0

microbenchmark(
  verhoeff(142857),
  verhoeff2(142857)
)

## Unit: microseconds
##               expr   min    lq median    uq   max neval
##   verhoeff(142857) 33.06 34.49  35.19 35.92 73.38   100
##  verhoeff2(142857) 20.98 22.58  24.05 25.28 48.69   100

To make it even faster we could try C++.

#include <Rcpp.h>
using namespace Rcpp;

// [[Rcpp::export]]
int verhoeff3_c(IntegerVector digits, IntegerMatrix mult, IntegerMatrix perm,
                IntegerVector inv) {
  int n = digits.size();
  int c = 0;

  for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    int p = perm(i % 8, digits[i]);
    c = mult(c, p);
  }

  return inv[c];
}

verhoeff3 <- function(x) {
  verhoeff3_c(digits(x), d5_mult, d5_perm, d5_inv)
}
verhoeff3(142857)

## [1] 3

microbenchmark(
  verhoeff2(142857),
  verhoeff3(142857)
)

## Unit: microseconds
##               expr   min    lq median    uq   max neval
##  verhoeff2(142857) 21.00 22.85  25.53 27.11 63.71   100
##  verhoeff3(142857) 16.75 17.99  18.87 19.64 79.54   100

That doesn't yield much of an improvement. Maybe we can do better if we pass the number to C++ and process the digits in a loop:

#include <Rcpp.h>
using namespace Rcpp;

// [[Rcpp::export]]
int verhoeff4_c(int number, IntegerMatrix mult, IntegerMatrix perm,
                IntegerVector inv) {
  int c = 0;
  int i = 0;

  for (int i = 0; number > 0; ++i, number /= 10) {
    int p = perm(i % 8, number % 10);
    c = mult(c, p);
  }

  return inv[c];
}

verhoeff4 <- function(x) {
  verhoeff4_c(x, d5_mult, d5_perm, d5_inv)
}
verhoeff4(142857)

## [1] 3

microbenchmark(
  verhoeff2(142857),
  verhoeff3(142857),
  verhoeff4(142857)
)

## Unit: microseconds
##               expr    min     lq median     uq   max neval
##  verhoeff2(142857) 21.808 24.910 26.838 27.797 64.22   100
##  verhoeff3(142857) 17.699 18.742 19.599 20.764 81.67   100
##  verhoeff4(142857)  3.143  3.797  4.095  4.396 13.21   100

And we get a pay off: verhoeff4() is about 5 times faster than verhoeff2().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Hadley, nice work! The only issues are that, in general, leading zeroes are important, so the input can not be converted to numeric as digits2 and verhoeff3 and verhoeff4 do with some padding of the split digit vectors. Also the use of integers would put limits on the length of the input: for 32-bit intergers only 8 digits would be safe. Barcodes, although using a different scheme, have 12 digits plus a check-digit. –  James Mar 25 '14 at 11:14
    
@James the strategy would still work with numeric vectors (for an increased range), or I expect the C++ would be nearly as fast looping over chars from of a String –  hadley Mar 25 '14 at 12:45

Richie C answered the vectorisation question nicely; as for only creatig the tables once without cluttering the global name space, one quick solution that does not require a package is

verhoeffCheck <- local(function(x)
{
## calculates check digit based on Verhoeff algorithm
## note that due to the way strsplit works, to call for vector x, use sapply(x,verhoeffCheck)
## check for string since leading zeros with numbers will be lost
if (class(x)!="character"){stop("Must enter a string")}
#split and convert to numbers
digs <- strsplit(x,"")[[1]]
digs <- as.numeric(digs)
digs <- rev(digs)   ## right to left algorithm
## apply algoritm - note 1-based indexing in R
d <- 0
for (i in 1:length(digs)){
    d <- d5_mult[d+1,(d5_perm[(i%%8)+1,digs[i]+1])+1]
    }
d5_inv[d+1]
})

assign("d5_mult", matrix(c(
    0:9, c(1:4,0,6:9,5), c(2:4,0:1,7:9,5:6), c(3:4,0:2,8:9,5:7),
    c(4,0:3,9,5:8), c(5,9:6,0,4:1), c(6:5,9:7,1:0,4:2), c(7:5,9:8,2:0,4:3),
    c(8:5,9,3:0,4), 9:0), 10, 10, byrow = TRUE), 
    envir = environment(verhoeffCheck))

assign("d5_perm", matrix(c(
    0:9, c(1,5,7,6,2,8,3,0,9,4), c(5,8,0,3,7,9,6,1,4,2),
    c(8,9,1,6,0,4,3,5,2,7), c(9,4,5,3,1,2,6,8,7,0), c(4,2,8,6,5,7,3,9,0,1),
    c(2,7,9,3,8,0,6,4,1,5), c(7,0,4,6,9,1,3,2,5,8)), 8, 10, byrow = TRUE),
    envir = environment(verhoeffCheck))

assign("d5_inv", c(0,4:1,5:9), envir = environment(verhoeffCheck))
## Now just use the function

which keeps the data in the environment of the function. You can time it to see how much faster it is.

Hope this helps.

Allan

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